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NIA 

SDD7 15Q25bfl 1 

California State Library 

vj j. a i n, ^BRARY. 



Accession Ho. . 











PRICE 10 CENTS ^ .';: j .'.' ;. : •• ; ::..;:".* A j>V ~ $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCC 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 1924 



LOS ANGELES 



The Dumbarton Highway Bridge 




Connecting Central California and the San Francisco Peninsula will serve a population 
of approximately 1,000,000. Estimated cost $1,700,000. 

Bridges as Revenue Producers 

THE COLUMBIA RIVER BRIDGE; at Portland. Oregon, serving a population of 
approximately 285,000. has EARNED $1,693,262.00 NET during the six years and seven 
months of its operation. Cost $1,683,556.00. 

THE ST. fOHNS RIVER BRIDGE at Jacksonville, Florida, serving a population of 
slightly over 100.000 has EARNED $354,735 NET during- the twenty-seven months of its 
operation. Cost $1,200,000 approximately. 

THE SAVANNAH-ALTAMAH \ BRIDGE COMPANY'S President, Mills B. Lane, in 
a letter to the DUMBARTON HIGHWAY BRIDGE CORPORATION says: 

"The bridge was opened to traffic in March, 19S1, with a weekly income from toll 
of less (ban $100 per week, while at the present time we are receiving S1200 and 
$1500 per week, and the indications are the receipts will go mueh higher." 



riease send me full information on t'ie earning possibilitiea of 



DUMBARTON HIGHWAY BRIDGE 



Name ... 
Address 



Dumbarton Highway Bridge Corporation 

625 Market St. San Francisco Room 512 






The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which tfave never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1923 

Assets $89,174,468.57 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 430^275,-37, • 

■• • ! "'r *.i • * •■ 

MISSION BRANCH MjV»i>3«^£lsfSt-fe*ts ', 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH ClemcHtSi*. aflcMh Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haisht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Ports lAve. ajid Utljuj St.; 

1 — *..• " • *j •••/•• : c 

Interest paid on Deposits at theraletjr,,' I "••! 1 ... 
FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J^) per cent per annum, 
COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Accident and 
Health 

Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

1 05 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 
raid Up Capital $15,000,000 S15.000.000 Reserve Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COITLTHARD, Assistant Manager 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

S17-1S California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 

and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 35c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone DouglaB 2433 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



St Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUPSRIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teetlt 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge- We are 
always pleased to talk it over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system ; it takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL. DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

Practice limited to 
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours 10 to 5 — By Appointment — 

Saturday 10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 

Removed to Suite 587 Liebes Bldg. 

177 POST STREET 

San Francisco 



73G 




Established July 20. 1656 



,^g F&AKKgQ© 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. CIV 



SAX FRANCISCO, CALIF, SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 1924 



No. 1 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISED is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. Russ Building;. :235 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 
Calif. Telephone Douglas G853. Entered at San Francisco. Calif.. Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill. E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 



— Advertising: our sunny climate has its drawbacks. What 
a frappe "dip" in old Neptune, that must have been for 
the Olympics, last Tuesday! 

— The Mexican situation may lie likened, as far as the 
rebels are concerned, to the man who held the bear's tail 
in his teeth and was making' fast time toward the tall tim- 
ber. 

* * * 

— In speaking- of ambition. Abbe Garine once said to 
J. J. Rousseau: "If each man could read the hearts of all 
others, there would lie more people who would prefer to 
come down, than rise in the world." 

— The bridge the bay movement is going now full swing, 
but it needs more enthusiasm to put it over in its entirety. 
Each new span across the bay means a great advance for 
this city and for the surrounding country as well. 

* * * 

— San Francisco has not only established a wonder rec- 
ord in financial and building- matters in 1923, but the birth 
and marriage statistics should help to make us chesty. The 

births are far in excess of the marriages. 

* * * 

— The railroads have had a prosperous year and now 
they are planning to spend millions in improvements. Right 
there is the difference between practical railroad manage- 
ment and by corporation ownership, and the operation of 
rail lines under the government control, 

— 'The precincts of an embassy are territor} of the coun- 
try represented by the Ambassador. It is difficult to see 
bow the rabid prohibitionists may prevail on the I 
States authorities to violate territorial rights because the 
embassies have liquor, and a somewhat open house-keep 
ing, 

* * * 

— Soli sisters and brothers have prepared a petition to 
Save the life of Kels, and are soliciting signatures in the 
criminal's home town. Sentimentalists of this type should 
lie marooned on a desert island, where the) could senti- 
mentalize over each other to their heart's content. 

* * * 

— "If society permitted the open frankness about Sex 
matters that n does about such natural functions as di- 
gestion or elimination, the amount of fear and worry in 
the world would be obliterated to a tremendous degree; 
for frank familiarity breeds confidence as well as 
tempt." So says Edward Huntington Williams, in his 
book. "Our Fear Complexes." 



— In a recent case the defendant said that the bookkeep- 
ing of his stenographer was mysterious, and that he could 
not understand the entries. It is to be feared that this is 
not an unusual condition. Too much is left to stenograph- 
ers. 

* * * 

— The police are doing their best, but the warning sign 
at the corner of Third and Kearny is a witness to the dan- 
ger of the traffic at present. People should not be com- 
pelled to take such risks, and it is bad government that 
requires it. One way streets, and the problem is solved. 

* * * 

— So the Eskimos are getting California music via the 
radio. They have never seen a train, even, and electricity 
is unknown, yet there comes to them this music from an 
utterly, to them, incredible distance. Please let us be care- 
ful. We run great risks of destroying' the primitive musical 
sense of the Eskimo. No power without responsibility. 
Mr. Broadcaster! 

— They are getting down to real business in Washing- 
ton. Magnus of Minnesota is reported beaten in a milk- 
ing test by Wallace of the Department of Agriculture. 
Now the redoubtable Magnus asks for a bucksaw test. If 
more of the Senators confined themselves to that which 
they know how to do, the country would be far better off. 
Eel us turn the Congressional hall into a country fair ex- 
hibit, and let each alleged statesman take up the tools of 
his profession, from jaw-smith down. 

— "What the masses of working people demand of 
movies, "says Hugo Von Hofmannsthal in London Mercury, 
"is a substitute for dreams. They would fill their imag- 
ination-, with pictures, powerful presentments charged with 
the ven essence of life itself. Life owes this to them. The 
minds t<\ these spectators are empty; it is not the fault 
of Nature, but rather of the existence which society forces 
them to endure." All the more then, should playwrights, 
production companies, and theater managers, see that pic- 
tures should be occasionally of an educational trend; anil 
eliminate the sordid, criminal and harrowing scenes as 
much as possible; for the working-classes make up. to a 

great extent, the moving picture audience-. 

* * * 

— Gradually this Nation will realize the detrimental ef- 
fect of the working out of the League of Nations over in 
Europe, and will congratulate itself upon its wisdom in 
staving out. The League, in creating new states, has ser- 
iously impaired agricultural productivity and retarded the 
revival of world trade. For instance, the former German 
beet-sugar lands in the 1'osen district, produced 200.000 
tons of sugar last season, under the Polish regime, as 
against 450.000 tons before the war; the peace settlement 
threw southern Styria into Jugoslavia, which, with bad 
crops, interferes with the free export of products prefcr- 
ing to cater to the In ■me consumer. Styria. remaining a 
part of Austria, is compelled to eke out it-- food nece 
b\ buying wheat in the Chicago market. 5000 miles away. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 5, 1924 




We have passed through the worst 
Hail the New Year! of it, it would seem. Now the path 
is clear for rehabilitation and the 
gradual, or even speedy, return of full confidence and pros- 
perity. 

When the year opened it was full of all sorts of dreadful 
possibilities and clouds hung low on the horizon. The 
complaints of France that Germany was not keeping her 
word raised forebodings of a very ominous sort. Now, we 
know that the worst has happened and that, with the en- 
try of France into the Ruhr and the consequent results, 
the path has really been entered upon for a new arrange- 
ment in Europe which will eventuate satisfactorily. It is 
much better to confront a concrete thing than a fear, and 
we have the concrete thing now to face. It will be remem- 
bered that in the midst of the worst days of the war when 
the submarine sinkings were so dramatically terrifying. 
Lloyd George said that, given a practical problem, men 
could always solve it. So is it in Europe now. The night- 
mare is no longer a nightmare, it is a practical problem, 
and surely enough the solution will be found, though 
there may be much hurt and trouble in the finding of it. 
But it is absolutely necessary not only for Great Britain, 
but also for us, that the confusion and the interruption of 
industry be put an end to, so that we may deal and trade 
with each other in confidence and restore the great mar- 
kets, which our system of production demands. 

As regards our country too, there has been a marked 
step towards settlement and the development of the arts of 
peace and mutual confidence. There never was a time when 
factional hate was less than now. and there has not been 
for many years a condition between capital and labor 
which, on the whole, gives greater promise for the future. 
Of course it must be conceded that the farmer question is 
still to be solved, and that in front of the wheat growers 
there is a difficult situation arising out of the economic 
law of diminishing returns and the. perhaps more economi- 
cal, methods of raising wheat elsewhere and in Canada, 
in particular. But such things arise naturally in the course 
of social growth, and can be met in the course of time, 
though it may be frankly admitted that their solution al- 
ways involves a certain amount of local suffering. This 
the government may be trusted to deal with, for there 
never was a government more concerned than ours with 
the well being of the people. 

So, the great majority being convinced of the essential 
integrity of our institutions and the undeniable ability 
and whole heartedness of our statesmen, we may face 
whatever the future has to offer, with confidence, being- 
certain that as we have gone so far so well, we shall con- 
tinue the route as Providence has predetermined it. 



There is a report which seems to be 
Doheny Interests more or less well founded, that the Do- 
heny interests are about to go into the 
retail sale of gasoline in the state and in order to promote 
this business are about to organize the Pan-American 
Western Petroleum Company, as subsidiary of the Pan- 
American Petroleum Company. There is to be capitaliza- 
tion of $15,000,000, of which the public will have access to 
$12,000,000. It is expected that there will be a profit of 
approximately 7 per cent. It is obvious that if there is to be 
a prolonged conflict for the control of the gasoline retail 
business in the State of California a much larger initial 



capital than that suggested, would be necessary. This 
makes the press reports at least a little dubious and one 
cannot but view the whole matter with suspicion, as the 
Doheny people have hitherto been very astute in their 
management, and there is no reason to suppose that they 
are likely to venture rashly out of their depth. There is 
something bigger behind the scheme than that advertised. 
Clever organizers have suggested that this is perhaps but 
a beginning of a general organization, which will embrace 
the whole country and obtain control of the retail trade. 
But there are at least four first-rate concerns, none of 
which can be considered likely to abandon a position al- 
ready won, in favor of a new rival. 



There is quite a contest going on in 
Beauty and Boodle Oakland at the present as to whether 

the sequoia groves above the old 
Joaquin Miller place shall be saved for the community or 
turned over to the real estate people. It is almost lese 
majeste to suggest that the real estaters should for a while 
at least, suspend their attack and allow the community a 
chance to determine whether it thinks enough of the red- 
woods to keep them. Frankly, we don't think very much 
of the public in a matter of that sort. We are of the opinion 
that the public has little respect for redwoods or for any- 
thing of beauty and dignity. The public wants noise and 
Speed and the redwoods furnish neither. The public is 
essentially vulgar and the redwoods are the very antithesis 
of vulgarity, being the essence of repose and dignity. But, 
apart from the public, there is in Oakland a small group of 
aristocrats in the best sense of the word, who will not al- 
low thing- of beauty to be destroyed, and who are making 
a gallant stand for the trees. But to run counter to real 
estate interests in Oakland is an Herculean task and one 
cannot but be sorry for the refined crusaders. In the war 
between beauty and boodle, it is boodle that has the best 
chance, and there is no place in the world where boodle 
has a better chance than in Oakland. 



There is a sort of discussion going on 
The Gist of the at the present time between Secretary 
Russian Question Hughes and the Russian government. 

with respect to recognition. The Secre- 
tary charges that a propaganda is being conducted in this 
country by the Russian government and produces certain 
documents. The Russian officials say that the information 
is garbled and that the documentary evidence is not 
straight. That is a matter of fact that should be capable 
of actual proof. But it may be noted that there is a strong 
pro-Russian element in the Senate and elsewhere, which is 
pressing the matter of recognition. It would be foolish to 
doubt the essential loyalty of these senators. What is the 
influence behind them? It is obvious that Russia is a very 
rich country possessing, indeed, incredible amounts of un- 
developed wealth. There is a chance to get a share in that 
development and numbers of Americans are in favor of 
taking that chance. Who can blame them? As' a certainty, 
England and France will both get into the game very soon 
and why should we be left behind? Surely we are not 
idiotic enough to think that a poor weak country such as 
Russia is, could make any impact on a nation like ours, 
which for material strength and scientific training is worth 
a score of Russias. We are of the opinion that if there is 
an opening, we should have our chance like the rest. 



— W. I. Wagner, head of our state institutions, reports an 
increase of 253 inmates during the last twelve months. He- 
cause of the cheery conditions inaugurated therein by the 
sob sisters, these places are much less unattractive than 
formerly, and. once incarcerated, if surroundings should 
pall on an inmate, our liberal parole system is at his 
service. 



[anuan ?. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



CONDENSED STATEMENT OK CONDITION 
HEAD OFFICE AMI BRANCHES 

Bank of Italy 



SAVINGS 



COMMERCIAL 



HEAD OFFICE SAN FRANCISCO 
December 2!», 1923 



RESOURCES 

First Mortgage Loans on Real 

Estate $115,733,167.93 

other Loans and Discounts 84.722,763.01 $200. 505,930. 34 



United States. State, County and 
Municipal Bonds and United 
States Certificates of Indebted- 
ness $ 46.602,514.67 

Other Bonds and Securities 9,341,343.99 

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank... 600,000.00 



T( iTAL U. S. AND OTHER SECURITIES 

Due from Federal Reserve Bank..$ 13.569.876.54 
Cash and Due from Other Banks 17.240,793.51 



TOTAL CASH AND DUE FROM BANKS 

Banking Premises. Furniture. Fixtures and Safe 
Deposit Vaults (75 banking offices in 52 Cali- 
fornia Cities) 

Other Real Estate Owned 

Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit and 
Acceptances 

Interest Earned — Uncollected 

Employes' Pension Fund — $120,556.69 (Carried 
on books at) 

Other Resources 



56.543.858.66 



30,810,670.05 



10,220. 
686, 



655, 
2,388 



152 



269.27 
469.48 



660.83 
358.15 



1.00 
259.39 



TOTAL RESOURCES $301,963,477.77 

LIABILITIES 
DEPOSITS 

Savings $187,977,307.73 

Commercial 88.571,571.47 $276,548,870.20 

49,934.07 
1,016,608.60 

75,662.79 
655,660.83 



Irrigation District Funds 

Dividends Unpaid 

Discount Collected but Not Earned 

Letters of Credit. Acceptances and Time Drafts 



•CAPITAL PAID IN 

SURPLUS 

Undivided Profits . 

Interest Earned but Not Collected 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $301,963,477.77 

All chargre-offs, expenxew imtl interest payable to end of half-year 
have been <lethu-tetl in above Htiitement 



$278,346,645 49 

$ 15,000,000.00 

5.000.000.00 

1,228.474.13 

2,388,358.15 



*The issuance of 25,000 additional combined shares of stock of 
Bank of Italy and Stockholders Auxiliary Corporation (the stock 
of which Corporation is owned by the same stockholders) will 
give these Corporations in July, 1921. a combined Paid-in Capi- 
tal, Surplus and Undivided Profits of approximately $35,000,000. 

A. P. Giannini and W\ K. Williams, being separately duly 

sworn each for himself, says that said A. P. Giannini is Presi- 
dent and that said W. U Williams is Cashier Of the Bank of 
Italy, the corporation above mentioned, and that every state- 
ment contained herein is true of his own knowledge and belief. 

A. P. GIANNINI. 

W. It. WILLIAMS. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 29th day of De- 
cember, 1023. thcmas s. BURNBS, Notary Public 

The Story of Our Growth 



AS SHOWN BY 



A COMPARATIVE 
RESOURCES 



TATEMKNT OK OCR 



December. 1904 ..$286,436.97 

December, 19 OS * 2. 5 7 4, 004. 90 

December, 1912 $11 S2K.M 1 4 ..-><> 

I >ecember, 1°16 $39)805.995.24 

December, 1920 $157,464,685.08 

December, 1922 S254.2S2,2S'i. 52 

December 29, 1923 $301,963,477.77 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 4S.-.,l:5<i 
Commencing January 1st, Savings Deposits made 00 or 

before the first das ol any month (or the tenth day of 
January, April, ,iui> ami October) will earn interest tram 
the First of that month; deposits made after said date 
will earn Interest from the Bret of the following month. 



P G and E- 

is California's code for 

"SERVICE 



QUICKLY, the alert mind translates the 
letter P G and E into the word SER- 
VICE. 

Thoughtlessly, the average citizen accepts 
this service as a matter of course, so un- 
obstrusively and faithfully is it rendered. 

What is the P G and E? Are you able to 
answer? 

The P G and E is a practical demonstra- 
tion of intelligent co-operation! 

Over 40,000 Californians in all walks of 
life supply most of its capital. 

Approximately 8,500 employees (receiving 
a payroll of over $14,000,000 annually) op- 
erate the company. 

About 700,000 customers, scattered over 
an area as large as seven Eastern states, 
enjoy the advantages of this "public-part- 
nership" arrangement. 

Whether you are a security holder, em- 
ployee t>r customer, be proud of your part in 
fostering one of the State's must important 
industries. 

For upon its success depends the success of 
thousands of other industrial activities in 
this community — and they in turn affect you. 



Pacific Gas and Electric Company 



PG 



and Ih « 

SERVICE" 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 5, 1924 



TownMLCrier 



i WHO THE DEWLART THOU. 
'ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
I QE\JIL,31R WITH YOU" 

Shakspeare- 



— 'What is this perennial agitation in the Mooney case and 
why do not the advocates of his release see the hopeless- 
ness of the situation and reconcile themselves to it? The 
whole Mooney matter has caused more trouhle than a 
dozen Mooneys could justify, and might have caused more, 
for it is not too well known that the life of our ambassador 
in Petersburg, for some time, actually hung by a thread, 
as a result of the agitation of the case, there, during the 
revolutionary times. When the news came to Washing- 
ton, the n; tional officials did not know who Mooney was. 
but they knew in Petersburg! This agitation should be 

sat down on hard. 

* * * 

— What is William Kent up to now? They are trying 
to get up an organization with a big name to counteract 
the Better American Federation. So there will be some 
fur flying because, of course, such an organization will 
function politically and we shall have quite a lot of ex- 
citement. There will be money enough behind it to turn 
the wheels. But how about the personnel? We notice that 
our old friend Paul Scharrenberg already looms large. Now. 
they must really do something better than that or they 

will be laughed out of existence before they breathe. 

* * * 

— An English baronet (he was a baronet, by the way, 
whose title was a recognition of his industrial importance) 
the other day at dinner, remarked very modestly, that he 
doubted if we had the proper publicity. He pointed out 
the fact already noted by Marshall Foch. that the coun- 
try round here is as good as the Riviera. He also said that 
in his belief there was no such beautiful town in the world 
as this and pointed to the ends of the streets, which are 
either in sea or sky. Somehow we don't get right in the 
matter of advertising. Even Californians Inc., has not the 
combination. 

— If you were a policeman would you rather be a lit- 
erary cop or a philosophical one? Psychological policemen 
are the pride of Berkeley; literary, playwriting policemen 
are the darlings of Oakland. And our policemen? Shall 
we ever forget the animal thief-catcher who was sent to 
pass on the morality of play and condemned it for the good 
old English word "slut"? We have much to learn, at "least 
our police have, and, like the policemen in the Pirates of 
Penzance, they just don't. 

* # * 

— The state mineralogist has said that coal of good qual- 
ity and in large quantities has been found in Mendocino 
County and transportation is available. The effect of this 
upon the state, if the advice proves to be correct, can 
hardly be estimated. It may pull us into the manufactur- 
ing world. In some respects, this might be regretted, but 
we have such a large state that not even coai mines and 
factories can hurt it. 

* * * 

— It would be quite a blow to Carmel if the artistic col- 
ony did really leave, and we are assured that the pros- 
pects of their doing so are very likely. They have suc- 
ceeded in making a town, no matter what the press says. 
which is almost unique and which has fame even in Eu- 
rope. The "Town Crier" met a gentleman there from Italy 
last summer, who had come all the way from Milan to 
visit. Such advertising cannot be bought. To destroy the 
characteristics of the place in the name of modernity is 
nothing short of sheer stupidity. 



— There is a sort of war on between the motor road 
carriers and the railroads. This is an unfortunate inter- 
lude out of which nobody can profit. The transportation 
business should be a unified business, earning a reasonable 
interest on invested capital, and giving the public the ser- 
vice. The railroads are foolish to fight the road-transpor- 
tation people, for road-transportation has come to stay. 
On the other hand, it is ridiculous for the road carriers 
to think that they can stand out against the railroads. They 
have not enough capital. Let us have peace and prosper- 
ity. 

* * * 

— There should be something done about the Federal 
Judgeship. It is not to the dignity of the office that the 
place should be made dependent on the wishes of the poli- 
ticians and a post of such importance bandied around like 
a clerk's job, as a reward for political services. Sam Knight 
would make an ideal judge, but Senator Johnson is in the 
way. He always manages to be in the way for some rea- 
son or other. 

* * * 

— Well, the prohibition squad did its best to do away with 
the alcoholic cheer at the New Year. Some of you may 
have felt the force of their attack, but most of you that 
wished to toast your friends on that occasion, were able 
to do so. In some places there was heavy drinking, quick 
and nasty drinking, due to fear of the squad. How long 
will this absurdity last? 





eart oi 
romantic 
America, 

ast 

and there are 

® all year © 

excu&Jons 

at reduced, round trip 
rates to nudcontinent 
and Atlantic Coast points 
Stopovers anywhere 
Fred Harvey meals 

Ar details and reservations 

R. D. Johnson_ Div. Pass. Agt., 601 Market Street, or 
Ferry Depot, Phone gutter 7<;oo 




MARY HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



Luncheon is served from 1 I : 30 to 2:30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 

334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 



VVVV\NXXN\XVVNVNNXNXNVXXNNSNVSVN\\\NVVNVVX\NV> 



fanuary 5. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



OPPORTUNITY 



OPPORTUNITY knocks only once and he who 
iloes not heed is lost. The Grass Valley Exten- 
sion Mines Co. has seventeen hundred acres in the 
heart of a proven gold producing district and is 
presenting an opportunity for participation in its 
stock to develop this property. 

This district has produced $300,000,000.00 in gold. 
Within a twenty-five mile radius of Banner Moun- 
tain there has "been produced $800,000,000.00 in 
gold. 

Gold formed the backbone of the wealth of this 
glorious state. First came the forty-niner, with his 
crude methods ; then the early type of quartz mill ; 
then the modern, scientifically designed plant of the 
present day, which extracts 95 per cent of the values 
contained in the ore. 

Some of our neighboring properties have been 
producing since 1851 ; others since 1855. Examine 
our maps and notice the proximity of these proper- 
ties to ours. Our maps are sworn to before a notary 
as being correct and authentic. 

The 

Grass Valley Extension 

Mines Co. 

is a California Corporation 

and invites you to participate in financing 
250.000 shares of its capital stock. You art- of- 
fered a fifty-fifty proposition to go in partner- 
ship in a proposition which may lead you to finan- 
cial independence. We are mine operators, not wild 
cat promoters; neither are we seeking the wild cat 



investor, who runs hand in glove with the get-rich- 
quick promotions. We are enlisting the support of 
conservative investors. Mining is not a gamble as 
many people think, but is a straight business propo- 
sition, largely manufacturing a product material- 
ized by labor and capital, in which there is no com- 
petition for your product. The United States Gov- 
ernment is always a willing buyer of gold bullion. 
Mining failures are due to two things — lack of; 
capital for development and poor management or 
ignorance of mining values. 

The Grass Valley Extension Mines Co. offers 
you capable, efficient, economical management, and 
a property in a proven district. The vein char- 
acteristics, wall formations and all geological points 
make this property valuable from a mining stand- 
point and we hope that the California people will 
prove their loyalty to the second industry in the 
state. 

What have you ever done to add material wealth 
to this wonderful state? 

Our evidence proving the merit of our propo- 
sition is interesting and convincing and it appeals to 
the conservative investor. Come in and see us, and 
let us explain the facts personally. 

The directors of this company have been work- 
ing nearly two years safeguarding these wonderful 
mineral holdings without pay and can only profit 
through dividends. We are operating under Permit 
X... 240/8 of the State of California/ 

If you are looking For a Cook or Ponzi proposi- 
tion we can not interest you. but if you wish to 
invest in a legitimate mining proposition recom- 
mended by reputable engineers we can show you 
everv reason ti> invest. 



Remember 

Opportunity Knocks Only Once and 

He Who Hesitates Is Lost 



COUPON 



Grass Valley Extension 
Mines Co. 

129 Fremont Street 
San Francisco. California 
Ttlephmt Douglas - 



GRASS VALLEY EXTENSION MINES CO. 
12!) Fremonl Btreet Ba Francisco, Calif. 

Please send, without obligation on my part, full infor- 
mation on the investment opportunity offered by your 

company. 



!_ 



Same 

Telephone 
Address 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER January S, 1924 



THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY 

(HIBERNIA BANK) 

MARKET, Mc.ALI.ISTER AM) JONES STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO 
Statement of Condition, December 31, 1923 

ASSETS 

BOXDS OF THE UNITED STATES I $ 10,S49,900.000 I , of the State 
of California and the Counties Cilies and School Districts there- 
of ($21,575,050.65), of the State of New York ($2,149,000.00), 
of the City of New York ($1,139,000.00), of the State of Nevada 
($100,000,001, of the State of Oregon ($51,000.00) of the County 
of Lane, Ore. ($200,000.00). of the County of ' Bergen, N. J. 
($140,000.00), of the County of Douglas, Ore. ($147,000.00), of 
the County of Jackson Ore. ($84,000,00 1, of the County of Clacka- 
mas, Ore. ($73,950.00'), of the City of Cleveland, Ohio ($105,000.- 
00), of the City of St. Paul, Minn. ($100,000.00), of the City of 
Jersey City, N. J. ($50,000.00), of the City of Portland Ore. 
($5 0,000.00), of the City of Dayton, Ohio ($25,000.00), the actual 
value of which is $36,82G,65S,13 

MISCELLANEOUS BONDS, comprising Steam Railway Bonds 
($550 000.00), Street Railway Bonds ($260,000.00), Quasi-Public 
Corporation Bonds ($3,624,000.00), the actual value of which is.... 4.310.465.86 

CASH ON HANI) 3,309,702.09 

PROMISSORY NOTES and the debts thereby secured, the actual 

value of which is - - 34,664,099.74 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said 
Corporation, and the payment thereof is secured by First Mort- 
gages on Real Estate within this state, and the States of Oregon, 
Nevada, Washington and Utah. 

PROMISSORY NOTES and the debts thereby secured, the actual value 

of which is - 316.245.00 

Said Promissory Notes are all existing Contracts, owned by said 
Corporation, and are payable to it at its office, and the payment 
thereof is secured by pledge of Bonds and other securities. 

REAL ESTATE situate in the City and County of San Francisco 
($65,002.00), and in the Counties of Monterey ($63,395.46), and 
San Luis Obispo ($91,571,23 1. in this State, the actual value of 
which is 2 19.96S. 6 9 

THE LANDS AND BUILDING in which said Corporation keeps its 

said office, the actual value of which is 1,011,713.03 

TOTAL ASSETS $80,058,852.54 

LIABILITIES 
SAID CORPORATION OWES DEPOSITORS amounting to and the 

actual value of which is $75,636 503 97 

RESERVE FUND 5,0221348.57 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $80,058,853.54 

The Hibemia Savings ami Loan Society, 

By E. J. TOBIN, President. 
The Hibemia Savings and Loan Society, 

By J. O. TOBIX, Acting Secretary. 

State of California. I 

City anrl County of San Francisco. ( ss ' 

E. .1. TOBIN and J. O. TOBIN, beine each duly sworn, each for himself, says: That E. J. 
Tobin is President and that said J. O. TV-bin is Acting Secretary of THE 11IBEKN1A SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing statement 
is true. 

E. .1. TOBIN, President. 

.1. o. TOBIN, Acting Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this -1st day of December 1923 

IDAS. T. STANLEY. 
Notary Public in and for the City and County of San Francisco 
State of California. 



January 5, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




As Redwood City Entrance Will Look 



UNITY IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

Central and Northern California have finally achieved 
the unity of action behind civic improvements that they 
have been struggling for years to attain. This statement 
was made by John Lyle Harrington, internationally fa- 
mous bridge builder, and president of the Dumbarton High- 
way Bridge Corporation, after a careful and thorough in- 
vestigation of the co-operation given the bridge project 
by the civic, economic and industrial organizations of the 
lower bay districts in the San Joaquin and Sacramento Val- 
jeys. 

This unity of action will quickly dispel the belief that 
Southern California is the most co-operative section of the 
State, Harrington said on his return from the East last 
week. Practically every organization that has for its ob- 
ject civic and municipal betterment has gone on record as 
approving the project, and the majority of them have gone 
even further — they have organized to assist in the sale of 
stock. Real estate dealers were quick to realize the im- 
portance of the bridge project to their business, and ac- 
cording to reports given Harrington, many of the dealers 
are as enthusiastic over the bridge as they are over the 
properties listed with them for sale. The San Francisco 
motor car dealers gave their approval to the project and 
some of the larger organizations said in making purchases 
of stock, that they considered the completion of the Dum- 
barton Bridge as one of the best >ales insurance policies 
that they could obtain. In the years following the open- 
ing of the Dumbarton Bridge every business firm, indus- 
try and citizen within the bridge's economic radius will 
derive benefits from it either directly or indirectly. 



WELFARE OF CITY DEMANDS UNIFICATION OF 
RAILWAYS 

The vital matter of the immediate purchase by the city 
of the privately owned railways was the only matter upon 
which the two candidates for Mayor differed at the last 
election. Rolph stood firmly for the immediate purchase. 
McSheehy for dangerous delay. Rolph beat McSheehy 
by about 27,000. This was the natural result on this issue. 
The people in 1920 gave a larger vote for proceeding to 
unify the street railways than the vote which Rolph re- 
ceived at the last election, and they voted for this unifica- 
tion by a majorit) of about 27,000. Then again in 1922 the 
people gave a vote for this unification larger by several 
thousands than the vote which Rolph received at the last 

election, and gave a majority for unification of nearly 36,- 
000, which is nearly 8000 greater than Rolph's majority. 

The welfare of the city itself demands that the Mayor 
and Supervisors proceed without delay in this matter. It 
is the way. and the only way, to rented} San Francisco's 
greatest need — improvement in our street-car transporta- 
tion facilities by giving- us universal transfers, snorter 

routes and through cars throughout the city; the much 



needed street-car extensions for developing many districts 
in our city; remedying the intolerable street-car conditions 
on Market street and by having the city own and operate 
the San Mateo street-car line in conjunction with all city 
lines for developing' San Francisco down the peninsula. 
These improvements are necessary for those who ride on 
the street cars, business and professional people, mechan- 
ics, working men of all classes, women and men working 
in stores and offices, shoppers, theatre-g'oers, school child- 
ren ; also for the property owners and the public generally. 
They are vital to the convenience and prosperity of our 
citizens and the growth of San Francisco. They can only 
be obtained by having our street railway system under 
one ownership, through the immediate acquisition by the 
city of the privately owned street railway system. Fortu- 
nately, it is possible to have these properties pay for them- 
selves out of their earnings so that they will not be a charge 
upon the taxpayers. 



Y. M. C. A. 

From the dwelling that once was known as the old 
Spreckels home at Twenty-first and Capp streets, an in- 
tensive program of welfare work for men and boys is be- 
ing promoted. 

The building has been converted into the home of the 
new Mission Branch of the San Francisco Y. M. C. A. and 
its program of recreational and physical welfare work for 
men and boys of the district is being carried on under the 
guidance of trained leaders. 



— A Scotchman entered a hotel and inquired what the 
rates were, lie was told that the charges were $5 a day 
for rooms on the first floor, $4 for rooms on the second, $3 
on the third, and $2 on the top floor. The Scot, after a mo- 
ments' reflection, started for the door, when the clerk asked 
him if he considered the charges too high. "No," replied 
Sandy, "it's the building that is not high enough." 



January Sale ffiSnl Furs 

25 to 50 off 

We hardly Deed to remind you of the tin- 
ailed quality and Incomparable style of 
Gassner furs. These extreme reductions. 
therefore, should attract widespread atten- 
tion — and bring in immediate response. 
Consequently, early buying is strongly rec- 
ommended. 

Xo Mail Orders 

LOUIS GASSNER, Inc. 



112 GEARY STREET 



Near GRANT AVENUE 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 5. 1924 




By ANTISTHENES 

IN the Mexican war, that country seems well supplied with 
officers high in command; we have failed to note in 
press dispatches mention of a military rank of less than 
general. 

# * # 

Nowhere does hope spring so eternally as in the Mexi- 
can breast; no matter who loses in the present fracas, 
he'll have another chance at it in a month or so. 



"The veterans' bureau should be placed entirely under civil 
service." William Dudley Foulke, president of the National 
Civil Service Reform League, declared in a letter to Sena- 
tor Reed of Pennsylvania, who is investigating affairs of 
the bureau. "That bureau with its 28,000 employes, (non- 
civil service, of course) stands as a shocking illustration 
of the infamies which political plunder injects into our 
national life." The politicians' meat is patronage, and pat- 
ronage means placing in positions of trust not they who 
are most efficient in the work to hand but they who. ir- 
respective of quality, best served their masters' interests. 
Civil service is not perfect but it is practical perfection in 
contrast with the spoils system. One cannot get blood out 
of a turnip nor may the ordinary hod-carrier graduate over- 
night into a banker, yet that is what the spoils system of 
appointment essays to do; hence the evil train that follows 
as charged by William Dudley Foulke. 



The torrid climate of the Filipinos possibly accounts 
for their independent yearning to jump from our frying 

pan into the other fellow's fire. 

* * * 

Lieutenant Corliss H. Griffis is sentenced to pay two 
trillion marks for attempting to kidnap Grover Cleveland 
Bergdoll, who, together with many "essential industry" 
workers and "one dollar a year" folks, escaped the draft. 
No doubt some American sympathizer will cable him $1.10 

to fully pay off the fine. 

* * * 

And speaking of the French airship Dixmude, we might 
allocate dirigibles to two classes: those that go up and stay 
up. and those that come down and stay down. 

* * * 

Lloyd George says there are 2,000.000 unemployed in 
England, but the United States immigration bars are up. 
Really. Dave, we'd like to admit all those bally lads but 
presently we have just about enough chores to go around 
for our own boys — who intend to remain here. 

Events travel in cycles: a \v\v years ago and the circus 
was all the go; now. visit some of your main movie houses 
and the orchestras are at it again -only it's a one-ring affair 
and there's no music. 

Only we deem him an honorable man 'twould almost 
seem Henry Ford had bartered his nomination birthright 
for a mess of Muscle Shoals. 

* * * 

The antipodes of business which the anti-trust laws will 
never have to prosecute for merging into one outfit; un- 
dertaking and life insurance. 



ON THE OUTSIDE LOOKING IN 

Were you ever on the o.utside of a food dispensary, 
"broke," and you didn't care what happened so long- as 
YOU could sit in at those victuals? Major L. T. (irant. 
manager of the Twelfth District of the United Stales vet- 
erans' bureau, on "return from vacation" (this in bleak 
January I announced he was in full accord with the rec- 
ommendation of the senate investigating committee that 
civil service be eliminated from the functioning of the 
veterans' bureau! Then. Brigadier-General etc. Thornwall 
Mullally. chairman of this committee, brought up rein- 
forcements a few days later with the salvo that civil ser- 
vice does not work out in the veterans' bureau! Hence the 
allusion to the outsider and the victuals — the handful of 
civil service people employed in this bureau must be stumb- 
ling blocks athwart the passageway of the hungry on the 
outside — the latter the favorites who stand waiting to feed 
by grace of their friends the generals, majors, etc.. who 
disbelieve in the merit system. 

Now, in contrast — a message from Washington, D. C. : 



The public, generally, regards government employes as 
necessary evils, but. upon reflection, how few are the oc- 
casions when we pay for anything and give glory for which 
we are not overcharged? There must be governmental 
workers if there is to be government; the spoils system is 
obsolete, and it is unthinkable to return to that mess; 
therefore our hope is pinned to a properly conducted merit 
system. Holland, possibly the most progressive nation in 
the world, is entirely under civil service and has been for 
over a century, England, likewise — the system covering 
e\er\ position excepting judgeships and members of par- 
liament. Who ever hears of graft over there? 

The newspapers of the United States generally are not 
in favor of the merit system and logically so — locally, 
search the soft positions of patronage doled out to news- 
paper favorites as reward of their master's efforts to elect 
candidates and the reason for their bias is clear! Politicians 
are naturally opposed to it. and why? No pie to dole out 
to the hungry inefficients they would foist upon the tax- 
payer; cojointly. the paper and the politician rationally 
seek a return to the old order of things and a child may 
sense the why of their leanings: both fatten on the pick- 
ings of patronage. 

So now, when the generals and the majors and the in- 
door fleet commanders are out with their ukase that civil 
service must go. it means the trough is empty and the 
famished boys on the outside with dripping jowls are yelp- 
ing for the Feast. But will the newspapers say this? Will 
a hungry baby slip you its bottle of milk? 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 
ItIVETEI> STEEL ril'E, TANKS, CUI-VERTS, FLUMES, 
PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 
San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Ave. 



"The Largest Fire Insurance 
Company in America" 

FIRE, AUTOMOBILE, WINDSTORM. 
TOURISTS' BAGGAGE INSURANCE 
LlBtKAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



THE HOME 

INSURANCE COMPANY 

NEW YORK 



'IhosEKent 

W 7 



Made to Measure 
only 



IMPORTED FABRICS 
PAJAMAS AND 
NIGHT ROBES 

25 Kearny St., Phone Ky. 3714 



fanuary 5, 1"_4 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




By KEM 

"It's one of the uncanniest things I know — to watch 
a real book on its career— it follows you and drives you 
into a corner and makes you read it." — Christopher 
Morley. 

JO ELLEN, by Alexander Black, just out, is one of the 
real hooks of the year. If you start it and get bv the 
fact that the heroine has a mass of flame-red hair' and 
meet the fascinating- villain, Stan Lamar, hiding- from jus- 
tice, and decide it is going- to be a regular movie whirler 
(not knowing- the" author), you will be agreeably surprised. 
True, it is a modern New York story, — and' there are 
plenty of situations; but they are situations growing out 
of the doings of every day people who want just what the 
average American wants. Jo Ellen, being a true girl, nat- 
urally wants love and marriage, and to really live. Her well 
described mother, and her very much awake, well-hated 
grandmother, are centered on what is best for the girl. 
Her Uncle Ben is her most able champion. One can't for- 
get Uncle Ben with his great fist half-doubled to defend 
his niece's rights, or a toothsome picture of him taking 
her to some well-known restaurant, hoping a heaping plate- 
ful will transcend trouble. But most we love him when, 
crudely noble he bares his "past" to give her an object les- 
son that will send her back to her duty in what both know- 
to be a corner of Jnferno — namely, home with her husband, 
who is no husband, and his mother, who is animated-walk- 
ing-hate. We have to love jo Ellen, who conscientiously 
tries to face heavy odds, bravely; so naturally we scruti- 
nize very carefully the men folks who are drawn to her. — 
not by her flapperish ways — but by her genuine girlish 
charm. Alexander Black knows men — the real, the "half- 
baked" and the counterfeit. \\"c found that out in his for- 
mer novels, THE GREAT DESIRE and THE SEVEN'] 1 1 
ANGEL, and his novelettes. Therefore, when Jo Ellen 
marries one and is drawn as by a magnet to the" arms of 
another, and stands alone, at least, with her eyes full} open. 
— really seeing for the first time the "best man." we put 
down the book with a great sigh of satisfaction that at 
last we've read a decent New- York story, minus cabaret, 
theater and millionaire society doings and that ha-, yet, 
proved colorfully interesting. . 
Harpers, $2. 

Till-'. OUT TRAIL, by Mary Roberts Rinehart, is an 
account by this versatile writer of outings in the mountains 
and deserts of this Continent. The author of TISH knows 
how to make camping trips interesting, instructive and 
amusing. One can sense the tempo in which it is written 
by quoting Mrs, Rinehart's account of how she came by 
her data : 

"1 have roughed it in one wilderness after another, in 

camp and on trail, in the air and on water, in war abroad 
and in peace at home. I have been scared to death more 
times than I can remember. Led b) the exigencies <'f my 
profession, by feminine curiosity, or by the determination 
not io l>e left at home. 1 have been shaken, thrown, bitten, 
sunburned, rained on. shot at. stone-bruised, frozen, broiled 
and scared, with monotonous regularity." \nd die adds: 
"While there is nothing heroic about this record. I am en- 
titled to a silver cup for variety and endurance." 

We surely think she is entitled to a cup. for only a hero- 
ine would have so persisted, and the hook, which is the 



armng 



GRAVEN IMAGE 

By MARGARET WTDDEMER 

Margaret Widdemei-s first serious novel. "It has such delicate 
subtlety and kindly humor that readers will never lay it down 
until they have absorbed its message." $2.00 

Booh, Main Floor Phone Kearny 5000 



result of all these "grinding torments," is well worth while 
for a lover of the good out-doors. 
George H. Doran Company. $2.50. 



THIRTY-ONE STORIES BY THIRTY-ONE AU- 
THORS is a notable gathering up of the short stories of 
many of the modern British writers. The well-known 
names of Galsworthy, H. G. Wells, Arnold Bennett, May 
Sinclair and other well-known writers, head the list; there 
are also many of the newer writers given, too, as the pur- 
pose of the book is to show the different fashion of telling 
stories, and the change from the older to the newer school 
of fiction. The hook is one of interest, not only to the 
student of literature, but also for the bus)- reader who 
fears the temptation of being tied up with a long storv 
when he has only limited time for reading. 

D. Appleton Company. 



AT THE BIB & TUCKER 

Many restaurants and tea rooms advertise "home cook- 
ing," but very few live up to their words. At the Bib & 
Tucker. No. 334 Sutter street, one finds the very best of 
"home cooking." at all times. Especially good are their 
"home-made" pies, and their cuisine in general is so ex- 
cellent that their patrons become regular habitues. 



TYPEWRITERS 

All Makes, All Models— Sold, Rented, Exchanged, Repaired, Rebuilt 
WHY RENT? BUY 

CORONA 

The office typewriter in portable form 

$5.00 Monthly Payments 
CORONA -PACIFIC TYPEWRITER CO., Inc. 

546 Market Street Phone Sutter 1538 




'Mayerle Glasses' 

Relieve Eye Strain 



• jL. 



Sciential Ere Bzaadnatloa q/-q V1__K.pi. Ci 

it Ian 1 Practice la s.n Praadaw •7UU mailed Jl. 



a ; a a a a a 



Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

\M» PA IT KI.HK.KS QAtUBI 

239 Post Street San Francisco 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 5, 1924 




ENGAGEMENTS 

ATTRACTIVE TEA GIVEN BY MRS. SENDER — The engagement 
of Mrs. Gertrude Beardsley Gardner and Charles Sender of 
New York was announced at an attractive tea given recently 
by Mrs. Sender at her home on Washington street. 

AT CLAREMONT TEA — Mrs. Mel Tobriner and Miss lima To- 
briner gave a handsome tea at the Claremont Country Club 
recently at which announcement was made of the engage- 
ment of Miss Tobriner to James Samuel Thornton, son of 
Samuel Thornton, a retired capitalist of Piedmont. He is a 
brother of the Misses Eileen. Hazel and Amy Thornton. They 
are English people who came to California many years ago. 
Miss Tobriner is a sister of Mrs. W. E. Vaughn Jr. of Ala- 
meda and a granddaughter of Mrs. W. S. Palmer. 

BETROTHAL OF MISS WIMMER BONNER — The engagement 
has been announced of Miss Wimmer Bonner, only daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bonner of San Mateo, and Albert 
Gracier, elder son of Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Gracier of Glazen- 
wood. The betrothal was told at a dance given by Mr. and 
Mrs. Bonner at the San Mateo Women's Club on the occa- 
sion of Miss Bonner's birthday recently. 
RECEPTIONS 

MARTIN RECEPTION — Mrs. Eleanor Martin, in a generous way 
so characteristic of her hospitality, sent word to all her friends 
in a general way. not issuing invitations, hoping that they 
would remember that New Year's is her day at home. There 
was the usual big crush coming and going all afternoon. Mrs. 
J. Downey Harvey and Mrs. Oscar Cooper, with a bevy of 
women assisted at the Martin home. 

COUNTESS AT FAIRMONT — Countess Eric Lewenhaupt has been 
passing a few days at the Fairmont, entertaining and being 
entertained. The countess, with her two young sons, Jan 
and Alaric, who have been occupying the L. Montague home 
at Menlo Park during the absence of the family in Honolulu, 
has decided to purchase a country home here. 

FINE ARTS SOCIETY HONORS VANDERBILT — A reception and 
dance in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt Jr. 
will be given this evening at the Fairmont Hotel by the Uni- 
versity Fine Arts Society. A discussion of world topics will 
be given by Vanderbilt. based upon observations on his recent, 
trip around the world. Elsie Hilton Cross, dramatic soprano, 
will sing a group of French and English songs, with Miss 
Mildred Crawford at the piano. A buffet supper will be fol- 
lowed by dancing. 

MRS. BEATRICE Jt/DD'S RECEPTION — One Hundred and Six- 
teen Maiden Lane was the scene of an informal reception 
New Year's day, when Mrs. Beatrice Judd held open house 
from four o'clock until seven o'clock in the evening, to about 
seventy five guests, including Mr. and Mrs. Edward Benja- 
min, Signor Bartellini and Countess Colonna, Lady Mogan, 
Mrs. Ava Salbador. Mrs. Cecil Garnsey, Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward Vought, Raymond Knolles, Miss Gladys Gilcrist, Mr. 
and Mrs. Jack Bromfield. of Burlingame Mr. and Mrs. Nel- 
son Lawrence, Mine. Marie Millete, lutist, Mrs. Eleanore Ross, 
Mrs. A. Raybould of Burlingame, Mrs. Gillespie, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ray Burrill, and others. 

ARMY & NAVY 

GUESTS AT FAIRMONT — Service folk who have been guests 
at the Fairmont in the past week include Real Admiral and 
Mrs. Josiah McKean, Commander and Mrs. William P. Gad- 
dis, and Colonel and Mrs. J. w. Williams of Ross. 

THE MISSES TRUBY ENTERTAIN — One of the pleasantest par- 
ties of last week in army circles here had the Misses Eliza- 
beth and Barbara Truby, the young daughters of Colonel and 
Mrs. Albert E. Truby, as hostesses. The Misses Truby en- 
tertained a hundred and fifty school friends at a tea dance 
at the Presidio Officers' Club.. 

McGOWAN DINNER — Preceding the New Year's eve celebration 
at the Army and Navy Club Monday night Mr. and Mrs. 
George McGowan had a dinner party at their home, the en- 
tire coterie accompanying them to the Hotel Belvedere. White 
roses and favors, in keeping with the spirit of the evening 
brightened the dinner table. 

HOLBROOK RECEPTION— Colonel and Mrs. Lucius R. Hol- 
brook were hosts at an informal reception to the officers and 
ladies of the 9th Corps Area Wednesday at the Officers' Club 
at the Presidio to meet Major-Genera] and Mrs. W. A. Hol- 
brook. 



HOSTS AT THE FAIRMONT — Commodore and Mrs. James 
Bull were hosts to a group of the officers of the French ship, 
Jeanne d'Arc, at the Fairmont recently. California fruits and 
flowers combined artistically with Christmassy holly and 
greens formed table decorations of interesting contrast. The 
Bull party included half a dozen of the young visiting officers 
and a compliment of Americans. 

BALLS 

WHITE BALL AT BURLINGAME — The White Ball, given at the 
Burlingame Country Club recently by Raymond Armsby, like 
all of the other gorgeous events of this winter, is the tribute 
that society paid to the youth and loveliness of the new- 
comers to its ranks, the debutantes whose enjoyment has been 
all the reward that any host or hostess hoped for. The Arms- 
by ball was in honor of Miss Eleanor Martin and Miss Ger- 
trude Murphy. The beauty of the world in full bloom and 
in the glory of forest treasures have been lavished without 
stint to create backgrounds for others of the balls this win- 
ter, but somehow the snowy white simplicity of this affair, 
as if expressing itself, is conceded to have been the most 
original and lovely of all the magnificent spectacles of the 
gayest winter that society has experienced in years. 

CLUBS 

LAUREL HALL CLUB — The Laurel Hall Club resumed meetings 
this week after a brief holiday adjournment. The calendar 
for January, just out, announced a general club meeting held 
last Wednesday at the Fairmont Hotel. At 1:45 the mem- 
bers, who are finding the circle on readable books, conducted 
by Mrs. John Farnham, particularly interesting assembled 
for a fifteen minute discussion preceding the general business 
meeting at 2 o'clock. Tea and a social hour, with Mrs. Chester 
Brown as tea hostess, concluded the day's events. The Laurel 
Hall Club has sections devoted to literature, social service, 
current events, bridge, mah jongg, swimming and golf offer- 
ing many pleasant avenues of activity to the members. Mem- 
bers of the bridge section are asked to note that the dates 
of meeting have been changed to the second and fourth Fri- 
days. 

ATHLETIC CLUB — The opening of the new quarters of the Wo- 
men's Athletic Club on Sutter street Wednesday of last week 
was made the incentive for a number of luncheon parties 
with club members as hostesses. The elaborate comfort of 
the new building has made it a matter of pride to the San 
Francisco women who have interested themselves in the club 
since its inception. 

THE WOMEN'S BUILDING — Tremendous success is attending 
the membership drive now on for the Women's Building and 
the goal of 4000 members has already been passed by more 
than 2 00. Represented in the membership are every county 
of California, six outside states and two foreign countries. 
There has been a heavy demand for the out-of-town mem- 
berships among women who are looking forward to enjoying 
the privileges of residential quarters in such congenial sur- 
roundings when in San Francisco. The $50 life member- 
ships will be discontinued Tuesday and during the past few 
days cash has poured into the coffers at the headquarters 
of the Women's Building Association, fourth floor Bank of 
Italy, Powell and Market streets, for these memberships, 
which give their holders each one vote in administration of 
the organization. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

50 Bnsll Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHBX. Proprietor 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Ness Ave., at Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Butter 6180 



Under Management CARL S. STANLBT 



Januan ?. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



ESCHSCHOLTZIAS — The EschSCholtzias were hosts at a delight- 
fully arranged Christmas party Thursday evening of last week 
at the California Club Hall, 1750 Clay street, bringing to- 
gether a large number of members and their friends. Holi- 
day colors and greens made an elaborate setting. During the 
dancing Santa Claus appeared and distributed toys and favors 
to everyone. Later, a sudden rain of balloons poured down 
from the ceiling, contributing much to the gayety of the af- 
fair. A most picturesque scene was the minuet number under 
multi-colored lights. 

CALIFORNIA CLUB — The outdoor art department of the Cali- 
fornia Club welcomed home its chairman. Mrs. George T. 
Marsh, who has just returned from a motor trip through 
the East, with a "highway" luncheon in the clubrooms Wed- 
nesday of last week. Mrs. J. L. Fuller was in charge of the 
luncheon arrangements and Mrs. William Limbaugh planned 
the novel table decorations. Mrs. Marsh gave an interesting- 
account of her journey, relating incidents of her visit to 
Pike's Peak Colorado Canyon, and describing soiue of her 
experiences in Boston, New York and Washington. Only mem- 
bers of the section were in attendance and the afternoon 
was very informally spent. 

BURLINGAME CLUB — New Year's eve was celebrated this year 
with parties of all degrees of formality and informality. At 
the Burlingame Country Club there was a large Dutch treat 
dinner party, followed by a dance, while a number of house 
parties were arranged by peninsula people for the week and 
the two days following. 

CAP AND BELLS — As the opening event of the new year, the 
Cap and Bells Club celebrated with a New Year's luncheon 
and jinks, Thursday of last week in the Terrace room at the 
Fairmont. The special feature of the entertainment was the 
presentation of a pageant written by Mrs. Jesse M. Whited, 
one of the talented members of the club and a past president. 
The club members all wore fancy costumes representing some 
of the picturesque periods touched upon in the pageant. Mrs. 



YV. .1. Owens was chairman 0( the day. The Cap and Bells 
card section is making preparations for its annual benefit. 
caul party in the interests of the Woman's Building fund. The 
affair will be held at the Fairmont January 17. Mrs. Nor- 
man Walter Hall will he chairman, 

SOUOPTIMISTS — The Soroptimist Club brought the old year to 
a close with a very jolly jinx night last Saturday evening in 
the studios of Mme. Stella Raymond Vought. A Christmas 
tree, colorful with lights and gleaming decorations, held gifts 
for all the members. A program was contributed impromptu 
fashion as entertainment and a favor awarded for the stunt 
most enthusiastically received. The club added to the Christ- 
mas happiness of the sick children in the San Francisco Hos- 
pital by sending them a gift of oranges. Several boxes of 
fruit were sent to the hospital and Mrs. J. Marie Martin, 
chairman of the committee, and other members of the club 
distributed the oranges among the children. 

THE CALIFORNIA POETRY CLUB — The members of the Cali- 
fornia Poetry Club disported themselves Thursday night, De- 
cember 27th, at the studios of Mrs. Schruren, in Sutter street, 
forgetting for the while, rhyme, rhythm and feet, except for 
tripping the light fantastic. After an enjoyable program, 
which included readings by Dr. Caldwell, of his own poems, 
and Miss Louise Doran's selections from her recently pub- 
lished volume of verse, "From a Rose Jar," the evening was 
passed in dancing and a supper was served. 



LA GAITE FRAXCAISE 

The most unique theatre in San Francisco is La Gaite Fran- 
chise, and the performances to be given on the evenings of Jan- 
uary 7th to January 12th also a matinee on January 12th, will 
be unusually interesting. The play is "Le Gendre de Monsieur 
Poirier" and the players are Mrs. Constance Hart Wylie Mr. 
Wm. Mayo Newhall Jr., and Mr. Barroll McNear. Andre Ferrier 
has established in San Francisco this little theatre, based on the 
idea of the Grand Guignol and "Le vieux Colombier" in Paris, 



One Hundred and Twelfth Half Yearly Report 

The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 



SAVINGS 



INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 



COMMERCIAL 



One of the Oldest Banks in California, 
the Assets of which have never heen increased by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 



Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 
526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



DECEMEER 31st, 1923 

Assets — 

United States Bonds and Notes, State, Municipal and Other Bonds (total 

value $26,044,944.64) standing on books at $24,363,134.03 

Loans on Real Estate, secured by first mortgages 56,795,864.27 

Loans on Bonds and Stocks and other Securities 1,266,771.45 

Bank Buildings and Lots, main and branch offices (value $1,450,000.00), 

standing on books at ... 1.00 

Other Real Estate (value $50,000,001. standing on books at 1.00 

Employees' Pension Fund (value $430,275.37) standing on books at 100 

Cash on hand and checks on Federal Reserve and other banks 6,748,695.82 

Total $89,174,468.57 

Liabilities — 

Due Depositors $85,324,468.57 

Capital Stock actually paid up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,850,000.00 

Total $89,174,468.57 



GEO. TOURNY, President A. H. MILLER, Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 31st day of December, 1923. 

[SEAL] CIIAS. F. DUISENBERG, Notary Public. 



A Dividend to Depositors of FOUR AND ONE-QUARTER (4 1 4^ per cent per 

annum was declared. Interest COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED 

QUARTERLY instead of Semi-Annually as heretofore, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 

Deposits made on or before January 10th, 1924, will earn interest from January 1st, 1924. 



1MB 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 5, 1924 






FINANCIALS 



By P. N. BERINGER 

THE year 1923 in this country has been a year of ap- 
proaches to prosperity, all along the line. In most 
sections of the country there is a real prosperity and in none 
is there such a thing as real hard times. This is a most 
remarkable achievement because, with the conditions as 
they are in Europe, and with so many of the overseas 
markets closed to the manufactured and raw products of 
this country, as to export, our business with the world 
at large might well be expected to be vastly curtailed. As 
it is, our exports have increased materially and the trade 
at home has increased, by leaps and bounds. Naturally^ 
the expectation, founded on the experiences of what the 
world has gone through, after previous wars, was that we 
would have a much longer time to wait before good times 
came back to us. 

A Large Country 

'We have a very large country and we have a very large 
consumption at home of all of the raw and finished prod- 
ucts, produced in the country, in other words, we are en- 
abled to live on ourselves and are not dependent in any- 
thing like a serious way, on the products of others for ex- 
istence. There are many countries that are finding it ab- 
solutely impossible to subsist, without trade with the out- 
side world. 

* * * 

The European Situation 

"We may say the European situation is really much im- 
proved. The English have at last come to understand that 
France and Belgium will continue to firmly hold the Ruhr, 
and as much more territory as may be necessary, to guar- 
antee that Germany will pay her debt. France, in the mean- 
while, and Belgium, too, is seeing the rebuilding of its de- 
vastated regions going on with a rapidity that was not at 
all expected. Belgium has very quietly rebuilt and re- 
habilitated most of its destroyed plants and industrial units. 
France has done the same thing. And France has had to do 
this in company with Belgium, while Germany was trying 
to make the world at large believe that she was real I \ a 
bankrupt nation and could pay nothing, as to the repara- 
tions. And the world at large, to a very large extent, 
believed the lying representations of the German states- 
men. Europe is, however, recovering, and the story of the 
year is a good one, except as to Germany. 

* * * 

Mexico's Revolution 

The revolution in Mexico may be accepted as Hearing 
its end. It was a very well managed revolution and much 



y\ 


trains 


4- 


daily 

(EACH WAY) 


PORTLAND 

$48.75 

TACOMA 

$58.25 

SEATTLE 


\ Low 
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fares 

/ On sale daily 
/ until April 30 
( Return Limit 
I May 31, 1924 


$60.75 
VICTORIA 


[ Stop overs 
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VANCOUVER 
$71.00 


Shasta 
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Southern Pacific 


50 Post St. Ferry Station Third St. Station 
Phone Sutter 4000 



in. ire of an affair than have been most of the revolutions 
in Latin countries. But ( tbregon is a military man of 
great ability and the Mexicans have come to know him 
as a constructive executive. The increase in the number 
of public schools and colleges in Mexico is one of the best 
testimonials as to his ability and the aid he has given, in 
every way. toward the establishment of stronger business 
relations with all countries, is another. Today, there is, 
despite the revolution, a big trade conference going on in 
Mexico City, to which are accredited, from this country, 
representatives from most of our large cities and from the 
financial institutions of the United States. I am ashamed 
to say that, in reading the long lists of delegates, I have 
failed to come across any name of a representative of a 
San Francisco firm. St. Louis and New York figure large- 
ly by representation. 

* * * 
Senator Shortridge 

Senator Shortridge is one of the most capable men in 
the Congress of the United States, and his virility and 
dignity represents California as it has never been repre- 
sented before. He has recently introduced a resolution 
for a proposed amendment to the Constitution which will 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 

Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Juat Out 

370 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 



WIND 



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January 5, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



provide for the States to have the power to limit, or pro- 
hibit, the labor of persons under the aye of eighteen yeai >. 
This would make the law, in this respect, the same in all 

of our states and is one of the best aets ever proposed. 

* * * 

The Realtors 

The year for the realtors in San Francisco has been an 
exceptionally fine one. in the way of pecuniary results, 
and 1 ( >24 bids fair to become a still better one than 1923. 
$45,500,000 of building- permits were issued. The realty 
transfers amounted to $175,000,000. This should be an in- 
dication to those who want to know wdiat San Francisco 
has been doing- of the continued movement of property 
and of the vast amount of building that has been going on. 

* * * 
Banks and Bankers 

Probably in no year in its history has the banking busi- 
ness had such a prosperous year as 1923. The national 
banks all report good business and the other banks have 
not only the same report to make, but most of them show 
an increase in capital and an extension of branches. Money 
is easier to obtain than in 1922, although of course the se- 
curity and the credit must be good. 

File Your Statements 

And now you may begin filing statements for the income 
tax returns for 1923. The filing period ends March 15th, 
1924. And, you know that heavy penalties are provided 
in case you refuse to file a return or do not file it on time. 
You must also pay on time. Form 1040 A, heretofore used 
for reporting net incomes of $5000 or less, from whatever 
source derived, has been revised in the interests of the 
largest class of taxpayers — wage earners and salaried per- 
sons. Reduced from six pages to a single sheet, Form 
1040 A is to be used for reporting net incomes of $5000 and 



k-^s derived chiefly from salaries and wages. Persons whose 
net income is derived from a business, profession, fanning, 
sale of property, or rent, though the amount is $5000 or 
less, will be required to use the larger form. 1040. The 

use of the larger form is required also where the net in- 
come was in excess of $5000, regardless of whether from 
salary, business, profession, or other taxable sources. Copies 
of both forms may be obtained by application to, or by writ- 
ten request of. the collector of internal revenue. 

* * * 

The Golden Gate Bridge 

It is now imperatively necessary that those who are in- 
terested in seeing the big bridge built, as soon as pos- 
sible, get together with the object in view to form dis- 
tricts. The initiative is in the hands of the County Super- 
visors. It is necessary that these districts pass resolutions 
showing that the people are in favor of the bridge being- 
built. These resolutions are to be used in securing the 
permission of the War Department so that the work may 
have some practical beginning. It is understood that there 
is no governmental opposition, but certain steps must be 
followed in obtaining the final consent of the national 
authorities to span the bay. This bridge will be the eighth 
wonder of the world when completed, and it is hoped the 
cost of it is to be defrayed by private interests and this 
corporation will in turn be reimbursed by the tolls col- 
lected for the use of the structure. 



The People Own the Bridge 

The idea is the people are to own the bridge, and what- 
ever is collected in tolls will first go to the districts that 
have made the beginning possible and by the districts the 
money collected from tolls will go to reimbursing the pri- 
vate interests that have made the building of the bridge 
possible. 



CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

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COMPOUNDS 

(I Produced under 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



San Francisco Plating Works 

l:?4!)-.->l Mission St., !><■(. !>(h and 10th 

K. (5. Denniston, Prop. 

Plume Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods With Gold. Silver. 
Nickel. Brass. Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for :inil deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
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FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1026-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and (iourh 
Telephone Park 271 



VISIT 

'The 
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AT 

CYPRESS LAWN 
MEMORIAL PARK 

City Office: 995 Market Street 

San Francisco 

Phones: 

Sutter 695 Douglas 4772 

Perpetual Care Fund 
On July 1st, 1923, amounted to 

$760,669.75 



J. Spaulding & Co. 

THE ORIGINAL PIONEER 

CARPET AND 

RUG CLEANERS 

353~357 Tehama St. Tel. Douglas 3084 



KECK'S 

Prescription Pharmacies 

"Keek's Way Is the Safe Way" 

Three Pharmacies 
Fifth Floor. I 35 Stockton St. 

Second Floor. 209 Post St. 

Second Floor, 240 Stockton St. 

San Francisco 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 5. 1924 



LE/ISURE'SW^ND 




OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

lorn Moore, 



"Lightnin' " Packs Columbia 

San Francisco has waited many 
years for the promised production of 
Frank Bacon's "Lightnin'" and the 
capacity houses are not only a tribute 
to the excellent cast who played with 
Mr. Bacon through his long success 
but to his memory as well. That suc- 
cess has become history in the theat- 
rical world. Frank Bacon and Win- 
chell Smith wrote a really great com- 
edy, and then assembled a cast that 
has not grown stale after playing this 
one plav for six years. John Golden 
has brought that same cast to San 
Francisco, with the exception of the 
star, whose disappointment at not get- 
ting back "home" to California was 
shared by all of interested California. 
But Bacon's own choice of his succes- 
sor in the role of Lightnin' was Percy 
Pollock and he IS Lightnin'. Over 
three years ago 1 saw Frank Bacon 
in Xew York, and I could easily have 
believed that he was before me again, 
Pollock's impersonation of the charac- 
ter is so like Bacon's and so excellent. 
The shiftless soul, with a hankering 
for strong waters, but a heart of gold, 
who prides himself that he has never 
broken a promise, is there to the life. 
Of the splendid supporting cast, Jane 
Oaker, as Mrs. David, and Thomas 
Maclarnie as the Nevada judge, Lem- 




Wampas Week 

in San Francisco 
January 19^26 

Hotel Plaza warmly welcomes 
the Warn pas crew and assures 
them of every comfort here dur- 
ing this week of gaiety. 

M O T E l_ 



POST STREET AT STOCKTON 



uel Town'send, are particularly amus- 
ing. Add to these names. Jessie Prin- 
g!e as Mrs. Jones. Ann Merrick as Mil- 
dred Buckley. Jason Robards as John 
Marvin, Paul Stanton as Raymond 
Thomas, and then you barely have one 
half of this star cast. The setting of the 
play is an old hotel on the shores of 
Lake Tahoe. run by Lightnin' Bill 
lones and his wife. The state line goes 
through their property, and so the 
place becomes a haven for would-be 
divorcees who must complete a six 
months residence in Nevada. It is a 
delicious story, that must not be spoil- 
ed by the telling, in advance, but there 
is the comedy theme, the love theme, 
treachery, business, all tangled into a 
whole that make it a crime against 
oneself to miss. 

Holiday Bill at Orpheum 

After three weeks of mediocre shows 
at the O'Farrell St. playhouse, the Or- 
pheum management has billed a holi- 
day program that is more than up to 
standard. There are names to con- 
jure with on that bill. Xora Bayes in 
blackest type and in her second week, 
offering some of the same songs and 
one or two new ones, and with a big 
following always of Orpheum fans. 
Then there's Margaret Severn, unfor- 
tunately appearing at the end of a long 
program, when the clock says to each 
and everyone, "you'd better hurry up 
and hurry away." Margaret Severn 
will be remembered for her appearance 
with the Greenwich Follies when she 
first donned the I'enda Masks in her 
dances. She is a bewitching- dancer, 
wearing the masks in some of her 
numbers. "The Vampire," "Fury" and 
"The Silly Doll." Not to neglect the 
other sex. there is Harry Delf. Harry 
is more of a composer and more of 
comedian than a singer. That is why 
he keeps the audience in gales of laugh- 
ter, and particularly in the song with 
the red plush family album, in which 
he does a quick impersonation of some 
of the family chromos. Joseph Regan 
and Alberta Curliss are a young pair 
of singers for whom the future surely 
holds something, and who have already 
made a good impression both on the 
concert and vaudeville stage. They 
sing some of Mr. Regan's own corn- 
positions and many old favorites such 
as "Little Gray Home In the West," 
and "I Love You Truly-" Rube from 
the Country has come to San Francisco 
for the New Year's celebration in the 



person of Harry Watson in "Fifty 
Miles From Broadway." He heads a 
company of eleven, of which Reg Mer- 
ville and Olga Woods are of promi- 
nent assistance in this entertaining act. 
Les Sp'endid's roller skating act is a 
whirlwind with a novelty high table 
stunt. Hawthorne and Cooke, comed- 
ians, complete the bill of real variety, 
in a comedy duet entitled "Make Me 
Serious." 



Unusual Screen Comedy at California 

The name of James Cruze, producer, 
has in a very short time, become fa- 
miliar to every frequenter of films over 
this wide world's surface. His produc- 
tion of "The Covered Wagon" most 
firmly established his ability, and now, 
in "To the Ladies" he has added a fea- 
ther of quite a different color to his 
bonnet of successes. "To the Ladies" 
is a comedy. It is not only a good com- 
edy but it is well produced and a fur- 
ther credit to Mr. Cruze. This is no slap- 
stick comed_\. There is a real plot and 
there is an appeal to the married or 
the single, to the higher-ups and those 
who wish they were. Given one am- 
bitious wife, who wishes to make her 
husband manager of the piano factory 
where he is employed, and three as- 
pirant- for the position, and troubles 
are bound to accrue. It is a laugh pro- 
ducer from beginning to end. and that 
is why the California had to hold it 
over for a second week. The leading 
roles are in the capable hands of Theo- 
dore Roberts. Edward Horton, Louise 
Dresser, Helen Jerome Eddy, Z. Wall 
Covington, and Arthur Hoyt. On the 
same program are some interesting 
short screen subjects and a delightful 




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iKLAi 

^■W.C. cJurQens Mgr-i| 



=*» 



Januarv 5, I' '24 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



concert under the direction of Max 
Dolin. 



"Under The Red Robe" at Imperial 

Thus far only in New York and in 
San Francisco has "Under the Red 
Robe" had its premiere. Once more 
we congratulate the Rothschild Circuit 
in its accomplishments under their 
"better pictures policy." I had imag- 
ined the public might be fed up on 
costume plays and French Revolution 
plots, after the recent long run of 
Scaramouche, but apparently not. "Un- 
der the Red Robe" is too well done 
and too interesting from the historical 
and the pictorial points of view to miss. 

The stars of this version, Robert 
Bruce Mantell and Alma Rubens, are 
so firmly established in the firmament 
of the theatrical world that their names 
alone bespeak the worth of the pic- 
ture. In addition, there is the acting 
of John Charles Thomas in the role 
of Gil de Berault. Thomas plays the 
role so well that it is hard to believe 
it is his first appearance in films. Man- 
tell's Richelieu was the acme of his 
success on the legitimate and there is 
nothing lost in his acting of the crafty 
cardinal on the screen. Alma Rubens 
has all the beauty and fire to make her 
the ideal Renee of those stirring times. 
And these three head a cast of over 
3000 people. Apparently no detail of 




Demi-7cisre 

dkcloSQS tiiQ deliciousn&ss 

©wells 

1^-^ NATIONAL CREST 




time, study or expense was spared in 
the making of the costumes, and the 
settings, for they are in keeping with 
the splendor of the times. The action 
of the play never lags and Stanley 
Wey man's novel of the same name, 
from which the film was made, suf- 
fers none in the adaptation. The Im- 
perial will undoubtedly have to retain 
the film for some weeks for this is a 
worthwhile picture, and particularly 
so to those who never had the oppor- 
tunity of seeing Mantell on the stage 
as Richelieu. Mrs. John Cuddy's pro- 
logue for this picture is unusually at- 
tractive and charmingly interpreted. 



Cameo 

The White Tiger is given a very 
good presentation at the Cameo with 
Priscilla Dean in the title role as a 
female star and Wallace Beery, Matt 
Moore and Roy Griffith in the male 
parts. This film is one of the best ever 
presented here and the story is con- 
sistent and well told in the picture. 
Miss Dean is a very capable actress 
and Wallace Beery may always be de- 
pended upon to carry his part to per- 
fection. It will pay anyone to see this 
film. The incidental music by the or- 
chestra is very good. The Leather 
Pushers gives a new wrinkle in the 
discovery of a champion from a starved 
bum. The Leather Pushers is most 
enjoyable. 



The Gunfighter 

The Gunfighter at the Strand holds 
the onlooker in intense attention. It 
is a feud play and is very well put on. 
The scenes and acting are good and 
Dustin Farnum gives us the peace 
maker in a new- way. The play is a 
very strong one and the scenes are 
magnificently set. The acts move 
smoothly and naturally and the tense 
moments are well carried out. This 
is a film that is worth while. Kraus- 
grill's orchestra furnishes a program 
that was hugely enjoyed by the audi- 
ence. In addition to the Gunfighter, 
the management gave a film, the 
Swordfish, and the usual news item 
screen. 



GEO. W. CASWELL 



Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.800,000 cups were served at the P»n- 

ftma-PaclAc International Exposition. 



S. F. Symphony 

The third Popular Concert, second 
series, of the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra. Alfred Hertz. Conductor, 
bids fair to crowd the Exposition Aud- 
itorium to the doors again on Tues- 
day evening. Jan. 15, at 8:20 o'clock. 
Chairman I. Emmet Haydeti of the 
Auditorium Committee of the B 
o! Supervisors, under whose auspices 
these remarkable musicial affairs are 
given, reports that the demand for 
- with prices ranging from 23 
cents to a dollar, without war tax. is 
very large at Sherman. Clay and Com- 
pany's and that prospects are for an 



early sell-out. Particular interest cen- 
ters in the guest artist of the evening, 
Ethel Leginska, a tiny slip of a pianist 
whose artistic stature is something' 
tremendous and who stands at the very 
front rank of her profession. There is 
a burning intensity in her style and a 
fiery sweep, according- to a prominent 
critic. She will play with the orchestra 
Liszt's Hungarian Fantasie, in addi- 
tion to a group of piano solos. Con- 
ductor Hertz will open his program 
with Tschaikowski's Symphony Pathe- 
tique, No. 6, and later in the evening 
he will play the same composer's An- 
dante Cantabile, op. 2, for Strings, as 
well as Percy Grainger's "Molly on 
the Shore" and Elgar's sonorous 
"Pomp and Circumstance" March. 



San Francisco 

Symphony Orchestra 

Alfred Hertz, Conductor 

Third Popular Concert 

{Third Series) 

Exposition Auditorium 

Tues. Eve., Jan. IS, 8:20 

ETHEL LEGINSKA 

The Wo rid -Famed Pianist 
GUEST ARTIST 

Reserved Seats, .fit, 75c, 50e and 25c 

(No war tax) 

Now on Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s 

Direction Auditorium Committee Board of 

Supervisors. J. Emmet Hayden, Chairman 



"Flashy Fashions 
From France " 

A page of striking pho- 
to graphs, illustrating 
the latest modes from 
Paris, will appeal to the 
women readers of next 
Sunday's Rotogravure 
Section. Another page 
which will interest the 
women folk is 

The Woman 
On Horseback" 

showing some of the 
women who have be- 
come political tailors in 
Britain. Italy anil Amer- 
"Iu Lake County" 
shows some of Califor- 
nia's beauty spots, and, 
in fact all the worth 
while news of the world 
will be shown in perfect 
photography in The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



lanuarv 5. 1924 



DIVIDEND NOTICES 



THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

(The San Francisco Bank) 
526 California St. (and Branches). San Francisco 



SecoND speeDS 

■*4 ^fg*i|fjJf!^^ 



For the quarter rear ending December 31st. 
1923. a dividend has been declared at the rate ot 
four ami one-quarter (4V4) per cent per annum 
on all deposits, payable on and after January 
2nd. 1924 Dividends not called for are added to 
the deposit account and earn interest from Janu- 
ary 1st 1921. Deposits made on or before Janu- 
ary 10th, 1924, will earn interest from January 
1st. 1924. 

A. H. ML'LLER. Secretary. 



BANK OF ITALY 

Head Office and Branches 
For the half-year ending December 31. 1923. a 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
(4) per cent per annum on all Sayings Deposits, 
payable on and after January 2. 1924. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same 
rate of interest as the principal from January 1. 
1924. 

Deposits nade to and including January 10, 
1924, will earn interest from January 1. 1924. 
A. P. GIAN'XINI. President. 

INION TRIST COMPANY OF SAN 
FRANCISCO 

Market street at Grant avenue 
For the half-year ending December 31. L923, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all sayings de- 
posits, payable on and after Wednesday. Janu- 
ary 2. 1924. Dividends not called for are added 
to and bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from January 1. 1924. 

Money deposited on or before January In. 
192 1, will earn interest from January 1. 1924. 
F. J. BRICKWEDEL. Cashier. 

ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK 

S. Iv corner Montgomery and Sacramento Sis. 

North Beach Branch, corner Columbus ave. and 

Broadway; Columbus Branch, cor. Montgomery 

and Washington streets. 

For the half-year ending December 31. 1923. 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four and one-quarter H 1 , 1 per cent per annum 
on all savings deposits, payable on and after 
January 2, 1924. Dividends not called for will 
be added to the principal and bear the same rate 
of interest from January 1. 1924. 

Deposits made on or before January 1", 
1924. will earn interest from January 1. 1921. 
A. E. SBARBORO, President. 

HUMBOLDT BANK 

783 Market Street, near Fourth 
Bush-Montgomery Branch. Mills Bldg. 
For the half-year ending December 31. 1923. 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on savings de- 
posits, payable on and after January 2. 1924. 
Dividends not called for bear interest from Janu- 
ary 1. 1924. 

Money deposited on or before January in, 
1024. will earn interest from January 1. 1924. 
H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 



THE HIBEKNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY 

Corner Market. McAllister and Jones Sts. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1923. 
a dividend has been declared at the rat,- ,,f 
four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, 
payable on and after Wednesday. January 2, 
1924. Dividends not drawn will be added to de- 
positors' accounts, become a part thereof, and 
will earn dividends from January 1, 1924. 

Deposits made on or before January 10, 1924. 
will earn interest from January 1, 1924. 

J. O. TOBIX. Acting Secretary. 

THE FRENCH-AMERICAN BANK 

(Savings Department) 108 Sutter Street and 
Branches 

For the half-year ending December 31. 1923, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four and one-quarter (IVi) per cent per annum 
on all deposits, payable on and after January 
2. 1921. Dividends not called for are added to 
and bear the same rate of interest as the prin- 
cipal from January 1, 1924. 

Deposits made on or before January lo, 1921. 
will earn interest from January 1. 1921. 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, President. 

FIRST FEDERAL TRIST COMPANY 

Corner Montgomery and Post Sts. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1923. 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four (4) per cent per annum on all savings 
deposits, payable on and after January 2. 1924. 
Dividends not called for are added to deposit 
account and earn dividend from January 1. 
1924. 

Deposits made on or before January 10, 1924. 
will earn interest from January 1. 19*24 

M. R. CLARK. Cashier. 



Harvey Toy, Highway Chairman, Re- 
views First Year's Work 

Despite the handicaps under which 
the present California Highway Com- 
mission and its engineering forces have 
heen working during the past year. 
1923 has been <me of the biggest years 
to date in the history of road building 
in California. Highways completed 
and accepted during the year aggre- 
gate 428 miles, of which 142 miles were 
grading and surfacing, and 89 miles 
reconstructed pavements. Contracts 
are in force at the present time and 
bids are in the office for 346 additional 
miles, of which 196 are grading and 
surfacing, and 57 reconstruction of 
pavements or grade. 

Expenditures for the vear reached 
$15,542,928.76 on December 15. 1923. 
Of this sum. approximately $12,000.- 
000 bond funds spent for new con- 
struction and $3,500,000 was motor ve- 
hicle receipts expended for mainten- 
ance and improvements, Federal aid 
collected during the year amounted to 
$3,011,656.45. The amount expended 
on maintenance during 1923 is the 
largest annual expenditure for this 
work yet made by the State Highway 
Department and is evidence of the 
Commission's determination to build 
up a thorough going maintenance de- 
partment in all sections of the State. 
In this we have the hearty co-opera- 
tion of the State Highway Engineer. 

Forty-fo'e parcels of land for main- 
tenance stations and repair shops have 
been acquired throughout the State 
after careful study of the locations. 
They represent an aggregate present 
value of $328,000. Three new divisions 
have been created during the year to 
facilitate the work. It is the opinion 
of the Commissioner that never before 
have California highways heen main- 
tained as well as during 1923. The 
building up of this department has 
only just begun, but we are deter- 
mined that in the future it shall be a 
big feature of the highway work. 

The present Commission came into 
office in January, a year ago. It found 
uncompleted gaps in trunk lines and 
important interstate connections, and, 
at the same time, millions of dollars 
obligated on relatively unimportant 
inads. The bond act of 1919 has been 
interpreted to mean that $20,000,000 
must be expended on new roads and 
$20,000,000 on the former highways. 
Hearing in mind the mandates of law. 
we have endeavored to concentrate 
available funds as far as possible on 
main lines and more important high- 
ways. Before taking- action, however. 



we made personal inspections of the 
highways. The Commissioners during 
the year have traveled 15,000 miles, 
often accompanied by the Governor 
and the State Highwav Engineer. 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Tour investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1650 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect .3418 -Phones- Prospect 84 SB 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

Monte Rio 
Hotel 

Remodeled-Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rooms with Hot and Cold 

Water. 
50 Rooms with Private Bath. 
Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern GRILL on Main Floor. 

Now Open 

NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements. OFFICIAL 
A. A. A. HOTEL. Rates, American 
plan, $4 per day and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE H. CARR, Proprietor. 

Make Reservations in Advance 

See Peck Jtidah or Crabtrees 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 



I 140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 36sr, 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding: — Blacksmlthlng 

II. W. Culver M. Daberer IS. Johnson 



Carl Lconhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 11 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



C. LALAX'XE 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL 

5 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

OLD POODLE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 86G8 

Announcement 

A $1.25 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. in. 

to 9 p. m. 

Also A La Carte 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4686 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Alio Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 
FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days 91.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. $1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 
"Half Dollar" Specials 

for the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street 



Golden Gate Restaurant 

2721 Hyde Sf. Phono Franklin <i"><«> 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Afternoon Parlies a Specialty 
Dance Italian Dinner 




Adjoining Columbia and Outran Theaters 
Geary and Mason. Phone Prospect 61 




Dinner and Cabaret Every Evening 

JACK HOLLAND AND HIS FAMOUS 

BEAUTY REVUE IN LATEST 

SONGS AND DANCES 

RADIANT COLORFUL COSTUMES 

HIGH GRADE ENTERTAINMENT 



The Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er it be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 

or stationer to .. .. . _ -■ ■ --^ 

show you samples. ^ kU J *'.', :TTJ J : ■ J A JjU-j f 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1866 
41 First Street - - San Francisco 





N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



YOU CAN 




Are You 
Particular? 



2"">>r»y We Oner 

■Stingy 

Dining Car Service and Observation 
Cars With Speed and Comfort for your 
trip to Sacramento and the Sacramento 

Vt y 

For further information call 

San Francisco — Telephone Garfield 64 

Oakland — Telephone Piedmont 345 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R. 

The Scenic ISoute 



Phone Garfield :'■<> :*• Pt»lmi r Graduate 

Hours Hi to 1 and J to 8 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 
Western States Life Building 

!»;r- Mi.rU.I Street San Kntin i-.n> 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 
Bet. 18th and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San FrancUeo 



WEDDINGS A SPEC1 Mil 
Kelly's Limousine S ' Please You 

finest macli cour- 

chauffeurs. No tments. 

! 




Phone Franklin M~ 

^treet B » D Francisco 



LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



He photographed this year on your 






Birthday 






Studios in nil Principal Cltlea or < alifnrnia 
Oakland s«n Francisco 

■*'"* HIM 8fc 41 Grant Ave. 



Quality 1866-66 Vears-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following" Places: 

llurlinttitme Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodald* 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Franelnco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Kronoray Durability 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 



Bafts Praaaad ■>>• Hand. Only — 

Bafts Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaninr 
431 Mnonn St. Phone Franklin 2510 




A frfservfce 

v let tis seirve pog 



Reo passenger cars and Reo 
Speedwagons will aid you in 
making 1924 a happy year 
socially and a successful year 
financially. It will be a pleasure 
to serve you — both before and 
after you become a Reo owner. 



REO MOTOR CAR CO. 



of California 

Incorporated 



[Van Ness Ave. at Geary Street 
Phone Prospect 682 

OAKLAND BRANCH 

SUCH Broadway 

BRANCHES 

Los Angeles, Phoenix, Sacramento, 

Stockton 




Established July 20, 1856 



SAN FRANCISCO 



AND 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 



$5.00 PER YEAR 



kNUARY 12, 1924 



Five Sources 
of Revenue 

Rodeo- Vallejo 
Ferry Co. 

Golden Gate 
Ferry Co. 

Carquinez 
Toll-Bridge 

Antioch 
Toll-Bridge 

Pittsburg- 
Sacramento 
Auto Ferry 



• iV 



\JV* 



t*. 



«J" t# 



?*%><*. 



,v>°" 



if 



«** 



((JV' 



\* V 



.O .A. 






«ic .>£>* ** 



*«¥ 



&*» 



.tf" 



»"»' 



SI* 



,w 



ctfS 



A great inland water 

transportation system 

IS EXPANDING 

You can now join with the suc- 
cessful management of this great 
organization on a profit-sharing 
I a sis. 

A limited number of shares of the 
full-paid, non-assessable stock of 
the American Toll-Bridge Company 
has been allotted to California. 

The subsidiaries of this company 
that are operating under the Cali- 
fornia State Railroad Commission 
earned over JJ,200,000 in 1923 with 
large profits available for dividends. 

1 'reference as to dividends on the 
common stock to California inves- 
tors is provided for under the per- 
mit to sell in this state. 

American Toll-Bridge Company 

Underwood Building 525 Market Street 

Telephone Douglas 8745 San Francisco, California 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1923 

Assets $89,174,468.57 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 430,275.37 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J£) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation 

General 

Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

1 05 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $16,000,000 S15.000.000 Reserve Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY. MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 

Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

S17-18 California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



CHAS. J. EVANS 



Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 

and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 85c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
TYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 

W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



St. Mary's 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Pi 
For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any Incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reacli the 
nrute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk it over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system ; it takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges ; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

Practice limited to 
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours 10 to 5 — By Appointment — 

Saturday 10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4662 

Removed to Suite 537 Llebes BIdg. 

177 POST STREET 

San Francisco 




EitablUhid July tO. IM6 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. CIV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1924 



No. 2 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, Russ Building, 235 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
Calif. Telephone Douglas 0853. Entered at San Francisco, Calif., Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

— A little breath from Hades these last few frigid days 

would have seemed quite heavenly to us, wouldn't it? 

* * * 

— Male participants in the Oberammergau Passion Play 

seem to find it a good excuse for unkempt beards and heads. 

* * * 

— The present trend of modernists in art seems to be to 
get away as far as possible from the meaning they are try- 
ing ( ?) to convey. 

* * * 

— There are mathematicians who are so clever that they 
,can make even figures lie ; they are called financiers and 
,are much respected in their various communities. 

* * * 

— Argue as you will, ladies, on "This freedom" of your's, 
but it is still a man-made world, and each of you is cater- 
ing to some one of the sterner sex, — your boss or your hus- 
band. 

* * * 

— We are not at all religious, but this struck us as pretty 
fine: "God sleeps in the stone, dreams in the animal, and 
wakes in man." — From "Christianity and Progress." by H. 

E. Fosdick. 

* * * 

— Quakes to the north of us in Oregon; quakes to the 
south of us in Imperial Valley; we trust to "whatever gods 
ther.e be" in the bowels of the earth, that they'll pass us 

bv this time. 

* * * 

— Much has been said and written of the "tired business 
man"; he has been pandered to' in music, drama, ami lit- 
erature; we now arise to remark that the tired business wo- 
man should also receive consideration. 

* * * 

— At the annual dinner in London, of the Plymouthians, 
Mr. Isaac Foot, M. I'.. mentioned the fact that Lady Astor 
was a Virginian, and recalled the fact that Sir Walter Ra- 
leigh, a Plymouth man, had founded the colony of \ ir- 
ginia. He added: "If Sir Walter could have realized all the 
consequences of his act. he might have sailed in another 

direction." 

* * * 

— Lefcadio lleam possessed supersensitive olfactory 
nerves, which were a source of pleasure as well as suffer- 
ing to him. Possessing them ourselves, we suggest that it 
would be a good idea to include a course of olfactory ner\ e 
training in schools, so that the usual hideous smells per- 
taining to city streets, theaters and hotels, could be no- 
ticed bv even the ordinary inert human being; efforts being 
made, perhaps in that case, to eliminate disagreeable smells 
from public places, which are such an abomination to sen- 
sitive nostrils. 



— At one of the numerous receptions given on New 
Year's day, a certain hostess who dispensed "hospitality" 
freely, was compelled to eliminate a musical program on 
account of the possibility of its attracting the attention of 
the federal officers. In the "land of the free!" 

— The fighting forces of Mexico are recruited from the 
jails; the people revolt, are thrown into prison, and then 
are recruited to fight for the government which they have 
just revolted against! A "vicious circle," to quote a phrase 
of Woodrow Wilson's, anent an entirely different subject. 

* * * 

"It will be a wonderful spectacle." says the London Ob- 
server; "Mr. Ramsay McDonald, Prime Minister, will oc- 
cupy No. 10; Mr. Philip Snowden, we suppose will go to 
No. 1 1 ; and our astonished British Foreign Office will be- 
,hold a Labour Minister at its head." 

— "As soon as you give the excellent things of life to 
the crowd, the crowd makes them vulgar. We have ex- 
cellent music, but what is the music of the crowd? We 
have good speech, but what a vulgar thing is the speech 
of many! What of our art, of our manners, of our social 
life? There is hostility between beauty and crowds," so 
says Dr. Alexander Meiklejohn, former President of Am- 
herst College. 

* * * 

— And he goes on to say: "What shall we do about it? 
Shall we turn back and give up democracy? I don't think 
so. And one of the reasons is that we cannot even if we 
wanted to. The crowd has got its way now in certain 
things, and the man who tries to take it away in this coun- 
trv is going to get smashed to pieces, thank God." 

— The illness of Howard Carter, discoverer of King Tut- 
ankhamen's Tomb, and the consequent closing of that sar- 
cophagus until the end of January, makes one wonder if 
another victim is to be claimed. One remembers the legend 
that the Egyptians used some subtle poison in the prepar- 
ing of their dead as a protection against marauders. It is 

evidently acting! 

* * * 

— Diamond imports alone have aggregated over a bil- 
lion dollars in the last half century, in this country, and 
total sixty millions in 1923, which holds second rank in 
the history of diamond importations, according to the Trade 
Record of the National City Rank of New York. Our 
people now own about two billion dollars worth of dia- 
monds, or more than one-half the entire world's stock. 

* * * 

— Fifty thousand dollars awarded in the Bok peace prize 
contest, to the author who has merely advocated the en- 
trance of the Lnited States into the World Court, and the 
co-operation of this country with the League "under cer- 
tain conditions." Anyone might know that anything really 
lal and reallv approaching a solution of the problem 
of ending war. would be banned from such a contest. Fifty 
thousand dollars! Raw ther a large sum for an ex-editor 
to be handling! What? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



[anuary 12. 1''24 




There is an old proverb to the ef- 
What Was the Gain? feet that "things are not always 
what they seem" which Mr. Gil- 
bert in his wonderful opera, "Pinafore." elaborated very 
fully. Now. in California we are face to face with the situa- 
tion that the decision with regard to the Japanese is likely to 
prove something of a boomerang. We are not going to have 
at once the advantages, out of the law preventing them 
from holding land, which were so gaily anticipated. 

The Fresno "Weekly Times" recently said that the alien 
land law decision will be "more severe upon the white own- 
ers of land than on the Japanese." and says that the white- 
owners in Placer and San Joaquin counties are taking steps 
against the law, as laid down by the Supreme Court. Now, 
just how is this? It is stated that the values of land are 
falling, due to the operation of the law. because it will cost 
more for labor if the farmers have to employ white labor. 
Of course, one will say. "Why not employ the Japanese 
who have been obliged to quit their holdings under the 
operation of the law. as laborers?" The answer to this is. 
that if the Japanese go into farm labor for white farmers, 
they will charge the same price for their labor as the white 
laborers, and the farmers will so have no relief from the 
operation of the high wage scale. This has brought about 
the curious state of things that white farmers are. in places, 
holding meetings with the Japanese, in the hope of finding 
some way in which the Japs can be retained in the posses- 
sion of their land, the law notwithstanding. 

People who undertake the sort of movement, that has 
culminated in the decision of the Supreme Court, are su- 
premely- ignorant of nearly everything and of economics 
most of all. Anyone with a grain of sense knows that land 
is worth in proportion to its productive powers — not its 
yield-production., but the amount of money which can be 
made from it. It is clear, therefore, that the payment of 
high wages for labor to that extent diminishes the value of 
the land. So that in the law, as laid down, we have an in- 
strument which may work damage to our land values. 

An outside opinion is seen in an editorial in the last 
number of "Freeman." published in Xew York, in which is 
said: "The immediate result of a change of system may well 
be that California will pay more for fresh fruits and vege- 
tables while the rest of the country pays more for nuts 
and prunes." 

Of course, such disturbance will be but temporary, for 
the mass of settlers who must come into this community 
from all parts will rapidly take up the lands. 



The burning down of some of the schools 
Unsafe Schools in the state by a crank, in the early morn- 
ing when no one was in the building, is 
characterized by Fdward H. Hamilton as a good work in 
disguise, for says Mr. Hamilton, with perfect truth, any 
school building that "can be burned, should be burned" 
when there is no one in it. Of all the work that Mr. Hamil- 
ton has done for the public, (and in a very full and mature 
life he has done more than falls to the lot of most men) 
this last campaign of his in favor of fireproof school build- 
ings is not the least in importance, lie says most forcibly 
and truly "That there never should be built or permitted to 
survive a school building where teachers and children are 
daily put to the gamblers' chance of death." There is no one 
who will not approve of that statement and yet our tight- 
wad taxpayers grudge the money for decently safe struc- 
tures, so that our children and teachers are exposed to the 



constant risk of death by lire, in far too large a proportion 
of our schools. An agitation for absolute safety from fire. 
if it can be attained, should be set on foot. No notions of 
economy on the part of anyone, no matter how high his 
position, should be allowed to interfere with this sensible 
idea. 



Did you ever see the Bay at 
Monterey in Midwinter Monterey at the end of Decem- 
ber and all through the month of 
January? If not. you should repair the oversight at once 
and see it; if you have seen it you will agree with the 
writer that there is nothing- more beautiful anywhere in 
this old universe. Were there ever such blues and whites 
anywhere before? The sea comes in dark blue and occa- 
sionally of that purply color which no doubt led Homer to 
speak of the "wine dark sea" which to our ears, raised in 
the stormy north, seemed always a most inappropriate 
epithet, but here the truest and most complete. The surf is 
the purest white and. breaking from deep green waves, 
makes a lacy edge to the blue sea as far as "the eye can 
reach. Yes; they really are green waves; for by some sort 
of metamorphosis, due to the light, the seas, "wine dark" 
in the mass, turn to the most transparent green in the indi- 
vidual waves, as they roll on the shore. And behind are the 
mountains, dark blue and. this year, partially covered with 
snow, on their peaks. But to talk of the beauty of that 
country seems almost useless, except to encourage people 
to <ee it. One look at that Bay. with the white fishing boats, 
and the blue sea and the hills curving till the capes are lost 
in the haze out at sea. and your troubles melt awav. 



One of the best clubs for information on 
A Useful Club international matters we discovered at the 

Palace Hotel recently. It seems to make a 
specialty of the study of foreign peoples at first hand and 
if the meeting that we attended is any sample of the food 
which they offer regularly, the originators have conferred 
a real benefit on the community. Our lack of knowledge 
and interest in other peoples is somewhat of a scandal, and 
its continuance will lead to trouble as the international re- 
lations among the peoples grow more close and the neces- 
sity for mutual understanding is more exigent. At the meet- 
ing which we attended the Consul General of Chile spoke 
about his country. That is to say. he gave an account of 
the various social and political institutions of which he was 
most proud. Of course, no one will do anything else for 
his own country, which is very laudable and perfectly nat- 
ural. The Consul General is a splendid gentleman, in ap- 
pearance, manners and speech, besides being a scholar, so 
that he gave Chile a very fine framework in his own per- 
sonality. There is no doubt that the audience was much 
surprised to learn of the social and industrial institutions 
of Chile which, as far as care for the masses goes, is far in 
advance of our own community, in many respects. Those 
who came in ignorance, left with respect. 



It does seem a shame that the movie 
Fact and Shadow people are unable to make their lives 

fit in with the pictures. It may be 
argued that they do; that the pictures are for the most part 
lurid and unpleasant, and, naturally enough, the lives of 
those who take part in them have the same characteristics. 
But of late there has been a change in the tone of the 
movies, at least of the best and most successful, and this 
change has implied a certain amount of dignity in the part, 
at least. Now. the playing of dignified parts always reacts 
on the actor and gives him personally much of the advan- 
tage which proceeds from the dignity of the part. It is due 
to a recognition of this by the public that men like Garrick 
and Irving and Booth and John Drew, to say nothing of 
innumerable others, have attained recognition and have 



fanuarv 1-'. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



been accepted socially. Ii is very clear that no such recog- 
nition can possibly await the people who at times make 
Hollywood indecently known throughout the world, and 
whose very existence lias fixed a badge nl' shame on what 
might easily have been an honorable calling. There is no 
reason at all why the moving picture artist should he a ead. 
Why there should be such a persistent effort on his part to 
he one. passeth knowledge. 



The sailor wears a uniform and thus 
Like a Drunken Sailor he is signalized to all if he is drunk 
and spending- his money royally. 
But the fact is that the drunken sailor is a rarity and never 
was anything else. For the most part the sailor is not a 
man who wastes his money or casts it to the four winds. 
lie has had to work too hard to earn it. 

"Like a drunken sailor" has, however, come to be a com- 
mon enough phrase, and it is doubtful if the English speak- 
ing people will soon lose the use of it. And so it is ap- 
plied to anyone spending money easily and without a care 
as to where the money came from or how hard it was to 
earn it. 

It has been said, and it is increasingly being said, that 
San Francisco is spending money like a drunken sailor 
on the Hetch Hetchy, its water producing possibilities or 
its power creating. Just now, the authorities of the city 
have turned their attention to power producing and it is 
proposed San Francisco shall produce power at the Hetch 
Hetchy and that it shall go into the business of selling 
power in San Francisco city and county. This means the 
city must operate a plant here for the distribution of the 
power created at Hetch Hetchy and must also establish 
in San Francisco a system of poles and wires for power 
distribution. It must in addition build a line to bring the 
power to the city from the point of creation at the I fetch 
Hetchy. 

Taking it for granted there are no legal difficulties to 
be overcome as to the city's right to sell power should we 
not take into consideration the fact that there is absolute- 
ly no public cry for the power the mayor and supervisors 
seem so anxious to create and sell? Should we not quietly 
look into a situation that is already beginning to assume 
such proportions in gigantic expenditure as to call for a 
halt and an investigation? Has any one user of power ex- 
pressed any dissatisfaction at the cost of power or at its 
constancy as secured from the existing companies? 

After the I letch Hetchy power has been produced and 
is ready for delivery at San Francisco who is it who is 
ready to assure us that this power may be created in suffi- 
cient quantity to meet every demand of San Francisco? 
Competent engineers say that power in such sufficiency 
may not be produced at the Hetch Hetchy. Would it then 
be necessary for the city to turn about and BUY power 
from the companies now in the business of selling power 
to the industrial establishments of San Francisco? That 
would certainly develop a most interesting situation, 

We now have what has been termed the largest and most 
complete power producing plant in the world supplying 
an undiminished and never varying power to San Fran- 
cisco and most of the State. And we are asked to drop 
this and the other systems creating light and power and 
subscribe to a system which may. when completed, be in- 
adequate to supply the want- of the city. 

It ma) be the statement made that the city may not be 
able to supply sufficient power, from Hetch Hetchy. is 
not founded on fact but would it not be better to find out 
if (he lack of a foundation for such a statement is a fact? 

There is a well defined rumor floating about that the 
supply of water from the Hetch Hetchy will not be suffi- 
cient for the city of San Francisco and yet we are suggest- 
ing sharing this lack of supply with Oakland and other 



cities. If it is true that, owing to the provisions of the 

Raker law. we are condemned, after our stupendous work 
is completed to a lack of water, we should know this is a 
fad or not a fact. 

It is as if the building of the I letch Hetchy was some- 
thing negligible. When we consider the millions of dol- 
lars already spent and to be expended we must arrive at 
the conclusion that it is far better to be safe than sorry 
and investigate first and spend afterwards. 



When Samuel Morgan Short- 
Samuel Morgan Shortridge ridge was elected to the Sen- 
ate it certainly was not be- 
cause he was "riding on a Republican landslide." Mr. 
Shortridge had an ambition to go to the Senate and no 
man ever worked more conscientiously or earnestly to gain 
the reward he sought from his fellow citizens. He got it. 
and yet, at this late day, and after he has demonstrated, 
by his dignity and his ability, his fitness to wear the sena- 
torial togs, a California newspaper editor sees fit to at- 
tack him on account of his stand as regards aliens indis- 
criminately coming to this country. The attack is made in 
a most scurrilous and unenlightened manner, also. 

The Senator is accused of being the father of a bill 
aimed to exclude aliens and he is scored in a very common 
and disgraceful way. The paper in question is the San 
Jose News, and the offending editorial appeared in the is- 
sue of December 1st. The fact is that Senator Shortridge 
did not originate or introduce the bill in question. He heart- 
ily endorses it, however. Not only does he endorse it, but 
it is endorsed by the Native Sons of the Golden W r est, by 
the American Federation of Labor, by the American Le- 
gion, by the National Grange, and it is certainly not nec- 
essary to state that the vast majority of the people of Cali- 
fornia endorse it enthusiastically. 

The point is made against the Senator that this bill aims 
to exclude the Japanese student. Nothing is farther from 
the truth. The student, of any country, is specifically ad- 
mitted by a clause which so specifies and provides and no 
exclusion of the Japanese, or any other foreign student, is 
aimed at or intended. It would have benefited the editor 
of the News if he had read the proposed law before mak- 
ing the disgraceful attack on the Senator, whom he charges 
with "out-Heroding Herod in this matter of jabbing the 
Japanese with a red hot pitchfork." And notice this: 
"Shortridge is playing a cheap and dirty game." And, 
again, "such proposals as this lead towards war; American 
college education for Japanese leads towards peace and civ- 
ilizatii m." 

This proposed law will most probably pass, as it con- 
tains many elements that will tend to make the country 
safe against wholesale settlement by undesirables from all 
parts of the world. It was drafted and introduced bj Hon- 
orable Albert Johnson, of the I louse Committee on Immi- 
gration, and by Senator Heur\ Cabot Lodge, of the Sen- 
ate Committee on Immigration. Senator Shortridge could 
stand solidly behind this law as a single argument for elec- 
tion to any office the people of California had in their gift 
and he would be elected. 



— Have von noticed the curious lethargy which appears 
to prevail after the new year has begun? Even the post- 
office feels it and there is a sort of listlessness which shows 
that the holiday has been a bit too much. To snatch at 
amusement in the midst of work, as is necessary at our 
Christmas and New Year's festivities is a strain. This can 
be easily seen by a perusal of the death notices and pick- 
ing out the men of middle life who succumb suddenly at 
this time. The strain kills them and is too much for every- 
body. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 12. 1924 




' HEtfRPIT? 



— An ingenious insurance salesman had secured a policy 
and a nice commission from a difficult client. He was 
about to congratulate himself when hack came the policy. 
"Not approved by Home Office." One important question 
had not been answered. "If your father is not alive, give 
cause of his death " After much questioning and sug- 
gesting the client said in a whisper: 

"My father was hung in the Civil War as a spy. We 
never mention it." 

"Good Lord, man. that's easy enough." said the sales- 
man. Taking the application he wrote in this answer: 

"Fell from a scafford. Death instantaneous." 

— Pat was in the main a good husband and father, and 
was well liked in his neighborhood, but occasionally lie 
would go on the spree, while his large family got along as 
best they could. When his unexpected death came, the 
neighbors were shocked, and a kindly woman, chatting 
over the fence with Pat's wife, proceeded to comfort her 
by telling of Pat's good points. "He was such a man of 
principle." said the neighbor. "And am I not the one to 
know it?" replied the bereaved wife. "Sure and every Sat- 
urday night from the first day we were married didn't he 
come home and place his pay envelope in front of me as 
regular as a clock? Not a week did he miss all the time we 
were married. Of course, the pay envelope was always 
empty, but look at the principle of the thing!" 

— A group of men were playing poker in a Texas town. 
One of the players, Texico Jack, was noted for his slick 



THE 



CROCKER NATIONAL BANK 



OP SAN FRAXCISCO 



CONDITION AT Til K CLOSE OF BUSINESS, 
December 31, 198S 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts $24.88-1.2 IT. 09 

U. S. Bonds and Certificates 10.078.685.48 

other Bonds and Securities 261.338.52 

Capital Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of San 

Francisco - - 225. 1.00 

'list -is Liability under Letters of Credit 2,267.116.20 

Cash and .Sight Exchange 12.543,431.88 

J50.25U.819.17 
LIABILITIES 

Capital $2,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 7.278.605.67 

Circulation 2.000.0011.00 

Letters of Credit 2.130. 030.41; 

Deposits 36,551.183.04 

$50,2511.810.17 



Jas. J. Fagan.Vice-Pres. 
J. B. McCargar. Vice-Pres. 
Win. W. Crocker, Vice-Pres. 
F. G. Willis. Cashier 
a. W. Ebner. Asst. Cashier 
B. D. Dean. Asst. Cashier 
J. M. Hasten, Asst. Cashier 



OFFICERS 

WM. H. CROCKER, President 

D. J. Murphy, Asst. Cashier 



A. C. Read, Asst. Cashier 
W. D. Lux. Asst. Cashier 
J. A. Rounds. Asst. Cashier 
Edward T. Harrison. Asst. Cash. 
H. C. Simpson. Mgr. Frgn. Dept. 
H. H. Haight.Asst. Mgr. Fn. Dept. 



G. Feris Baldwin, Auditor 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Wm. H. Crocker George W. Scott S. F. B. Morse 

Templeton Crocker R. S. Moore J. B. McCargar 

Jas. .J. Fagan Chas. E. Green A. G. Griffin 

William W. Crocker 



methods in handling the cards. Texico Jack observed that 
one of the players kept his eyes steadily f\xe<\ on the cards 
whenever it came Jack's turn to deal. Finally. Texico 
Jack became irritated at so much attention being given to 
his deal. He complained that such close scrutiny was dis- 
courteous and suggested that the player attend to his own 
business. To this the watchful one replied: 

"I have seen you play in a number of games, and take 
it from me. that whenever a player is watching you deal, 
he is attending to his own business." 

* * * 

— A party of ministers were attending a Presbyterian 
conference in Scotland, and, having a spare afternoon, sev- 
eral of them set off to explore the district. Presently they 
came to a river spanned by a temporary bridge. Not ob- 
serving a notice that the structure was unsafe, they started 
to cross it, whereupon the bridge-keeper ran after them in 
protest. "It's all right." declared one of them, "we're Pres- 
bvterians." "I'm no caring aboot that." was the reply, 
"but if ye dinna get off the bridge you'll all be Baptists." 

— The motor car was a thing unknown to a native of 
an out-of-the-way part of Alaska, and he was astonished 
one day when he saw one go by without any visible means 
of locomotion. 

His eves bulged, however, when a motorcycle followed 
closely in its wake and disappeared like a flash around a 
bend in the road. 

"Gee whiz!" he said, turning to his son. "who'd'a's'posed 
that thing had a colt?" 

* * * 

— The two men chanced to meet at the club. "Did my wife 
make a speech at the meeting this afternoon?" inquired one. 
"Well, I don't believe I ever met your wife." replied the 
other, "but a tall, distinguished-looking woman got up and 
started by saying that she couldn't find words to express 
her feelings." "That wasn't my wife." retorted the other. 



REPORT OP CONDITION' OP 

The Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 

AT THE CLOSE OF BUSINESS, DECEMBER 31, 1923 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts $ 57.342.638.110 

O. S. Bonds and Certificates 9,707,511.44 

Bonds an Securities 10.840.825.88 



Banking Premises 

Other Assets 

Customers' Liability on Acceptances 

Commodity Drafts in Transit $ 1.701.061.83 

Cash and Sight Exchange 24.413,999.25 



1.766.035.0U 

631.737.84 

5,6211.575.43 

26.115,061.08 



$112 
LIABILITIES 

Capital stuck $ 5 

Surplus and Undivided profits 3 

circulation Outstanding 3 

Rediscounts with Federal Reserve Bank 

Bills Payable against Government Securities .... 

Acceptances sold with our Endorsement 

Bonds Borrowed 

1 ither Liabilities 

Acceptances 

Deposits — 





.022 
,999 
.170 
.150 
370 
450 
679 
.620 
.970 



000.00 

453.67 
992.50 

.1111 

mill, mi 
117.76 
000.00 
563.44 
575.14 
682.86 



Liabilities against Letters of Credit Issued, 
but not yet drawn against $7,343,558.08 

DIRECTORS 



$112,042,385.66 



ROBERT DOLLAR. President. 
Dollar .Steamship Co. 

K. R. KINGSBURY, President, 
Standard 1 111 <'o. of Calif. 

CHAS. C. MOURE. President, 
1 'has. C. Moore & Co. 

M. FLEISHHACKER. Presi- 
dent. Great Western Power 
Co. 

R. D. ROBBINS, JR.. Presi- 
dent. Bank of Suisun 

Al'oLFO STAHL. Exporter 
and Importer 

HERBERT FLEISHHACKER. 
President 

WM. F. HUMPHREY. Attorney 
W. E. WILCoX, Vice- 



MOSES A. GUNST, Capitalist 
JOHN D. SPRECKELS, Presi- 
dent J. D. Spreckels & Bros. 
Co. 
SIC. STEK.V, Levi Strauss & 

Co. 
A. W. FOSTER. Capitalist 
J. J. MACK. Capitalist 
J. C. MeKIN'STRY. Attorney 
C. F. HUNT, Vice-President 
M. MEYERFELD, JR.. Capi- 
talist 
WALTER E. BUCK. Capitalist 
PAUL SHOUP, Vice-President. 
Southern Pacific Co. 
President and Cashier 



January 12, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



A Production in Gold of 
$800,000,000 



THIS is the production within a twenty-five mile 
radius of Banner Mountain, Grass Valley Min- 
ing District, Nevada Co., Cal. 

Mines in the Grass Valley District have been 
producing since 1851. 

WHAT HAS THE ORIGINAL INVEST- 
MENT IN THESE MINES PAID IN DIVI- 
DENDS? 

It is common knowledge that one mine in par- 
ticular has twenty-five years ore reserves in sight. 

THE GRASS VALLEY EXTENSION MINES 
CO. has 1700 acres of mineral land in this district. 
We have the recognized extension of the veins 
coursing through the district, which is evidenced by 
fourteen outcrops. The structure of the vein mat- 
ter and enclosing walls are identical with produc- 
ing mines. This geological formation has produced 
millions to great depth. Mines are operating on both 
ends of our property. Ninety-five acres adjoining 
us was sold for $275,000. WHAT SHOULD OUR 
GROUND BE WORTH? Other operators appreci- 
ate the value of this ground and the amalgamation 
of various holdings was consummated after months 
of diligent, untiring efforts on the part of the di- 
rectors of this corporation. This ground has in- 



creased in value many times through the renewed 
activity in the district, occasioned by a more fav- 
orable operating expense compared with war prices. 

The chief thing to consider in making an invest- 
ment of this kind, is to choose a property in a district 
which has been proven — a company that is offi- 
cered by men who know mining, and who are 
known for their integrity and ability. See our maps 
and reports, which are sworn to before a notary 
as being correct and authentic, that you may be- 
come fully aware of the excellence of this offer and 
you undoubtedly will reach the logical conclusion 
that 

GRASS VALLEY EXTENSION MINES CO. 

Presents 

What may easily be considered one of the finest in- 
vestments of its kind ever presented. 

This is a California Corporation 

and is inviting you to participate in financing 250,- 
000 of its capital stock on a fifty fifty basis. This 
is not promotional in any sense of the word, but a 
business proposition, which under proper develop- 
ment should yield enormous profits. The only way 
to explain the possibilities of this offering clearly 
is through a personal visit to our office. 



Now is the Time to Act 
So Act Immediately 



Grass Valley Extension 
Mines Co. 

129 Fremont Street 

San Francisco, California 

Telephone Douglas 2689 



L_ 



C OUPON 

GRASS VALLEY EXTENSION MINES CO. 
129 Fremont Street San PnmdBOO, t'alif. 

Please send, without obligation on my part, full infor- 
mation on the investment opportunity offered by your 
company. 

Namt 

Telephone 

AJJreis 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



lanuarv 12. V>24 



TownMLCrier 




WHO THEDEWLABT THOU 
'ONE THATWILL PLAV THE 
DEVIL.StR WITH VOU" 

Sfiakspeare- t 



— Things turn out so differently than they appear at first. 
We have been congratulating ourselves that we had one 
of the best conducted City hospitals in the world and that 
the management was worthy of the building which we 
erected. Now it turns out that the said management is. 
to say the least, under suspicion. Charges of ill treatment 
of aged patients are freely made. We do not know, of 
course, and the matter is to be threshed out, but the fact 
that such charges should even be considered in connection 
with an institution of the kind is a reflection on the rest 
of us. 

¥ * * 

— Hetch Hetchy power will be in a condition to market 
one year from now. say the optimists and the agitator press 
quotes the statement as if it were gospel. But those of us 
who are used to public affairs are not gulled so easily and. 
with the experience born of long- observation, we venture 
to predict that a year from today will still find the mat- 
ter in suspense and perhaps a can of scandal will be tied 
i 'tit" it. We must admit that we are a little sceptical as to 
the ability of a committee of politicians to handle affairs 
of such magnitude. 

* * * 

— When the history of California comes to be written 
much attention will have to be given to the highway con- 
struction of this period which probably surpasses in extent 
any hitherto done anywhere during the same time. So 
far there does- not seem to be any evidence of graft. That 
makes the record Suspiciously good; but we fear the po- 
litical Greeks, even when they bring gifts. Let us look to 

the future without fear but with a natural scepticism. 

* * * 

— The water supply, with respect to Hetch Hetchy. is a 
troublesome business. It would be much easier in the hands 
of some great concern which would be answerable to the 
state and would have the natural incentive of reasonable 
profit to carry it along. Somehow or other these great 
municipal efforts do not seem very compatible with our 
existing system. This is without any criticism of their ab- 
solute value but merelv of their present timeliness. 

* * * 

— Says one authority, no less than the president of the 
American Bar Association. "The form of government is 
being changed from a republic into a political and hysteri- 
cal chaos." Lord, but he should live here and see what a 
mess our so called progressives have made out of it and 
speculate on what will happen if people like William Kent 
and that new bunch of radical desperadoes have their way. 
We recommend for the study of the present situation the 
life of Joaquin Murieta now running in a local paper. 

* * * 

— Judge Michael J. Roche is to be the new presiding 

judge. We are glad to see it. He lias shown himself a very 
painstaking and strong judge, unswayed by partisanship 
and accomplished in his business When a man rises up 
from the ranks like that and fulfills his duty thoroughly 
and without dramatics it restores our somewhat waning 

faith in democracy. 

* * * 

-Life plays queer pranks. On December 17 it appears 
that a man was picked up at Third and Howard in a dazed 
condition and the chances are. that he is a member of the 
Chichester family and perhaps Lord Tetnplemore. What 
were the intermediate steps between an English country 
bouse and Third and Howard in San Francisco? 



— And so the old Harrison Street Bridge has gone and 
the tired commuter will not have two chances to get home 
after midnight. That Alameda Ferry was a godsend to 
belated Oaklanders, and many is the famous man who has 
gone a well-lit-up way by it in the late hours. On the 
other hand, the delay caused by the opening of the bridge 
has ruined many a disposition and made trouble in the 
office in the morning. Yes, even the Harrison Street Bridge 
had its drawbacks. This was to be expected seeing that it 
was a drawbridge. 

* * * 

— There is something really funny about the number of 
arrests made in connection with the Pergola Cafe robbery 
of months back. Xow and again somebody is hauled in. 
brought at great expense up here and discovered not to 
be the party wanted. This shot-gun method of detective 
work is possibly effective in the long run. but it does seem 
to be lacking in finesse and would imply that the staff work 
at headquarters is not all that it should be. 

* * * 

— It turns out that some of the buildings on Broadway. 
Oakland, were built sixty years ago. They look it. The 
appearance of that street is a chronic disgrace. Fred L. 
Button gave pictures the other day of the city as he knew 
it sixty years ago. and some of the shacks that were then 
in existence are perfectly identifiable today. We some- 
times despair of our own progress but when we look at 
Oakland we take heart of grace. 

* * * 

— I cannot help wondering when the tendency to g 1 

manners which is growing in this community will strike the 
federal offices. The demeanor of the ordinary state official 
is much improved but the federal hangers on are as surly 
and crude as thev ever were. Our customs officers are 
noted throughout the world for hoorishness and the same 
sort of unnecessary and brutal coarseness invades even the 
precincts of the federal courts. 

* * * 

— A woman and a child are said to be the prey of a local 
hypnotist. Without taking any stock in the hypnotism 
part of the business, there are a lot of people here, more 
than one would suppose, who prey on other people by means 
of the exercise of what they call occult powers, which after 
all are little but the exercise of an unscrupulous will. It 
is hard to say how this can be met. 

* * * 

— We hate to suggest any new laws. But what can be 
done to recompense the breadwinner of a family who has 
been utterly incapacitated by a careless driver who has no 
money? These cases occur quite often and some of them, 
with the most painful after effects upon the man and those 
dependent on him. Some notice should be taken of a sit- 
uation of this sort. 



4*2 



Savings Accounts 



Satisfactory Service 

108 Sutter St. 
Just Above Montgomery 



BANK WITH 

The French American Bank 

(Member Federal Reserve System) 



Commercial 



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Branches 
1009 Grant Ave. 
Third St. and I'ulou Ave. 
Savings deposits made to and 
including January Tenth, re- 
ceive interest from .January 
First. 



Savings 



4*2 



on 
Accounts 



anuarv 1". 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Musical Review for the Year 

By CHARLES WOODMAN 
Music Editor San Francisco Call 



nX EPOCH was reached in the musical his- 
tory "f San Francisco at the opening- of the 
present season with the performances of 
grand opera at Exposition Auditorium by the 
city's "own" company, assisted by some of the lead- 
ing- stars of the New York Metropolitan and a great 
chorus of 150 voices recruited from the Bay Cities 
under the direction of Gaetano Merola. 

This was the result of months of preparation that 
involved not only the training of the choir, hut the 
building-, practically, of an opera house inside the 
auditorium, the selection of a repertoire that would 
give the people new works as well as some of the 
standard operas, and the creation of artistic stage set- 
ting's and effects, which was accomplished under the 
direction of Ray Coyle. 

This definitely put San Francisco on the map as a 
producing- center for grand opera, ranking with New 
York and Chicago, and it was accomplished through 
the efforts of the members of the San Francisco Opera 
Association for 1923, of which Timothy Healy was 
chairman. That it was a financial as well as an ar- 
tistic success was largely due to the work of Selby 
C. Oppenheimer, who was the business manager, with 
whom was associated Howard G. Hanvey as publicity 
director. 

Hest of all, the company is to be a permanent in- 
stitution, plans being already well under way for next 
year, when it is expected there will be a longer sea- 
son, entirely supported by the public, and. as before, 
giving everyone an opportunity to hear the best of 
grand opera at prices all can afford to pay. 

With Alfred Hertz beginning his ninth year as di- 
rector, the San Francisco Symphony < Irchestra init- 
iated the season of l <: >23-4 at the Curran Theater Oc- 
tober 26, with larger patronage than any previous 
year and almost the same personnel as last year. The 
season will continue until the latter part of March, 
with regular symphony concerts every other Friday 
and Sunday and popular programs on the alternate 
Sundays. In addition the orchestra is giving a -cries 
of "pops" at Exposition Auditorium by arrangement 
with the Supervisors' committee of which J. Emmet 
Hayden is chairman, besides other performances across 
the May and elsewhere. 

Victor Lichtenstein, a member of the symphony and 

a distinguished musician, has added considerably to 
the enjoyment of the symphonies by a series of lec- 
tures — Symphonylogues, he calls them — which he 
gives at noon preceding the regular Friday concerts, 
in Sorosis Club hall, at which he elucidates the themes 
and structure of the great works much to the edifi- 
cation of large audiences. 

Perhaps the best and certainly one of the greatest 
indications of the growing appreciation of music in 
San Francisco was given during the third observance 
of "Music Week," October 30 to November 4. which 
certainly was the most enthusiastic of the three held 
here under the direction of a committee appointed by 

Mayor James Rolph Jr., with Chester V Rosekrans, 

of the Community Service and Recreation League, as 
director of acti\ ities. 

There were at least one hundred smaller affairs in 
the various public schools during the week, besides 
about thirty in the Public Library auditorium under 
the auspices of the University of California Extension 
Division, which is doing a great work in promoting 



the study of music through its correspondence course. 

There were also concerts in all the parochial schools, 
while the pupils at those institutions joined in another 
great affair in the Auditorium under the direction of 
Rev. Ralph Hunt. 

It was a great celebration worthy of a great city 
and increased considerably the public appreciation of 
music, as is evident from the growing patronage for 
all public recitals by the great artists who are filling 
dates here. 

A few years ago one or two concert man-agers found 
it difficult to obtain adequate support for their efforts 
in bringing great artists to San Francisco. Today 
there are five engag-ed in this business, besides those 
who devote their energies to the exploitation of resi- 
dent musicians and singers. 

One of the great features of this season, not only 
for San Francisco, but for the whole United States 
and Canada, was the achievement of a San Francisco 
manager, Frank W. Healy, wdio, with the backing of 
Archbishop Edward J. Hanna, succeeded in bringing 
here the Pope's famous Sistine Chapel Choir, direct- 
ed by Monsignor Antonio Rella, whose singing was 
so superb that it aroused many to a realization of the 
opportunities that are missed with the absence of a 
local choir of sufficient size to present oratoric and 
similar works satisfactorily. 

However, San Francisco is to have a great choir, 
for one occasion at least and it is hoped that it. too. 
like the opera company, may be made permanent. This 
choir is now being selected at the suggestion of .Alfred 
Hertz and will be trained to take part in a great 
music festival with the Symphony ( hxhestra next 
May. 

Some of the regular series of concerts for this sea- 
son, which already have become established features 
of the musical life of the city are: Selby Oppenheimer's 
Sunday afternoon concerts at the Columbia Theater, 
The i'.lwyn Bureau's Artists series at the Curran on 
alternate Fridays, Alice Seckels' Monday Musicales at 
the Hotel St. Francis and Ida G. Scott's Fortnightlys 
at the same hotel, while the Colbert concert course is 
being given at the Plaza. 

Two women concert managers are also doing a great 
deal for resident artists. Madam Stella Raymond- 
Vought gives occasional concerts at Fitzgerald Me- 
morial Church, where she introduces artist students 
as well as local men and women of established repu- 
tations. 

Alexander Saslavsky, who last year directed the 
People's Symphony Orchestra, this season directs the 
Symphonic Ensemble of San Francisco, a new organ- 
ization. 

This i- a bod) of fifteen first-class musicians. They 
are devoted to the presentation of the unusual in 
music — vv i irks that come between the scope of the 

Syinphom Orchestra and the Chamber Music Society. 
These, then, are the high lights of the musical world 
of San Francisco. Besides there are recitals on the 
great municipal organ at Exposition Auditorium, of 
which Uda Waldrop is official organist: Sunday con- 
certs by the Golden date Park and the Municipal bands 
and Monday afternoon concerts, midweek concerts — 
concerts all the time, sometimes two and three of an 
evening, while a great army of young folk are train- 
ing at the various colleges and under individual teach- 
ers to carrv the gospel of music far and wide. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tanuary 12, 1924 




By ANTISTHENES 

— Cabinet makers seem to be the busiest craft over in 
Europe these days. 



— The ignorant often rush into success where the learned, 
sensing failure, fear to tread. 



— Turkey is modelling- accurately after western civiliza- 
tion : a recent law allows the Turk but one wife — unless 
the case is "urgent" ! 



— There is money in it for the man who "ill publish a 
glossary to unravel terms used by newspaper critics in their 
write-ups of things musical. 



— What is "abatement"? Hearing of it so often, we 
cruised about all of one day in search of an "abated" prem- 
ises, but concluded it must be simply theoretical. 



— In proposing a constitutional amendment granting 
equal rights to men and women. Senator Curtis of Kansas 
must have in mind that men will be given the same rights 
as women. 



— In San Francisco six arrests were made Xew Year's 
Day for violating the prohibition law. Had all the violators 
been gathered up, the big celebration would have been an 
indoor affair. 



— I, os Angeles news item. — Home of John S. McGroarty 
burned after the last of the 5000 guests had departed. — Do 
things big down there, eh? Mac's place must have been 

some auditorium ! 



— To Mabel Normand's, "Well, mv God! What business 
has the man (Keeley) got in my bedroom?" Keelev could 
logically and grammatically retort : "Why, Mabel, what 
were vou doing in Courtland's bedroom?" 



— For fraud Alton A. Cannon. 10, j s "sentenced" to Boon.,- 
ville Reformatory, Mo., until he is 21. Coupled with what 
he now knows, his two years' "schooling" there should well 
fit him for future larger enterprises. 



— Another Community Chest drive is on. Barring cities 
in Mexico, and Constantinople, San Francisco appears to 
have more mendicant-lined thoroughfares than any town 
we've ever been in; why the chest? 



— William Searecy, formerly Xo. 11.451 at Folsom peni- 
tentiary, and previous guest in five other similar institu- 
tions, says Folsom can not be equaled for poor accommo- 
dations. We'd like to hear his opinion a few years hence. 



— And speaking of the prohibition raid on the Silver ave- 
nue cafe Xew Year's Eve, it's outrageous that a district 
attorney and a few city policemen can not partake of their 
little repast without revelers' invading their sanctuary with 
illicit liquors and attendant rudeness. 



— The Congressional Directory is out; it contains the 
"biographies" of the six hundred members in Washington; 
only these six hundred read it — and then only the hokum 
pertaining to themselves; the taxpayer is nicked again for 
the bill of publishing this big brother to the San Francisco 
Municipal Record. 



— H. A. Keeley, arrested in Los Angeles for shooting 
Cortland G. Dines, claims he did so in defense of Mai. el 
Normand, who was being "bothered" by the injured man. 
Dines must have been acting quite outrageously when he 
"bothered" Mabel ! 



— France has loaned 400,000,000 francs of Uncle Sam's 
money to Jugoslavia and some other little fellows round 
about. As they are paying her more than the 4yi per cent 
we're charging her. it's only natural we'll have to whistle a 
long time for ours — there's some kick to flashing the other 
fellow's coin. 



HELPING OUT THE CHIEF 

Chief O'Brien has received $30,960 for additional police- 
men, and, after reviewing the festival of auto driving vio- 
lations, the holdup men's protracted field day and the in- 
auguration of our general winter crime carnival, we're 
for the chief and were willing to give him a lift if the su- 
pervisors couldn't have done so. 

In battle, the wise little generalissimo has. so to say. 
tucked up his sleeve what are termed reserves, who are 
subsequently invited to be slaughtered and to slaughter 
when the shock troops are no more or not much. The 
police force is a militant body; the regular police are the 
shockers, worn out by the heat of day or the heft of their 
broadcloth uniforms; we have a reserve force who have 
been in reservation for Lord knows how long, and, in this 
hour of need, to these Generalissimo O'Brien may turn for 
succor. 

Let's see, he needs $30.960 ; we could have advanced him 
$45. 522 — without his having to bow his military bearing be- 
fore any such non-combatant division as the board of su- 
pervisors, lie has in his office force, doing bookkeeping 
and oilier white-collared tasks degrading to the brawny 
hand, of these huskies, twenty-one (count them) coppers; 
these draw down the 45 thou, aforesaid mentioned and he 
can easily fill these places with clerks at less expense and 
more efficiency and release these well rested factors to 
succor their hard pressed brethren out where criminals are 
in high dudgeon. And. incidentally, as far as we know. 
the Bureau of Municipal Research, whom the employment 
of an extra clerk or an additional street-sweeper is sure 
to throw into paroxysm of holy, though well-heeled, hor- 
ror, has never pressed this change. It seems their inquisi- 
torial nets were constructed to snare minnows — porpoises 
may disport at will over and under their well set snares. 
So, without fee and for the good of our city, we will usurp 
the province of the Bureau and make a further practical 
suggestion. That 45 thou, being done with, we shall pro- 
ceed to step on another bunnion : the chief receives $9000 
a year for "incidentals." and as most of the expenses of the 
department are accounted for, why not use part of the 
"nine" for a few extra policemen? We might step on a 
minor corn by also suggesting the bluecoat in the Tax 
Collector's office is not quite employed and might fit in 
somewhere in the scheme of metropolitan defense. An- 
other wisdom tooth extracted, and we are ready for ap- 
plause or ambulance: we have "on the force" an array of 
trick nags that are principally horseflesh and ostentation; 
these, with their board, lodging, stablemaiding and hoof 
wear cost, according to the latest figures published, $37,- 
836.48 for the year! This sum would maintain a fleet of 
motorcycle police and further the efforts of the health de- 
partment. 

Here, therefore, chief, is an available total of $92,358.48; 
you asked, for $30.' ) 60; gratuitously we proffer more than 
your heart craved! Don't mention it. old topper — our re- 
ward is in civic duty done and any time we can further 
assist we're here — and there a million on practical sugges- 
tions. 



January 12, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




By KEM 



T. 



arc not made for furniture, but there is noth- 
ing that so beautifully furnishes a house. A little li- 
brary, growing each year, is an honorable part of a 
man's history. It is a man's duty to have books. A 
library is not a luxury, but one of the necessities of 
life." — Henry 'Ward Beecher. 

THIS is the season for resolves; "I'll read something 
worth while this year," decides the fair reader in plati- 
num furs and trips up the inviting- chrome yellow stairs 
to the Fiction Library and asks for "the Best Seller that 
everybody's rending and talking about and that's just out 
and hard to get." The chances are she will be given THE 
ABLE MCLAUGHLIN'S by Margaret Wilson, because it 
just won the Harper's prize; or if her taste is for the pinch- 
beck. THE BLIND BOW BOY by Von Vechten ; or Till: 
LUMMOX by Fannie Hurst, if she prefers sordid realism. 
But how the booksellers laugh at these so-called "best- 
sellers." To quote Charles Willis Thompson in the C. S. 
Monitor': "The best sellers this year and every vear are 
Dickens, Thackeray, Scott, Dumas, Victor Hugo, ave, and 
though you little think it — Charles Beade, Charlotte Bronte, 
George Eliot, Jane Austen and Balzac. I omit Shakespeare, 
because so many people buy him. to put, in swaggering 
covers, on a shelf. . . . You can't find out how manv buy 
him to read, or how many just to increase their frontage. 
Of late Fielding has been getting into the class with his 
fellows; in the nineteenth century he suffered an eclipse 
.... though Thackeray confided that Fielding was the only 
English novelist who dared to portray, with good and bad 
qualities alike, 'a man.' 

"Now, probably there were fifty or sixty others writing 
best sellers in Dickens' day. . . in Scott's day how many 
best sellers were there, all gone now but Scott? Go 
back further yet, and you shall find Richardson remem- 
bered only because Fielding made fun of him, and of all 
that generation none remembered even by name. 

"If you had lived in Pickens' heyday, or in Scott's, and 
had read every month of these other wonderful men and 
women, each hailed as a best seller and a god. you would 
have been confused. . . . you might have ended by passing 
Dickens by . . . have read somebody else who was touted 
on even terms with the great master; for how would you 
know which was the master, when the critics of that day 
spent about as much space on one as another? 

" \nd so it goes, from generation to generation; and ours 
is no exception. The weeds outnumber the flower-; per- 
haps, indeed, there are none but weeds. . . . Perhaps fitty 
\ ears from now people will still be reading Robert \\ . 
Chambers, and perhaps he will be as unknown a- George 
Gilfillan, who was a great literary autocrat in the fifties 
of the last century, and who is forgotten now. Hi- noil 
made or unmade manv a contemporary. Honest now ! Did 
you ever hear of the great Gilfillan? 

"Read the be-t books first; mil max not have time to 
read them all. ... If you look ruefully at the pile of boi ks 
tumbling liourK out of the presses, you xxill never come 

to a decision. People pluck you hx the elbow : this min- 
ute you positively must read Russian book-, the next min- 
ute romance and adventure is in style. It seems but yes- 
terday that you were a laughing stock because you had not 
read Mary Johnston or Marx Chohnondclcx . or somel 
anil w here are thex now ? 

"There stand the best books which Thoreau commended 



to you all. neatly winnowed by time and arranged in 
five toot shelve-. . . . Come away from this learned quarrel 
about who is the greatest. . . who all write, as Edmund 
Gosse points out with an iron grin, exactly alike. You rant 
miss if you turn to Browning or Tennyson or Swinburne 
.... read from the great Alexander about his unfailing 
musketeers, or — if your taste is not for victon read from 
the great Victor of his godlike convicts; and if your taste- 
is for abhorrent things, turn to the Shakespearean Honore 
and read the human comedy set forth as no one can do it 
for vnu in 1923. This be your motto: 'Let Time do it.'" 



— Where are the noises of yesterday? ( )nly then and the 
canditorial boys — and girls — were vociferously prophesying 
dissolution of municipal government should they be not 
elected! All is quiet along Van Ness tonight and it would 
be anyhow despite anyone's getting in or out; the horn and 
cushions don't run your motor. 



— Functioning without charge to association members 
or to employers, the employment department of the San 
Francisco Y. M. C. A. in 1923 found jobs for 2040 men, 
according to the annual report of George H. DeKay, |r.. 
head of the bureau, filed this week. 



Wedding: Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 

Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained gj 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAIL ELDER'S LIBRARY * 

239 Post Street San Francisco | 

SBHBBHBBSHBBBBHBHlSBHBBBBBHBBllBBBBBBBSlBHBBEISBg 




MARY HERETH 



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Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Mti nil furl urir* of 
RIVETED STEEI. P1TE. TANKS, (I I. VERTS. FUMES, 

rENsTorus. i;ashoi.i>i;rs. smoke stacks, etc. 

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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 19, 1924 




BUSY CUPID 

MISS LUCY HANCHETT has set the date tor her marriage to 
Mr. Vincent K. Butler Jr. for Saturday, February 23. The 
wedding will occur at the Hanchett home in Montecito, and 
will be in the late afternoon. Miss Alice Hanchett will lie 
her sister's maid of honor, and Mr. Nelson Hackett will be 
the best man. A number of relatives and friends will go 
south from here for the wedding. The date follows a holi- 
day. Washington's birthday, so it is probable that more San 
Francisco friends will be there than if the wedding had oc- 
curred during the weik. 

MISS PENELOPE ALLEN BODEN. daughter of Mrs. G. C. Mae- 
donald, and Mr. William Stone Davis of Berkeley made the 
formal announcement Saturday afternoon of their engage- 
ment at a large bridge tea at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Mac- 
donald in Broderick street. The guests included a group of 
girls belonging to the Alpha Xi Delta sorority, of which Miss 
Boden is a member. Mr. Davis is the son of Mrs. F. S. Davis 
of Berkeley. He is a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
fraternity and a graduate of the University of California. Miss 
Boden is also a graduate of the University of California. No 
plans have been made for the marriage of Miss Boden and 
Mr. Davis, but many social affairs are being arranged in 
their honor among their college friends. 

MISS JEANETTE NORRIS. whose engagement was announced to 
Gerald Herrman recently, is at the St. Francis, where she is a 
guest of Mrs. Edgar Preston. Her marriage will be an event 
of April. Miss Norris will be here for several weeks before 
returning to her home in iMedford, Ore., and will greet her 
uncle. Charles Norris, and Mrs. Norris on their return from 
Europe. 

MR. AND MRS. WILL' AM PIERSON HAMILTON, who were mar- 
ried in Santa Barbara January 2nd, had a very quiet wed- 
ding. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Arthur Grant 
Evans at the home of the bride, who was Mrs. Theodosia 
S. Carlin. a former New Yorker, who has lived in Santa Bar- 
bara for the past few years; Mrs. Hamilton was attended by 
her little daughter, Joy Carlin, and Reginald W. Rives, a 
life-long friend of Hamilton, acted as his best man. The only 
other persons present were Mrs. Hamilton's sister and broth- 
er-in-law. Mr. and Mrs. W. A. W. Brownell, and Major and 
Mrs. Max C. Fleischmann. intimate friends. 

MISS MARY LOUISE MICHAELS and Mr. Blake Darling an- 
nounced their engagement last Friday at a tea given by the 
bride-e'ect and her mother at their home in Buchanan street. 
Miss Michaels is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Michaels. 
Mr. Darling is the son of Mrs. Herbert Darling of Brooklin. 
For the past year Mr. Darling has made his home in San 
Francisco with Dr. Adelaide Brown, and has gone into busi- 
ness here. The marriage of the young couple will take place 
in the spring. 

MRS. JESSE WILBUR GLOVER and her daughter. Miss Adalene 
Ward Eaton, gave a tea Tuesday at which announcement was 
made of the betrothal of Miss Eaton to William Kenneth 
Lowe, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Lowe of Woodland. 
The wedding is planned for next fall. Meantime Mrs. Glover 
and her daughter plan to tour abroad. 

LUNCHEONS 

MISS MARY EMMA FLOOD gave a luncheon Thursday at her 
home in Broadway for Miss Julia Adams, a debutante of this 
season. 

MISS AGNES WESTON, whose marriage to Mr. John Handlin 
Threlkeld will be an event of April, was the principal guest 
at a luncheon and bridge party given on Saturday by Mrs. 
A. C. McLaughlin. It took place at the San Francisco Golf 
and Country Club and the hostess was assisted by her daugh- 
ters. Miss Frances Anne and Miss Evelyn McLaughlin. Others 
there were Miss Barbara Sesnon, Miss Alelaide Griffith, Miss 
Edith von Rliein, Mrs. Thornton High, Miss Vera Bernhardt, 
Miss Elizabeth Terry and Miss [Catherine Stonev. 



MRS. EDWARD SIMPSON, the wife of Admiral Simpson, U. S. 
N., will be the guest of honor at a luncheon which Mrs. 
George Landenberger, wife of Captain Landenberger, U. S. 
N., will give this Saturday at the Naval Station on Goat Is- 
land. 

MRS. HORACE W. MORGON entertained at a luncheon Wednes- 
day at her home in Washington street for her sister-in-law, 
Mrs. Norris King Davis, who is spending the midwinter 
months in San Francisco. Since her arrival in San Francisco, 
Mrs. Davis has been extensively entertained by her many 
friends here. At the end of the season she and her daughter, 
Miss Margery Davis, one of the season's debutantes, will re- 
turn to their home in Montecito. 

MRS. LOUIS F. MONTEAGLE has issued cards for a luncheon 
party to be given at her home on January 16. 

THE MISSES MARIE AND FLORENCE WELCH, two of the pop- 
ular debutantes whose season has been filled with compli- 
mentary affairs, were the honor guests Tuesday at a hand- 
some luncheon party given by Miss Barbara Ballou, which 
took place at the home of Judge and Mrs. Sidnev Ballou. 

MRS. FERDINAND THIERIOT, who has just returned from 
Paris, where she has been living for the past few years, was 
being welcomed by her many friends at luncheon at the St. 
Francis Monday. She was in a group including her sisters, 
Mrs. George Cameron, Mrs. Joseph Tobin and Mrs. Robert 
Hays Smith and Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran. 

MRS. J. A. FORD gave a large luncheon Monday at the St. 
Francis and had as her guests Mrs. Wm. G. Henshaw, Mrs. 
Harry Hill, Miss Celia O'Connor, Mrs. Violet Dunn, Miss Tiny 
O'Connor, and Mrs. R. P. Schwerin. 

TEAS 

MRS. JESSE WILBUR GLOVER and her daughter, Miss Adalene 
Eaton, gave a tea Wednesday at their home in Berkeley at 
which Miss Agnes Weston and Miss Elizabeth Ten Eyck were 
guests of honor. Miss Ten Eyck recently announced her en- 
gagement to William Waste. 

MISS LILLIAN WHITNEY has come from New York for a visit 
and is with Mr. and Mrs. Effingham Sutton. She is being en- 
tertained by her friends, among them Mrs. Warren Perry, 
who gave an informal tea on Friday. 

MRS. HARRY SHERMAN has issued invitations for a reception 
to be given on January IS. at the Sherman residence at 2465 
Jackson street. The afternoon is in honor of the Misses Lucia 
Kitty Sherman and Isabel Sherman, who with their mother 
returned at Christmas time from abroad, where they had been 
for many months. The reception will be the formal coming- 
out for the Misses Sherman. Miss Lucia graduated from Vas- 
sal - and Miss Isabel finished at a school here. 

CATHOLIC DAUGHTERS of America and the Order of Alham- 
bra will open San Francisco's Catholic society season of 1924 
next Tuesday evening, January 15, with a monster whist 
party and dansant at the St. Francis Hotel. Tables will be 
set in the Colonial ballroom for one thousand whist players. 
A special set of tables will be arranged for man jongg fan- 
ciers, there being a great number of former whist fans who 
prefer the popular Chinese pastime nowadays. During the 
evening dancing will take place in the Italian ballroom. 

BRIDGE 

MISS AGNES WESTON was the principal guest at a bridge party 
which Miss Mildred Morgan gave Friday at the Stanford 
Court Apartments. 

DINNERS 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES TEMPLETON CROCKER will enter- 
tain at a dinner this Saturday evening at "Uplands," their San 
Mateo home, and later with their guests will attend the sub- 
scription dance at the Burlingame Country Club. Mr. and 
Mrs. Mountford Wilson and Mr. and Mrs. John Drum will 
also be dinner hosts before the ball. 

MR. AND MRS. CYRIL TOBIN and Mr. and Mrs. Richard Mc- 
Creei'V will also be dinner hosts before the dance. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Itusli Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Sun Francis 
Telephone Sutter :!".r," 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



HOTEL 

'St FRANCIS 

Dancing During Tea 

Mondays Four to Six 

Rooms for Mali Jongg and Bridge Parties on Reservation 

Without Charge 

Management Thos. J. Coleman 



)anuary 1.'. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



MR. AXD MRS. ROBERT HAYS SMITH will entertain at din- 
ner in Burlingame tins Saturday evening, and with their 
guests will later attend the subscription dance which will be 
held that evening at the Hurl ngame Country Club. 

BALLS 

THE MAIN SOCIAL EVENT of the week will be the subscrip- 
tion dance at the Burlingame Club this Saturday night. Mr. 
and Mis. Mountford Wilson. Mr. and Mrs. Frederick McNear 
and Mr. and Mrs. Templeton Crocker will be dinner hosts 
preceding the affair. 

MISS JULIA ADAMS, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edson Adams, 
had set the date for her debut hall for January 19, but has 
postponed it until a later date, so as not to conflict with 
the Wampas hall, which will be given on that evening. 

MR. AND MRS. RUDOLPH SPRECKELS will give a ball at the 
Burlingame Country CKih on the evening of January 26, to 
introduce their daughter. Miss Claudine Sprecke'.s, to society. 

THE QUART'Z ARTS BALL, which will be held on January IS 
at the Fairmont Hotel, will be an artists' revel such as not 
often seen outside of Paris. A group of San Francisco artists 
are planning the hall, the second they will have given in the 
city. The affair is to become annual and will take the place 
of the gay masked balls given at the Hopkins' Art Institute 
before the fire at the big Mark Hopkins' residence at the 
corner of California and Mason. The idea of duplicating the 
famous Quart'z Arts ball of Paris, in San Francisco, origi- 
nated in the mind of Girard Hale, the portrait painter. He 
lived fifteen years in Paris in the Latin quarter, studying, 
and one night at his studio on Sutter street suggested to a 
few of his artist friends that they hold a party in his studio 
similar to the Latin quarter balls. So many people wanted 
to go to it that the affair was expanded into the ball given 
last January at the Fairmont, which will go down into the 
artistic and social history of the city as being one of the 
successes of the day. Mr. Hale is assisted by Mr. Dan Dustin 
of New v'ork, who has also lived in Paris and attended the 
artists' balls there. Miss Genevieve Hailey, formerly a Port- 
land girl, who has established herself here as an artist of 
ability, and Mr. Benjamin Johnson, the writer, whose stories 
are published in Eastern Magazines. The invitations to the 
ball on January IS give the keynote to the color scheme. 
They are in black and gold and were designed by Ray Coyle. 
The entire main floor of the Fairmont will be the setting for 
the ball and dancing will be in the ball-room, which will be 
transformed into a black and gold scheme, splashy and re- 
splendant. The dining-room of the Fairmont will be turned 
into a French cabaret with tables for diners lining the wail 
and an open space in the center for distractions. There will 
be more entertainment later in the evening on the stage at 
the extreme end of the ball-room. Bizarre pantomine will he 
presented by professionals and there will he dancing of the 
latest type. The Sausalito Players will appear in one of their 
effective bits and there will he sparks from the Intelligentsia 
of Berkeley. 

IX TOWN .AM) OUT 

MR. AND MRS. HENRY FOSTER DUTTON and her sister and 
niece. Mrs. Harry Macfarlane and little Miss Jean Macfarlane 
of Honolulu, left the early part of this week tor a fortnight's 
slay at Coronado. Mrs. Macfarlane and her daughter will 
sail for their home in the Hawaiian Islands the early part 
of February. 

MR. AND MRS. 10. H. LESTOCK GREGORY will leave her,- Feb- 
ruary 1 for the East and Europe. After a short visit in New 
York, they will sail on the steamer Berengaria mi February 
It! for Europe, and remain abroad until the first week in 
June. During their travels they will visit the Mediterranean 
countries, and also travel in Italy. France and the British 
Isles. 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED HURTGEN have arrived from Germany 
and are with her mother. Mrs. Horatio Livermore, at her 
home on Russian Hill. With their children they came tn 
San Francisco hy way of the Panama Canal. Mrs. Hurtgen 
will he remembered as Miss .Manic Livermore, a popular girl 
in society here. She is paying her first visit to her former 
home in a number of yens The llurtgens will make their 
home in San Francisco. 

Mli AND MRS. WALTER WILLET and Miss Barbara and Miss 
Audrey Willet. who have been traveling abroad for tl 
two years, returned to San Francisco Tuesday. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Vnn Nesn At*., at Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is tiie most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



Kl.MF.K M. MOODBl KY Manager 



Mil \NI) MRS. JAMES L. SCHLESSINGBR have returned from 
a trip to Del Monte. They were the witnesses and only at- 
tendants at Hie marriage of Miss Ruth Whitley and R. L. 
Schlessinger, which took place at Salinas Friday. 

MISS LUCY HANCHETT and her mother, Mrs. Lewis Hanchett, 
arrived from Montecito on Sunday and are at the Clift Hotel. 
They will be in town for a month making preparations for 
Miss Hanchett's wedding. 

THOMAS FORTUNE RYAN, an eastern man of much prominence, 
arrived in this city Tuesday in his private car. After a few 
days' stay in this city he will go to the southern part of the 
state and from there he and his party will proceed to Palm 
Beach. Mrs. Ryan was too ill to make the trip this winter. 

TALLANT TUBBS has returned from Santa Barbara, where he 
has been the guest of his motber, Mrs. Benjamin Brodie. 
over the holidays. 

MR. AND MRS. FRANKLIN K. LANE JR.. who passed the holi- 
days in this city, have returned to their home in Los Angeles. 

MISS YSABEL CHASE, who has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Hunt in Pasadena, is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. George Gor- 
dan Moore at their home in San Mateo. She will go East 
in about a fortnight to visit her uncle, Horace B. Chase Jr., 
at Palm Beach. 

MRS. MAILLER SEARLES and her daughter, Miss Jean Clift 
Searles, who have been in Santa Barbara since before Christ- 
mas, will return to their home in Piedmont this week. Short- 
ly before leaving for the south, the engagement of Miss 
Searles and Mr. Jean De'.attre-Seguy of Paris was announced, 
and on their return to their home arrangements for the wed- 
ding will be made. 



DEL MONTE 

THE PACIFIC COAST POLO SCHEDULE for 1924 opens at 
San Mateo January 11th and 13th with games between Del 
Monte, winner of the coast championship tournament last 
year, and San Mateo. The schedule which was announced re- 
cently hy John B. Miller of Los Angeles, chairman of the Pa- 
cific Coast sub-committee of the Polo Association, calls for 
twelve week-end matches at Del Monte and twelve at San 
Mateo. The season's schedule of polo matches promises to 
be the most interesting series ever held in California. Ex- 
ceptionally strong and well mounted teams will carry the 
colors of Del Monte, Cardinals and Midwick. An entirely 
re-organized team with the exception of Captain Hugh Drury 
will this year represent Del Monte in an effort to retain the 
championship trophy won hy that team last year. 



MORE TREKS FOR GOAT ISLAM) 

Fifteen hundred small trees supplied hy the California Spring 
Blossom and Wild Flower Association, Mrs. Elmer M. Woodbury, 
president, will be planted this week on Goat Island. This com- 
pletes the number of trees a led and the island will now be 

completely covered. An earlier planting of two thousand trees 
by the association took place several months ago when fifteen 
hundred children enjoyed a day on the island, planting and 
picnicing. The present work is under the direction of Captain 
George B. Landenhurger. Mr. (lus Sequra and Captain H. W. 
Rhoades of the Light House Department, and the trees will he 
planted on the barren spot west of the light house on the east 
side of the island. Twenty good sized Redwoods donated by 
Harry Greene of Monterey, brother of Clay Greene the playright, 
were planted recently. The 0. s Department of Agriculture 
through 0. P. Rixford have donated Pistachio nut trees, famous 
tor their autumn foliage These will also be planted this week 
west of the lighthouse. 



ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY OF Till-: PACIFIC 

Under the auspices of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 
the third of the annual series of astronomical lectures for the 
season ot 1923-1924, is to tie given at Native Sons' Hall, toll 
Mason Street, on Friday. January 18th, 1924, at 8:00 IV M. 
Dr. R. T. Crawford, professor of astronomy in the University of 
California, will deliver the lecture. The subject. "The Story 
of the Telescope, offers a fit Id of great interest for it deals with 
the development and evolution of the great observatories of 
and the giant engines of vision which peer into space to 
distances unknown to those of former generations. The lecture 
to the public. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservation* at City Booking Office 

401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Sutter (II* Under Management CARL 8 3TANLKT 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 12, 1924 






FINANCIAL^ 



By P. N. BERINGER 

APART from the fact that much of the talk now going 
on as to city merging, is among those who would bene- 
fit the most through such amalgamation and is not at all 
a general subject, there is much to be said in favor of such 
a coming together of San Francisco and Oakland, it would 
benefit the two communities and it would make much easier 
the governing of both. It should lessen the cost of govern- 
ment, too. \t the present time the propaganda was started 
in San Francisco and it has been kept up by a very ener- 
getic body of men and women, who are non-residents of San 
Francisco, but who sleep in Alameda and in Oakland. The 
work in favor of the merger has been very well dime, but 
if the shadow of having Oakland and other cities help pay 
for the cost of Hetch Hetchy did not overcast the whole 
affair the annexationists would have a much easier going 
of it. As it is. annexation or amalgamation is not possible 
just at this time. * * * 

The Hetch Hetchy 

It begins to look as if there was to be some sort of a 
show-down in Hetch Hetchy affairs, and a general cleaning 
up and investigation of what has been done in this great 
work, should be had, before we go on spending any more 
money in the way in which it has been spent. It is not 
believed there has been any graft going on. but it is be- 
lieved that many things have been done for which the mayor 
and the supervisors have had no warrant in law. Nobody 
denies the work done by Mr. O'Shaughnessy and his aids 
has been a wonderful achievement, and all are ready to 
honor the great engineer, but there are many who have a 
desire to know just where the city stands fundamentally 
as to an ultimate use of .sufficient water before money is 
spent on creating a power producing plant. Are we really 
to have water in sufficient quantities and at all times? There 
are capable engineers and lawyers who deny this as a fact. 

White Field Labor 

In the Sacramento Valley there seems to exist a very 
determined desire on the part of fruit growers and grain 
men to supplant Japanese labor by Americans or foreign- 
ers, brought from other parts of the United States and the 
Chamber of Commerce has, it is reported, called a meeting 
to consider possibilities along that line. The Industrial and 
Home Products bureau of the Chamber has this matter in 
hand and I). I.. Smith, C. C. Finnegan. and L. B. Schel are 
a committee appointed for the purpose of making a survey 
and ascertaining just how much Japanese labor is really 
employed b\ the Sacramento Valley farmers. 

The National Chamber of Commerce 

< »n January 29th the United States Chamber of Com- 
merce will meet in this city as previously announced in this 
column. This is one of the most important meetings to take 
place here this year. The convention will bring together 
about one thousand delegates from eleven Western states. 
Paul Shoup. .Marshal K. Dill, and C. M. Levy are some of 
those who are in the forefront in the affair and to whom, 
whatever success is attained in this meet, thanks will be 
due. 

* * * 

A Big Factory 

The Westinghouse people are to erect a factory at Em- 
eryville that is to cost a half million dollars. This will add 



many expert workers to those already living in the bay 
region and it will, to a very large extent, divorce us from 
dependence on the Schenectady factory in matters of elec- 
trical material of all kinds. Manager Heise and his co- 
workers are to be thanked for their untiring efforts to bring 
the Westinghouse factory to us and the judgment of Mr. 
Heise and his associates is sure to be accepted and made 
good by the general public. 

* * * 
'Round the World 

From San Francisco started this week the 'round the 
world trip of the Dollar Steamship Company. This com- 
pany is one of the most enterprising of all the great busi- 
ness enterprises of the city by the Golden Gate. This trip 
will go very far toward advertising San Francisco and Cali- 
fornia to the world at large and to many of those who have 
undertaken the journey under such splendid management, 
the trip will be akin to a college education. 

Tips to Taxpayers 

Every person (single) whose net income for 1923 was 
$1000 or more, or whose gross income was $5000 or more, 
and every married couple, living together, whose net in- 



THE 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 

RESOURCES 

Loans and discounts $15,826,880.41 

Bonds and securities 1,834,090.31 

Bank building and fixtures 3,697,365.39 

Customers' liability under acceptances 

and exchange future contracts 345,738.04 

Other assets 209.164.71 

Five per cent redemption fund 50,000.00 

U. S. Bonds and Certificates 2,579,123.21 

CASH AND SIGHT EXCHANGE 7,770,702.04 

Total $32,313,064.11 

LIABILITIES 

Capital, Surplus and Profits 4.5S5.427.60 

Letters of credit and acceptance 349,611.04 

Rediscounts and bills payable with Fed- 
eral Reserve Bank 1,675,000.00 

National bank notes outstanding 983,800.00 

Bonds on First National Bank Bldg 880,000.00 

Other liubilities 124,066.19 

DEPOSITS 33,715,159.28 

Total $32,313,064.11 

Liabilities under letters <»f credit issued but not as yet 
drawn against $936,160.56 

JOHN A. HOOPER -...President 

.1. K. Ml IFFITT Vice-President 

E. AVENALI Vice-President and Cashier 

Vice-Presidents 

<•. h Mccormick geo. a. Kennedy 

W. W. JONES 

Assistant Cashiers 

L. P. CADOGAN It. A. NEWELL FRANK SEED 

V. M. ALVOR1 1 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

GEORGE D. COOPER CLIFTON H. KROLL 

ROBERT T. DEVLIN WALTER S. MARTIN 

ROBERT E. EASTON .1. K. MOFFITT 

ARTHUR GOODALL F. C. MORGAN 

I-;. C. HOLMES J. H. NEWBAUER 

JOHN' A. HOOPER WARREN OLNEY, JR. 

It. W. KINNEY W. T. SMITH 

CLINTON IS. WORDEN 

CALIFORNIA'S OLDEST NATIONAL BANK 

Affiliated With a Savings Bank. 
FIRST FEDERAL Tltl ST COMPANY 



January 12. 1024 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



come was $2000 or more, or whose gross income was $5000 
or mi. re. must file an income tax return. 

Gross income is ;ill income received from salary or wages, 
business, trade, profession, or vocation, dealing in property, 
rents, or dividends, or from the transaction of any business, 
carried on for profit. Net income is gross income, less cer- 
tain specific exceptions, deductions for business expenses, 
bad debts, taxes, etc. 

* * * 

Exemptions 

The exemptions are. for single persons, $1000; $2500 for 
married persons, living together, whose income for 1923 
was $5000 or less, and $2000 for married couples whose 
income was in excess of $5000. An additional credit is al- 
lowed of $400 for each person, other than husband or wife, 
dependent on the taxpayer for chief support because phy- 
sically or mentally defective. 

* * * 

European Conditions 

Conditions in Europe are improving and the German gov- 
ernment is approaching the point cp.iite rapidly where it will 
be impossible to continue the policy of an attempt at na- 
tional bankruptcy. In England, the unemployed problem, 
which is the greatest danger England has to face and mas- 
ter, is receiving, at last, the attention it deserves and it is 
now plainly demonstrated that, relieving Germany of the 
payment of reparations and opening its borders to the out- 
flow of its goods, can have nothing but a disastrous efifect. 
The politicians have had to quit using Germany as a buga- 
boo at home. In France there is some popular trepidation, 
because of the downward tendency in the purchasing power 
of the franc, for it is recognized the condition of the franc- 
is only a temporary one and that, very soon, it will be ris- 
ing in value again. Generally speaking-, all goes as well as 
can be expected and France has strengthened herself by 
new agreements with the nations comprising the Little 
Entente. 

* * * 

The Crocker National 

The published statement of the Crocker National Hank, 
of San Francisco, shows the growth and the prosperity of 
the business for 1923, and the standing of the bank at this 
time. The resources amount to $50,259,819.17, the capital 
of the bank is $2,000,000. the surplus and undivided profits 
amount to $7,278,605.67 and the circulation is $2,000,000, 
while the deposits amount to $36,551,183.04. 




romantic 
America, 

East 



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9 all year o 

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at reduced round trip 
rates to midcontinent 

and Atlantic Coast points 

Stopovers anywhere 
Fred Harvey meals 

■ far details and reservations 

R. D. Johnson, Dlv. Pass. Agt., 601 Market Street, or 
Ferry Depot, Plume Suiter 7600 

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The bank operates one of the most systematic foreign 
departments, where the purchase and sale of foreign ex- 
change may be transacted, collections may be made, drafts 
and cable transfers may be made, for financing imports 
and exports of merchandise. The bank issues circular and 
commercial letters of credit available in all parts of the 
world. The safe deposit vaults are open every business day 
of the year, between the hours of 8 A. M. and 6 I'. M. 



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16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 1-'. 1924 



Ple/isure'sWw 




OBEY NO WAND BUI PLEASURE'S 

73/77 Moore- 



Kathleen Norris Story at Granada 

"Lucretia Lombard" was penned by 
Kathleen Norris in novel form. In Los 
Angeles the same film is billed as 
"Flaming- Passion" and it is a story 
that is well adapted for the screen. 
Irene Rich, who plays the leading role, 
is a beautiful and charming actress 
who wins the admiration and sym- 
pathy of the audience for Lucretia 
from the very beginning. Norma 
Shearer has an important part as Mimi 
and has undoubtedly won new laurels 
for herself in this picture. Aside from 
the human interest the story possesses, 
there are some thrilling scenes of fire 
and flood. The blowing up of a pow- 
der house and bursting of a dam with a 
consequential flood is wonderful pho- 
tography and acting, but it approaches 
the ludicrous when the two girls flee 
through the burning forest in widely 
flowing draperies without getting 
scorched. 

Next week's program at the Granada 
promises much of interest. Julian 
Street's novel. "Rita Coventry," has 
been adapted to the screen and titled 
"Don't Call It Love." It is a Paramont 
film, directed by William De Mille and 
starring Agnes Ayres. Jack Holt. Nita 
Xaldi. Theodore Kosloff and Rod La 
Roq. In addition, and in honor of the 
Wampas and their ball here, over 
thirty people will appear in a prologue 
"Twenty Minutes in a Movie Studio," 
featuring George Dewey Washington. 
Round 12 of Fighting Blood will round 
out this promising bill. 



"Black Oxen" Attraction at Warfield 

Frank Lloyd's production of Ger- 
trude Atherton's novel "Black Oxen" 
promises to fill the theater for a run 
of weeks. This is equally due to the 
notice the book has had before it was 
adapted to the screen and to the fact 
that the public is admittedly interested 
in the scientific fact of youth restora- 
tion. The story as written by Mrs. 
Atherton is retained and the main char- 
acters well portrayed by the beautiful 
Corinne Griffith and Conway Tearle. 
Clara Bow as the jazz-mad flapper 
Janet is a dash of paprika that is most 
acceptable. As pictured, the contrast 
between the woman of sixty and the 
same rejuvenated is too great; she is 
too young and beautiful for the wild- 
est stretch of the imagination to be- 
lieve possible. However the story is 
one that seems to hold the interest of 



the public. An added attraction is the 
ensemble of gifted harpists with Marie 
Macquarrie. The next attraction will 
lie "Twenty-one" starring Richard 
Barthelmess and Dorothy Mackaill, 
former Follies favorite in Xew York. 



Favorite of Kipling's at California 

There are few or us indeed who can 
not dig out of our memory the grip- 
ping story of the "Light That Failed." 
And then we at once recall that the 
tale was published with two different 
endings, one tragic and one happy. 
The former was the better story but 
the happy ending is the one that has 
been adapted to the screen. George 
Melford directed the picture and ai 
clever cast have made it a better than 
a\ erage film. Percy Marmont. who 
made his debut in "If Winter Comes." 
plays Dick Heder, wdio is stricken with 
blindness on the day he completes his 
masterpiece. Sigrid Holmquist plays 
Maisie and Jacqueline Logan scores as 
Bessie the London street waif. In ad- 
dition to the screen attraction Paul 
* sll features the Overture From Wil- 
liam Tell and Ben Turpin stars in 
"Asleep at the Switch." 

The California theater plans a most 
unusual program for next week. Fea- 
turing the film, "The Unknown Pur- 
ple," the management has secured the 
stage presence of the stars Henry Wal- 
thall, Alice Lake, Stewart Holmes. 
Helen Ferguson and others. They will 
portray the same characters they do 
in the film, in some of the most dra- 
matic scenes of the play and it promises 
to be an interesting experiment. 



Orpheum Has Packed Houses 

Good vaudeville still prevails at the 
Orpheum, in spite of the holiday bill 
being a thing of the past. The offer- 
ings are varied, witli a bit of acro- 
batics, of <lanctng. of music, of com- 
edy, and, of what we get all too sel- 
dom these days, a good skit. In the 
history of vaudeville I do not believe 
there has ever appeared a better one 
man act than "Drafted" as done by 
Johnny Burke, if we measure his suc- 
cess by the uproar that greets every 
crack he makes. In the uniform of a 
doughboy, with serious face, and a 
thin reproachful voice, he tells his story 
of how he was drafted and how he 
served his country during the war. 
Every line he utters evokes a hearty 
laugh and if the material is his own 



it is well he has had it copyrighted. 

Benny Leonard, the lightweight 
champion of the world, is here with a 
pleasant mixture of sparring, comedy, 
and reducing exercises. However, 
those ladies who go to view him with 
an idea of getting aid in reducing 
methods will have to take a course in 
acrobatics before they can hope to im- 
itate him. Herman Timberg and his 
brother Sam, who put on a most amus- 
ing act of their own, are apparently 
getting some additional fun out of 
Leonard's act. Leonard tells some good 
stories, and has a pleasant personality 
but he would do well to omit the reci- 
tation he closes with, some sob stuff 
that nobody would miss. Eleanor 
I licks and Chester Clute in "Thank 
You, Doctor," offer a skit full of ac- 
tion and amusing situations, and both 
the principals have an opportunity to 
prove themselves capable in portray- 
ing characters. They are ably assist- 
ed by Edwin Jerome as the Doctor, 
and Rosanna Allison as the nurse. Sig- 
nor Friscoe frisks up and down the 
keys of a xylophone in classic and jazz 
selections. He performs the Tales of 
Hoffman in a quartet arrangement and 
without accompaniment of the orches- 
tra with great skill and expression. 
Marie Cavanagh does not need to 
travel on her sister's reputation in 
vaudeville. She is a refined and grace- 
ful dancer, with no particular fire or 
voice it is true, but delightful to the 
eye in a number of very attractive cos- 
tumes. Next week lovers of the drama 
and admirers of a great actress will 
have the opportunity of seeing Nazi- 
mova in a new sin rt play on the Or- 
pheum circuit. 




Wampas Week 

in San Francisco 
January 19i-<26 

Hotel Plaza warmly welcomes 
the Wampas crew and assures 
them of every comfort here dur- 
ing this week of gaiety. 

HOTEL- 

PLJVZA 

POST STREET AT STOCKTON 



January 12, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



S. F. Symphony 

This Tuesday evening". January 1?. 
will find the Exposition Auditorium 

crowded to the doors again at the third 
popular concert of the present series 
given by the San Francisco Symphony 
( Irchestra, Alfred Hertz conductor, un- 
der the direction of the Municipality. 
The time announced is 8:20. Another 
highly interesting- program has been 
prepared, with wonderful Tschaikow- 
ski "Pathetique" Symphony as the 
principal orchestral number. The same 
composer's Andante Cantabile for 
stings will also be played, along with 
Percy Grainger's quaint "Molly on the 
Shore" and Elgar's Pomp and Circum- 
stance March, at which Uda Waldrop 
will preside at the organ. The soloist 
of the evening will be Ethel Legin- 
ska. an English pianist who stands 
supreme as a master interpreter and 
composer of rare intelligence and un- 
bounded charm. The price of reserved 
seats remains at 25, 50 and 75 cents, 
and one dollar, and Supervisor J. Em- 
met Hayden, chairman of the Audi- 
torium Committee, in charge, an- 
nounces that the demand is larger than 
ever at Sherman, Clay and Company's. 



La Gaite Francaise 

The Gaite Francaise has scored a 
big success with "Le Gendre de M. 
1 'oirier." This play, by Emil Augier 




and Jules Sndeau, was a line vehicle 
to show the great ability of tlmsc tak- 
ing part in it. Mrs. ( . Ellsworth Wylie, 

a society matron, took the sole femi- 
nine role, which was enthusiastically 
received by the audience. William 
Mayo Newhall and 1'arroll McNear 
took the leading male parts. Consider- 
ing the fact that we have never seen 
Newhall in any attempt of this char- 
acter before the result exhibited by this 
gentleman was nothing short of won- 
derful. 



The White Tiger 

At the Cameo the White Tiger still 
holds the stage. The play is a good 
one and the music incidental to it is 
very good, indeed. 



A DUTY TO PERFORM 

It seems the public have a right to 
expect the Supervisors will act soon 
as to the acquisition of the Market 
Street System of street railways. The 
people long ago expressed themselves 
on this subject and still there has not 
been found the Supervisor who will 
have the hardihood to force the issue 
among his fellows. We shall now see 
what the new members may have to 
say on this subject. Nothing w hatever 
is to be gained by any farther delay. 

Delays in this instance simply mean 
an additional cost of operation which 
must be laid on the shoulders of the 
tax-payer. Two systems of street rail- 
ways is just as bad as two systems of 
any other public utility when one will 
render better and cheaper service than 
two. 

In both systems, as they stand, bet- 
terments and extensions are necessary 
but with the double system these be- 
come impossible and the people have 
a right to demand that some action 
be taken at once. It is no wonder there 
is a grow in- dissatisfaction with the 
supervisorial body when such long de- 
lays occur about a public demand so 
forcibly expressed. 



— "What happened to Babylon?" 
asked the Sunday-school teacher of the 
smart boy. "It fell." he replied. "And 

what became of Nineveh?" "It was de- 
stroyed." "And what of Tyre?" "It 
was punctured." 

— The woman had seen the play be- 
fore, and she was at great pains to 
explain the development of the plot to 
her neighbor. Finally the man behind 
leaned over and said. "Excuse me. 
madam, but the people on the stage 
arc making such a noise that 1 can't 
catch all you're sa; 



IMPULSE 

I do not know 

A single thing 
To make me laugh. 

To make me sing : 

For I have seen this 

All before — 
Lilacs, syringa 

At my door; 

My eyes have watched 
The wounding sight 

Of a mad petal's 
Fettered flight; 

Yet when wild April 

Flurries past, 
And honeyed buds 

Are opening fast — 
( Mi, when wild April 

Flurries by. 
My feet will dance.. . . 

I don't know why. 

— Power Dalton in Poetv. 



San Francisco 

Symphony Orchestra 

Alfred Hertz, Conductor 

Third Popular Concert 

(Third Series) 

Exposition Auditorium 

Tues. Eve., Jan. 15, 8:20 

ETHEL LEGINSKA 

The World-Famed Pianist 
GUEST AKTIST 

KeM'rved Setils, $1. 75c, 50o ami 25c 

l.\u war tax) 
Now "ii Sale at Sherman, Clay i^- Co.'s 

Direction Auditorium Committee Hoard of 
Supervisors, .1. Emmet Hayden, Cha Irman 



GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1.800,000 eups were nerved at the Fan- 

anta-raclnc International Exposition. 



"Daddy, did Solomon have seven 

hundred wives?" "Yes." I Pause for re- 
flection. Then: "Daddy, why did they 
call him the wisest man?" 



"Sign of 
the Cross" 



A delightfully attractive 
and unique page, shew- 
ing the way San Fran- 
cisco displayed the sign 
ol the cross, during the 
promotion of the Hard- 
ing memorial plan, is a 
feature ol next Sunday's 
Rotagravure section. 

"Yosemite in Its 
Winter White " 

a page "f winter scenes 

in the "i osemite is one 

(hat for sii 

beauty will he bard to 

equal; mere is a 

of evening gowns which 

will delight Milady: 

some more New Guinea 

pictures, and a score of 

other Interesting ple- 

- in The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 12. 1924 



IIIYIDKMI SOTICJK! 



THE SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 

(The San Francisco Bank) 
iiilfi California St. (and Branches), San Francisco 



For the quarter year ending December 31st, 
1923, a dividend has been declared at the rate ot 
lour anil one-quarter (4V 4 ) per cent per annum 
on all deposits, payable on and after January 
■>nd 1924 Dividends not called for are added to 
Lhe deposit account and earn interest from Janu- 
ary 1st 1924. Deposits made on or before Janu- 
ary LOth, 1924, will earn interest from January 
1st 1 9 2 4 

A. H. MULLER, Secretary. 



BANK OF ITALY 

Head Office and Branches 
Fur the half-year ending December 31. 1923. ;t 
dividend has been declared at the rate of four 
14) per cent per annum on all Savings Deposits, 
payable on and after January 2. 1924. Dividends 
not ealled for are added to ami bear the same 
rate of interest as the principal from January 1, 
L924. 

Deposits made to and including January 10, 
1924. Will earn interest from January 1. 1924. 
A. P. GIANN1NI, President. 

UNION TRUST COMPANY OF SAN 

FRANCISCO 

Market street at Grant avenue 

For the half-year ending December 31. 1923, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four (I) per cent per annum on all savings de- 
posits, payable on and after Wednesday. Janu- 
ary 2. 1924. Dividends not called for are added 
to and bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from January 1. 1924. 

Money deposited on or before January 1 0. 
1924, Will earn interest from January 1. 1924. 
F\ J. BRJCICWEDEL, Cashier. 

ITALIAN-AMERICAN BANK 

s. IS. corner Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

North Beach Branch, corner Columbus ave. and 

Broadway ; Columbus Branch, cor. Montgomery 

and Washington streets. 

For the half-year ending December 31, 1923, 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four and one-quarter (4%) per cent per annum 
on all savings deposits, payable on and after 
January 2. 1924. Dividends not called for will 
be added to the principal and bear the same rate 
of interest from January 1, 1924. 

1 vposits made on or before January 10, 
1924. will earn interest from January 1, 1924. 
A. E. SBARBORO. President. 

HUMBOLDT BANK 

783 Market Street, near Fourth 
Bush-Montgomery Branch. Mills Bldg. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1923, 
a '!i\ idend has been declared at the rate of 
foul i I) per cent per annum on savings di - 
posits, payable on and after January 2. 1924. 
Dividends not called for bear interest from Janu- 
ary 1, 1924. 

Money deposited on or before January 10, 
1024, will earn interest from January 1. 1924. 
H. C. KLEVESAHL. Cashier. 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN 
SOCIETY 

Corner Market. McAllister and Jones Sts. 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1923. 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
four i I ) per cent per annum on all deposits. 
payable on and after Wednesday, January 2. 
1924. Dividends not drawn will be added to de- 
positors' accounts, bee - ;i part thereof, and 

will earn dividends from January 1. 1924. 

Deposits made on or before January l". 1924. 
will earn interest from January 1. 1924, 

J. O. TOBIN, Acting Secretary. 



THE FRENCH-AMERICAN BANK 

(Savings Department) 108 Sutter Street and 
Branches 

For the half-j ear ending I lecember 81, L923, 
;i divtdend has been decla red at the rate of 
four and one-quarter (4%) per cent per annum 
on all deposits, payable on and after January 
2, 1924. Dividends not called for are added to 
and bear the same rate of interest as the prin- 
cipal from January 1, 1924. 

Deposits made on or before January 10, 1924. 
will earn interest from January I, 1924. 

LEON BOCQUERAZ, President. 



FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY 

I !orner Montgomery and Post Sts, 
For the half-year ending December 31, 1923. 
a dividend has been declared at the rate of 
Cour < I ) per cent per annum on all savings 
deposits, payable on and after January 2. 1-124. 
Dividends not called for are added to deposit 
account and earn dividend from January 1 
1924. 

Deposits made on or before Januarv in. 1924, 
will earn interest from Januarv 1, 192 I 

M. P.. ("DARK. Ciishier. 



SecoNp speeDS 



I Don't 

Some motorists are blooming fools, 
They trifle with traffic rules. 
I don't. 

No man should try to get the drop 
On any seasoned traffic cop, 
Nor fail to heed his sign to stop. 
I don't. 

A man should never drive too fast. 
Or brag about the cars he's passed. 
I don't. 

For Safety First should be his creed. 
Ihere really isn't any need 
To drive a car at reckless speed. 
I don't. 

A man should never lose his bean 
When piloting a gas machine. 
I don't. 

On city street or open road, 
A man should never break the code, 
Nor fellow-farers incommode, 
I don't. 

In fact, I have no car to run, 
I'm shy the coin to purchase one, 
Ycu'd think I wouldn't have much fun. 
I DON T. 



When you meet with a fog so dense that 
the glare of the headlights reflects back like 
a white blanket and the dimmed lights alone 
are not enough to show the grass edge ot 
the read, a slight improvement can be made 
by throwing the headlight bulbs slightly out 
of focus. 

Instead of concentrating the beams to at- 
tain a sharp penetrating light, adjust to ob- 
tain a shallow, flaring, spreading beam which 
will show up the side of the road and do 
away with much of the glare back from the 
impenetratable fog bank. 



"How do you do?" was a shoe dealer's 
greeting to a pair of bandits who walked 
into the store. They showed him how they 
do. — Detroit News. 



Landlady (looking in cup of coffee) : 
'Looks like rain today, doesn't it?" Boarder 
(looking at coffee) : "Yes, but it smells like 
coffee." — Burr. 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1849-51 Mission St., hot. 9th and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 
Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description ot metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 



Doctor — What! your dispepsia no better? 
Did you follow my advice and drink hot wat- 
er one hour before breakfast? 

Patient — I did my best, but I couldn't 
keep it up more than ten minutes. 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed fur 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect S419 

WHAT BUST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

Monte Rio 
Hotel 

Remodeled-Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rooms with Hot and Cold 

Water. 
50 Rooms with Private Bath. 
Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern GRILL on Main Floor. 

Now Open 
NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements. OFFICIAL 
A. A. A. HOTEL. Rates, American 
plan, $4 per day and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE H. CARR, Proprietor. 

Make Reservations in Advance 

See Peck Judah or Crabtrees 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 



40 Genry Street <u» T el. Franklin 36S5 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

M flu I Work Appertaining to Automobiles 
Ov.v-Aretylune Welding — Blacks ml thin* 



II. \V. Culver 



M. Daberer 



E. Johnson 



Carl Lconhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 11 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno. Cal. 



C. LALANNE 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL, 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

OLD POODLE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A $1.25 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m. 

to 9 p. m. 

Also A La Carte 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In Sun Francisco 

OS Post Street, Near Market Street 

I'hone Kearny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

91.26 

Meals Served a la Carte. Alto Regular 

French and Italian Dinner. 
FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days 91.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays.. SI .75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 

for the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street 



Golden Gate Restaurant 

2721 Hyde St. Phone Franklin 6500 

BAN FRANCISCO 

Afternoon Parties a Specialty 
Dance Italian Dinner 




CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO" 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEX EON 
' process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er it be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 
o r stationer t o 





n. w. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



YOU CAN 



LOOK YOUR BEST 



IF YOU HAVE A 



show you samples, ^j j^i.i L^:i j^ ir -ii Permanent Wave 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE ^=___. 



Established 1865 
41 First. Street - - San Francisco 



AT 




Are You 
Particular? 



Dining Car Service and Observation 
Cars With Speed and Comfort for your 
trip to Sacramento and the Sacramento 
Valley. 

For further information call 

San Francisco — Telephone Garfield 64 

Oakland — Telephone Piedmont 345 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R. 

Tin* Scenic Route 



I'hone <.,.rfl<>1il 3026 Piilmer Graduate 

Hours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Western States Life KiiiUiiii; 

DAB Market Street San ■frftnclnco 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. 18th and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



Ol'li service in all phases of Auto 
Livery is backed by an adequate 
organization and over forty 
years of successful experience in busi- 




lSl.ildi-li.il is<!.«* 
1633-1631 PINK STRF.F.T 



Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. C0SGR0VE 



He photographed this year on your 



Birthday 



^ 








Studios In nil Prlndpnl Cities of California 



Onklaml 
40K 14th St. 



San Franrlftro 
41 Grant Ave. 



Quality 1866 — 66 Years--1922 Quantity 

I »ur Service Includes Following; Places: 

Iturllncame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodalde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San FranrUro Phone Market 016 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 14S8 

Rcnnomj Darablllty 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Suit-. Vrr**ri\ I>t II anil, Only- 
Stilt* Tailed for and I>ellver*d 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

ParUlan Dyeinr and Clranlni* 
433 Matawn St Phone Franklin 2510 



KEATON NON-SKIDS PREVENT ACCIDENTS 





The skidding car in this picture is equipped with one of the numerous makes of SO-CALLED "non- 
skid" tires. Although nearly all tires are claimed to be "non-skid," skidding and sliding accidents are 
occurring daily. 

MAKE YOUR CAR SAFE! 

The Keaton is the one genuine Non-Skid Tire that will give you the much needed protection for your- 
self and loved ones. 

KEATON TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES PORTLAND SEATTLE 



,.u.. 
. R CLARK. 






Established July 20, 185) 

SAN FRANCISCO 




AND 



PRICE 10 CENTS 




California Advertiser 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 192 



EXPANSION 

and Opportunity 



You can join with the successful 
management of this great organi- 
zation on a profit-sharing basis. 

A limited number of shares of the 
full-paid, non-assessable stock of 
the American Toll-Bridge Company 
lias been allotted to California. 

The subsidiaries of this company 
that are operating under the Cali- 
fornia State Railroad Commission 
earned over $1,100,000 in 1023 with 
large profits available for dividends. 

Preference as to dividends mi the 
common stock, to California inves- 
tors, is provided for under the per- 
mit to sell in this state. 

American Toll-Bridge Company 

Underwood Building 525 Market Street 
Telephone Douglas 8745 
San Francisco. California 




-^ 



On Wednesday evening 
(Jan nary !>) in Sacramen- 
to, 850 representatives of 
the Important develop- 
ment organizations ami 
commercial intercut* «r 
Sacramento »ml thp Delta 
region unanimously en- 
dorsed the American Ton- 
Bridge Company and 
pledged full support, 11- 
nanelal H nil otherwise, to 
the early completion and 
successful operation of 
the Antloeh Toll-Bridge, 

Five Sources 
of Revenue 

Rodeo-Yallejo Perrj Co. 
Oolden Date Wmrrj Co. 
» nrqolnei Toll-Bridge 

intloeh Toll-Bridge 

Pittsburgh-Sacramento 

Auto Fern 




St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Snme tliink that a rigorous brushing once 
or twice a day is taking very good care 
of tliem. RruhhiriK is only a part of the 
process. Many tilings can happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. 
A toothache meant* trouble; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch your teetli and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? I»o your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk It over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crown*; 
Self Clennelng Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

Practice limited to 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours 10 to 5 — By Appointment — 

Saturday 10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4662 

Removed to Suite 5S7 Llebes Bldg. 

177 TOST STREET 

San Francisco 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th. 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1923 

Assets $89,174,468.57 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 430,275.37 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J^) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation 

General 
Liabilitj- 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . Manager 

1 05 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital $15,000,000 (15.000.000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

Wo will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

817-18 California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 



WEDDINGS A SPECIALTY 

Kelly's Limousine Service Will Please You 
The finest machines. Dependable, cour- 
teous chauffeurs. Xo disappointments. 
Reasonable prices. Special rate for shop- 
ping. Open and closed cars. 




Phone Franklin 2 17 



1629 Tine Slreet 



San Francisco 



Eittbllthtd July 10. 1656 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. CIV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 1^24 



No. 3 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott. Russ Building. 235 Montgomery Street. San Francisco, 
Calif. Telephone Douglas G853. Entered at San Francisco. Calif., Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

— "Anyone can be exclusive, but it takes a great soul to 
be inclusive." Muse upon these words, you snobbish ones! 

+ * + 

— The Ouatr'z Arts Ball on Friday night and the Wampas 
Frolic on Saturday. And some of us were equal to it ! 

* * * 

— "The temper of our times demands freedom from ar- 
bitrary rules and rulers — souls today are in revolt, because 

they are going forward." — Collier's Weekly. 

* * * 

— Funny, the sources that Dame Fashion resorts to, in 
founding styles. The color which Paris proclaims to the 
world as the popular shade for the season, is chosen from 
the garments of the winning jockey at the Spring races 
at Longchamps. 

— We are still hearing echoes of the hilarity at the va- 
rious New Year's revels. One community apartment house 
on Russian Hill staged an all-night affair, for which each 
couple was charged $100. There were 100 couples. Rather 
profitable returns for someone, for an evening's dance (?). 

* * * 

— We have a little philosophy of our own that generally 
works out satisfactorily. When ill luck follows fast upon 
our heels we remind ourselves that nothing lasts, not even 
bad fortune; and when good fortune is smiling at us just 
around the corner, we say: "Get all you can out of the 
present hour, for nothing lasts." 

* ¥ * 

— We wonder if the death of Dr. Allien AKrams, dis- 
coverer of the electronic method of detecting and treating 
diseases, will deter for a while, the attacks of the medical 
profession upon his system? Will the million dollars, which 
we have been told has been appropriated to light this sci- 
ence of healing, still be expended? 

* * * 

— "The supreme calamity of Germany lies in the fact 
that she has not been able, a- was France in 1871, to rind 
statesmen capable of facing the cruel truth iA the situation 
or to preserve a national unity, which would enable com- 
petent statesmen to impose the burdens and accept the 
humiliations and sacrifices that would alone make recovery 
possible." So s,:\s the American Review. 

* * * 

flu wife of an English General once told us that at 
the government ball- m India, a censor regulates the dec- 
oletee of the women attending. If her gown is not low 
enough to come up to the standard (that sounds contra- 
dictory, doesn't it) he sees that it is ripped down to the 
desired depth. He would have required a needle and thread 
at the Quart's Arts Ball! 



— Did you know that our exports of incandescent lamps 
during the last decade numbered more than 100.000,000? 
American electric lighting supplies go to 100 countries and 
colonies in every part of the world. 

* * * 

— We have met a most interesting woman lately, whom 
the war had driven from France to our hospitable shores. 
She is witty, well-bred, with a fund of information and ex- 
periences to draw upon, which makes her conversation most 
fascinatingly enlightening. We were thinking: "Well, these 
Europeans can put it all over us, after all !" when we dis- 
covered to our amazement that she is a native of Healds- 
burg, California. 

— It cannot be said that Harry Brolaski was a model 
citizen. In fact he is shown to have indulged in practices 
which he admitted, that are contrary to all the ethical 
tenets of the uplifters. But that does not interfere with the 
fact that he had a philosophy that saints might envy. "We 
should not take life too seriously," he said. "I have long ago 
learned to take the bitter with the sweet." There are many- 
long faced people with a preemption claim on heaven who 

may well envv him his serenity. 

* *" * 

— George Bernard Shaw says that Nationalism must 
now be added to the refuse pile of superstitions. Shaw, as 
usual, is sweeping in his deductions. Internationalism is 
all very well in the abstract, but difficult in the concrete, 
like many other idealistic movements. We may feel we are 
brothers to our progenitors. — the English speaking races. — 
we may even feel akin to all of the Latin peoples, but when 
it comes to embracing the Orientals, Africans, — all the "les- 
ser breeds," — we balk. 

* * * 

— The group of figures on the invitation to the Quatr'z 
Arts Ball has been criticized rather severely, in one in- 
stance having been called "an affront to decency, sugges- 
tive, vicious and demoralizing." These people who are 
always looking upon pictures as "suggestive" only suggest 
what evil thoughts are lurking back of their smug prudery. 
Leaving the subject of this particular group, what is the 

nude human form suggestive of? If it is well-proportioned, 
it should be suggestive only of health, happiness ami 

beauty. 

* * * 

— More and more does it seem to us that the age de- 
mands a woman's retaining her own name and identity 
after she marries. The woman of today hardly expects 
to accept one marriage as her destiny. Often she loses her 
first mate, through death or through — another woman. — 
and i- left stranded, in a much more difficult position, as 
a rule, than when she was single. She has hist, in a few 
years, her business, and often her social connections, and 
must start all over again, with a new name and reputation. 
How much easier for her. in many ways, if she had kept 
her maiden name! I inal name. also, has a psycho- 

logical meaning and significance that few appreciat. 
together, ladies, and exert yourselves on this important 
question. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



fanuary 19, 1924 




The status of a person under the in- 
Income Tax Facts come tax is determined by his status on 

the last day of the year on which the 
taxes are based. This gives some interesting results, ac- 
cording to the statements made by an expert. If a man 
marries on December 31, having been unmarried all of 
the preceding months, he may still claim all the exemp- 
tions of a married man. whereas on the other hand if a 
man's wife dies on the said date and he is a widower, he 
will only have the exemption of an unmarried person. In 
other words, there is no pro-rating as regards either per- 
sonal exemption or the credit for dependents. There is 
the same sort of interpretation in the case of dependents. 
The same paper points out that a person who has a de- 
pendent child not mentally or physically defective, that 
attains the age of eighteen just prior to the last day of the 
year, cannot claim any exemption for said dependent, 
though obviously a mental or physical dependent at eigh- 
teen is just as much dependent as it ever will be. There 
are several other matters in connection with children in 
which the act seems to pretend to function beyond its scope 
as an income tax measure. These relate as to the main- 
tenance of dependents when one is absent from the de- 
pendent. The act as interpreted, grants an exemption for 
children away at school but not for children absent by 
separation of parents. 



The doctors are very much worried 
"Mushroom" Medical these days. ( )nly last week we called 
Schools attention to their efforts to limit the 

use of the appellation "doctor" and 
to reserve the title for those who have the laying-on of 
medical hands properly performed, according to the rites 
of the protected Ksculapians. Xow they are worried about 
what they call "mushroom schools" and instance the Pa- 
cific Medical College of Los Angeles as a place of the 
"mushroom" sort. We do not pretend to know anything 
at all about that school, but the State Board of Medical 
Examiners, through its secretary, is making representa- 
tii ns to the governor that there is no way of getting the 
"mushroom schools" out of the way under the existing 
system of law. Therefore we must have more laws to en- 
able the medical hierarchy to maintain its present position 
of power and its almost tyrannical control over health. We 
hold no brief for quacks, but we point out that the science 
of medicine has not developed to the point that any par- 
ticular group can claim to be in possession of the keys of 
health. At present the charges of the doctors are reaching 
a height which makes a sickness a ruinous experience; and 
hospital rates are growing prohibitive. And yet doctors 
will blandly admit that they have SO far reached no so- 
lution of the most terrible human ills, like cancer. They 
are not lit for the power thev crave. 



We have already called attention to the 
The Japanese possibilities involved in the decision of the 
Decision Again supreme court, rendering leases of agri- 
cultural land by Japanese illegal. It is pos- 
sible, as we have shown, that there may be a temporary 
diminution in land values and an increase in the prices of 
certain fruits and other agricultural products. This is not 
at all certain, however, and gives no color of support to 
the sensational lies which are being spread throughout the 
F.ast. One article issued by a syndicate in the East said 
that fifty thousand Japanese are leaving the state and that 



there had been an enormous fall in the values of California 
fanning lands. Of course, this is quite untrue and is prop- 
aganda made to react unfavorably on the state. The facts 
are not in accordance with any such statement. Such prop- 
aganda provokes retaliation, which is not in the direction 
of good feeling. Thus the secretary of the Sacramento 
Chamber of Commerce says: "The type of Japanese that 
occupied the lands — a non-assimilable race with low stand- 
ards of the duty or responsibility of citizenship .... has 
set up a barrier against the kind of agricultural develop- 
ment which we desire." That is bad talk. It aggravates 
and insults the people over whom there has been a tri- 
umph; it arrogantly rubs in the fact that the Japanese 
are unwelcome and implies that they are inferior. That 
they are unwelcome is true, and that they should be here 
at all is at least doubtful, though it is not their fault that 
they are here. lint no one with any knowledge would call 
them inferior. 



In a recent statement Arthur Balfour made 
High Wages the prediction that the high wages which 

we are paying in the Cnited States will 
ultimately bring about a collapse in trade, which it will 
take four or five years of poor trade to get over, lie says 
that the country cannot hold up under the colossal burden 
of the present wage scale. It does not seem as if Mr. Bal- 
four were a very first rate economist, for the actual facts 
contradict him. Our foreign trade has increased as well as 
our domestic under this high wage system. On the other 
hand, reduction of wages in England has been followed by 
a diminution in trade, both foreign and domestic. As a 
matter of fact, three years ago. when we had an ominous 
depression in trade, which bid fair to set us back over a 
long period, the maintenance of a high wage scale, in all 
probability, saved the country the anguish of a long pe- 
riod of depression and recovery. On the other hand the 
system of doles for unemployment upon which the English 
have relied has, in our estimation, a deteriorating effect on 
the individual. It also leads to further extension of the 
same policy, as we see in the fact that one of the recom- 
mendations of the outgoing Baldwin ministry is that of 
linking up a system of old age pensions with the unem- 
ployment insurance. After all. we have had no better plan 
proposed than that which prevails among us of high wages 
for work done, and the stimulation of the invention of 
labor-saving devices. 



It is not always safe to take up the 
Those Petting Parties cudgels, in behalf or against any 
cause, just because some priest or 
minister has raised a hue and cry. In the case of the so- 
called petting parties, however, the cry and the hue had 
been going the rounds among men and women, who knew 
of wdiat was going on, for some time. 

A great many people, many of these being parents of 
girls and young men. who indulge themselves in the pelting 
fad. or fancy, or degeneracy, depending on the style of pet- 
ting that has been going on, would not believe that the 
petting parties actually exist or are going on. all of the 
time, in this city and in the surroundings. 

It is not known if this idea of promiscuous kissing and 
hugging was brought here. We do not know if it is an 
importation or whether it is a part of a general wave of 
immorality, sweeping the country. These things do come 
in waves and sometimes, for quite a long period of lime, 
all the barriers, between mora! and unmoral behavior, seem 
to break down. Of course, there is a reaction, and the un- 
moral tendencies have to be overcome, or society and civi- 
lization would disappear and mankind would relapse into 
the age of barbarism and utter degeneracy. 

The cure for the "petting parties" lies with the parents 
(jf the parties chiefly concerned in the petting. It is sheer 



lanuarv 1". l'»24 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



n msense u> blame the woman or the man for the petting. 
That is a thing to which the consent of both parties must 
be had and. as long as gir's are willing, nun will be found, 
who are also willing, and these miserable men will join 
the miserable women in the near-orgies and orgies, which 
si imetimes follow. 

Of course, it is false to suppose that girls are immediate- 
ly utterly spoiled by a stupid indulgence in petting parties. 
There is this to be said about it. however, and it may not 
be gainsayed successfully. Every time a petting party has 
been staged it leads to another and when the thrills com- 
ing from the ordinary osculation have been worn out, the 
participants look for other thrills. These come right along, 
as a matter of course, and we have girls crying out their 
hearts to their stupid and lax mothers and fathers, and we 
have recruits by the hundreds for the houses of prostitution, 
— we also have girls with babes, that shall have fathers 
unnamed, and women who will go to their graves unhon- 
ored, on account of having given way, with an unloved man. 
to the momentary thrill of physical connection. 

Those who have studied this terrible situation are 
RIGHT, the cure is in the home, it is to be found in the 
lazy, lax mothers and fathers who keep no track of the 
nightly doings of wayward sons and daughters. Society, 
in general, too, is to blame when the participants have 
reached an age where the father and the mother may not 
control the actions of participators in petting, who have 
passed their majorities. 

One minister is reported as advocating an interference, 
a "bawling out" of the petters, and asks that the auto spot- 
light be turned on such parties, that horns be tooted, and 
klaxons blown, whenever a petting party is sighted. This 
is extremely foolish advice to give because some of the 
petters may take the bull by the horn, as it were, and ad- 
minister to the interfering spotlighter and syren blower a 
terrific licking, which would in no wise end the petting 
parties. There are many other ways to bring this criminal 
wave at an end but the very best way to do is to waken 
the dormant instinct of morality not only in the parents 
but in the entire community. The petting parlies must stop 
and the public is going- to see to it they are slopped. In 
the meanwhile, let each parent look to the children and 
find out if the up-standing bright young man and the sweet 
rouged and powdered slip of a girl is not already on the to- 
bogan of indecency rushing downward to shame and degra- 
dation. 



In contrast to the unfortunate experiences 
Benefits of the of almost all the other large cities of the 
American Plan United States, San Francisco has gone 

through the entire year 1'lJ.i without a 
single strike of any consequence in the building trades. In 
fact, it may be said without any strike at all; for the only 
ones which occurred were of a small number of union plast- 
erers and pilednvers — the latter lasting less than two weeks. 
As for the union plasterers, they were working contented- 
ly under the American Plan until their international officers 
came and ordered them to strike on pain of losing their 
charter. Facing this situation, these men left their jobs. 
but after a few weeks of idleness they decided by unani- 
mous action to disregard their international officers, and 
returned to work under the American Plan. With these 
trifling exceptions, the 20,000 union and non-union men 
in the building trades of San Francisco worked side by 
side every working day throughout the entire year with- 
out trouble or controversy of any sort. Not a jurisdictional 
dispute occurred, and not a single job was held up. The 
wage scale set by the Impartial Ws 

tended public hearings, and enforced b) the Industrial As- 
sociation, guaranteed an excellent wage but prohibit 
tirely any pyramiding either up or down; and American 



Plan conditions prevailed throughout the entire building' 
industry. 

Furthermore, there was no strike in any of the other in- 
dustries of the community during 1923, except that of the 
garment workers which lasted but a short time and ended 
by the workers accepting the American Plan basis of em- 
ployment. San Francisco has thus had a full year of vir- 
tually unbroken industrial peace, which has been translated 
into concrete benefits for the whole city. 



A San Francisco friend in China sends a letter 
In China which sheds a more complete light on the Chi- 
nese situation, as it actually is, than anything 
which could be written editorially, so we quote for the bene- 
fit of our readers : 

"There has been one of the frequent wars between the 
Hunan Governor and one of the Southern generals. When 
I came up the river the idiots on both sides were firing on 
foreign steamers and so we were escorted through the dan- 
ger zone by a British gunboat. No shots were fired on 
us, but the next boat up got a lot of them in spite of the 
gunboat's return fire. After we got home the real fun 
began, for the troops of 'the enemy' began a slow bombard- 
ment of the town. One of the yamens is right near us and 
as that was one of the targets, every morning about five 
we heard the shells go screaming past, much too near for 
comfort. Bullets entered several foreign offices on the wat- 
er front, our consulate and the German and the Standard 
oil offices. Finally our gunboat got orders to return fire, 
in case American property was hit. and a notice to that 
effect was sent to the enemy. That stopped them for a 
while, and then the Governor's troops went over and drove 
them away with a grand crash-banging. Since then every- 
thing has been very quiet and people are beginning to go 
for picnics in the hills beyond the river. You cannot look 
on these wars seriously. The Chinese themselves do not 
care one way or the other. It's just one bloodsucking- gov- 
ernor or another. When they thought the Southern gen- 
eral was coming in. they put up a welcome arch; but the 
governor stuck it out and the welcome arch is still stand- 
ing down on the Bund, looking very bedraggled with its 
paper flowers all torn and faded by the rain. So we just 
look on the fighting as a great inconvenience to business 
and pleasure. It's so nice to be able to go about again 
without any trouble from stray bullets and half-witted 
sentries." 

\nd curiously barbaric as all this may appear; it really 
is not much different from the condition of things in Eu- 
rope only two or three hundred years ago. The fight be- 
tween the southern general and the governor could have 
been duplicated many times in the middle ages, and the 
people of the towns were just as indifferent then as to 
who became their overlord. They knew the ultimate was 
graft and oppression, at any rate, and by whom, was not by 
any means very important. Perhaps after all. it is not so 
different now. but the area of operations is increased and 
the modern system of dragging a whole population into 
the fray makes for a much greater amount of misery. But 
the really interesting and novel part of the show as de- 
scribed above is. that owing to modern improvements they 
are able to carry on these silly little feudal wars with 
modern weapons and precision. 



— In four years the Southern Pacific has not had a per- 
S( n killed in a steam-train accident. That is a wonderful 
record, and justifies the care which the company has al- 
ways given to safety. Such results cannot be obtained 
without the exercise of much skill. Yet we do not know 
the actual persons who are responsible for such results. 
That is a pity. Clever organization of that sort in the army 
would mean a nation-wide fame to somebody. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Our Boys of the Fifties 



January 19, 1924 



By A PIONEER 



AB( >UT the middle of the fifty decade there was estab- 
lished in San Francisco, the first private school of 
prominence and importance, and having a peculiar 
character. There were other schools, but not of the same 
size and standing. The one here specially mentioned was 
known as The San Francisco College. The school had a 
distinctive English tone and character, which was natural. 
seeing that the staff of Masters was essentially British. 
The Head Master was the Kevd.-John Chittenden, an Eng- 
lishman, and graduate of St. John's College, Cambridge 
University, with Alfred S. Lowndes, another Britisher of 
Oxford University, as second master; "William B. Harvey 
of Oriel College. Oxford, teacher of Latin and Greek, and 
Peter Dempsey of Trinity College, Dublin, as teacher of 
Classics and Mathematics. With these were Hypolite and 
Julius Duprey, two Frenchmen, teachers of the languages 
and belles letters. 

The school stood on the north side of Bush street and 
occupied two fifty vara lots. It was chiefly for day boys 
whose ages ranged from 9 to 16. For a matter of fact, un- 
like schools of the present day. socially the best place in 
the school was held by the day boys whose families were 
for the most part among; the best people of the citv and 
state, their fathers being men of wealth and high official 
and professional position, or bankers. Front street mer- 
chants, or possessers of large fortunes from real estate or 
the mines. The boarders, with few exceptions, were the 
sons of Mexican farmers, well to do, but of no social stand- 
ing in San Francisco. The boys numbered from seventy 
to one hundred, and it may be of interest to know who 
they were, and to follow, to a limited degree, the doings and 
careers of some of the boys after the school was discon- 
tinued in 1860. 

Judge J. D. Baldwin, of the State Supreme Court, con- 
temporary with Judges Field. Terry. Murray, Morrison. 
etc.. had three sons in the school. — Alexander (better 
known as Sandy). Holly and Joe. Sandy became a law- 
yer, and in his early twenties was a Judge upon the Bench 
at the same time that his father occupied a like position, 
Joe rather distinguished himself in a fight with the Indians 
up in Washoe. Clarence Burr was the son of the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Supervisors, the title of Mayor not 
being used in those days. Colin Campbell's father was fudge 
Alexander Campbell of the 12th District Court, a typical 
Scotchman. Colin became like many of the boys, an At- 
torney-at-law. The four Crittenden boys were all the sons 
of A. P. Crittenden, a foremost lawyer, who was for many 
years a partner of Samuel Wilson, and in 1870 was assas- 
sinated by Mrs. Laura D. Fair. James became a lawyer 
and practiced after the end of the Civil War. Churchill 
Crittenden was an officer in the Confederate Army, and 
was killed during the war in the south. The other boys 
were Parker and Howard. 

(lay ( ireene made a short lived name and tame as a play- 
wright in Xew York. Alexander Grogan became a very 
fashionable dandy, called "Dude" in those days. His father 
was an old South American Scotchman from Valparaiso, 
a friend and partner in business of Faxon I). Atherton. John 
Hunt studied law when he left "Chittendens." practiced 
for some time as partner of Judge Rising, and finally be- 
came a Superior Judge, and Judge of the Supreme Court 
also. 

Archibald C. Gunther became the famous author of "Mr. 
Barnes of Xew York," and much literature of that type and 
quality. Sam and Richmond Inge were the sons of Colonel 
Inge, a typical Southern fire eater, of those days just be- 
fore the "W'ah." and the two boys were quite the cocks 



of the school for fighting. The father of James and Joseph 
King was James King of Williams, editor of the San Fran- 
cisco Bulletin. Alexander Kostromitenoff was a full blood- 
ed Russian boy. son of the Russian Consul. 

The smartest boy in the school was Joseph Napthely, 
he often taking the place of a classical or mathematical 
master as the teacher of a class. He became a lawyer, sound 
but not brilliant. Lee Ransome, son of Leander Ransome, 
the land expert, became like so many of Chittenden's boys. 
a lawyer. James Ross on leaving school was known as 
Ross of Ross Landing, living up in Marin County. W. I. 
Kip. son of the Episcopal Bishop of California, was not 
exactly a day boy at Chittendens. but prepared for his ex- 
amination for entrance to Yale College by reading with the 
Classical masters. Sidney Smith Jr., son of the lawyer who 
was a leader in passing land titles, went into partnership 
with his father and lived over at San Rafael. At school 
"Sid" was known as a fighter; one of the great fights of the 
school (it not being forbidden by school rules to fight) was 
between him, Johnny Middleton and Holly Baldwin. But 
in manhood's years he quieted clown into a man of studious 
habits and mein. 

Henry A. Cobb had for his father General H. A. Cobb, 
the Militia General. He was very French in his tastes. 
Sherman Stowe was the son of William Stowe of Patter- 
son Wallace and Stowe. the leading law (inn. Stowe was 
a great politician and organizer of "Campaignes." Frank 
Washington's father was Collector of the Port under Pres- 




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Tanuary 1". 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



ident Buchanan. He and his brother, when old enough, en- 
tered the Confederate Army. John B. Weller, Jr.. was the 
son of the Governor of California. Both Henry and Hep- 
burn \\ ilkins were the suns of II. P. Wilkins the Attorney. 

Sam Throckmorton's lather was the man who owned 
the rancho at Lime Point and made himself famous by not 
letting- anyone shoot over it. At that time in California 
people might shoot anywhere they liked on anybody's land. 
John Middleton's father was the well known Auctioneer; 
and he became a prosperous man of business. William 
Mighel grew up to be a big and wealthy ship owner. The 
two neatest boys in the school were Fred and Frank Wal- 
ton, sons of a rich father who lived up on Taylor street, 
later known as "Nob Hill." The father of Mahlon and 
Alfred Yer Mehr was a German Clergyman. Alfred be- 
came a clerk in the Bank of Parrott and Co. Sam Brooks, 
Jr.. was a tall curley headed boy whose father was one of 
the leading- lawyers at the San Francisco Bar. Jerome B. 
Stanford's father was a member of the firm of Stanford 
Brothers, the California Street merchants, the brother be- 
ing no less a personage than Leland Stanford, Governor 
of the State, and the Central Pacific magnate. Sol Hyden- 
feldt was the son of Judge Hydenfeldt. Dal Bowie's father 
was Hamilton Bowie, one of Governor Walker's aides in 
the Nicarag-ua expedition. Parker and James Shatter were 
the sons of James McM. Shatter. 

Among other boys at the school were George Nagle, 
Fred and Noble Eaton, Max Popper, Henry Wangenheim, 
Ramon Pacheco, Rudolph Herold, etc., etc. 

The boy's dress of those days did not leave much room 
for anything ornamental. It consisted of a suit of two gar- 
ments — jacket and trousers; the jacket was single breasted, 
buttoning straight up to the throat usually with brass 
buttons, a white linen collar folding over at the neck with 
a narrow silk necktie, tied in a plain bow knot. This suit 
was usually of black, blue, or dark grey cloth. Commonly 
a dark blue cloth cap, with a glazed cover — in summer a 



straw hat, — was the head gear. 

There was one boy at Chittendens who dressed differ- 
ently. This was the famous novelist and playwright, Archie 
Gunther. Over his pantaloons he wore a short English blouse 
or tunic with a leather belt round his waist. There was 
nothing about him in those days to give one the impres- 
sion of a brilliant future in literature. 

The politics of the school were, among the boys, demo- 
cratic, James Buchanan being President. It was during- this 
time that the first "secession" of the south from the north 
took place in the leaving of the Breckenridge delegates from 
the Douglas convention, and followed by the nomination 
of Abraham Lincoln, an almost unknown man in Califor- 
nia, for the Republican party. As so much of the school 
was of Southern feeling-, the election of Mr. Lincoln may 
have had something to do with its loss of patronage and 
later the discontinuance of the school. 

The other schools of the city of different size and note 
were the University school on Union Square, kept by an- 
other Englishman, George Bates, of Cambridge University. 
This was a small affair. Gordon Blanding, son of William 
Blanding, the lawyer, went there and was prepared for 
Yale by Mr. Bates. Another school was known as "Dr. 
Burrow's." Among the boys there were "Billy" and Chal- 
mers Scott, sons of Dr. Scott, the Presbyterian Clergyman ; 
James and Charles Keeney. sons of the Army Surgeon of 
that clay. On Market street above Fourth was the Jesuit 
School of Father Maraschi ; Henry P. Bowie, A. J. and 
E. J. Le Bretton and Clarence Townsend were boys at this 
school. D. M. Delmas, A. J. Bowie, son of the leading 
physician, Fred Macondray, and Charles M. Tyler, were 
among those who went to the Jesuit College at Santa Clara. 

Of course there were the Public Schools of the city, and 
among the boys who went to them were: Eugene Dewey. 
Frank Soule, Jr., Lewis Haggin, Charles Low, Russell and 
Scott Wilson, J. V. Coffee, and Prentise Selby, whose fath- 
er was later one of the Mayors of the city. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 19, 192-1 



%mk HEtfRPIT'? 



■-Mr. Wiggles, who has a polite way of being rude to 
persons who deserve it. was paid a visit the other morning 
by an undesirable, who usually broke into Wiggles' pri- 
vacy regardless of all etiquette. This morning, however, 
owing to the mat being occupied by a large dog. he paused 
and knocked. 

"Walk right in." called Wiggles. "Don't mind the dog." 

"But will he bite?" was asked, cautiously. 

"That's '.hat I want to find out," was the reply. "I only 
bought him yesterday." 

# * * 

— The poor, long-suffering husband had just dropped into 
his first doze when lie was awakened by his wife shaking 
him. "John." she said in a hoarse whisper. "I can hear 
something moving downstairs, and I'm sure it's burglars. 
Get up at once and see what it is. And. oh dear, if you find 
any burglars, whatever will you do?" "Do?" echoed the 
husband calmly, as he began to slip on his dressing-gown; 
"I will do whatever they want me to do, of course. I have 
never had my own way once in this house yet. and it's too 
late to begin now." 

* * * 

— A middle-aged bachelor was in a restaurant at break- 
fast when he noticed this inscription on his eggs: 

"To Whom It May Concern: Should this meet the eye 
of some young man who desires to marry a farmer's 
daughter, eighteen years of atje. kindly communicate with 



After reading this he made haste to write to the girl, of- 
fering marriage, and in a few days received this note: 
"Your note too late. I have been married five months 
today." 

* * * 

— A Scot whose name was Macintosh, and who was 
proud of the fact that he was directly descended from the 
chief of the clan, was having a dispute over the fare he 
owed to a taxi driver. 

The man with the meter talked loud and harshly, and it 
angered the Highlander. 

"Do you know who I am?" he demanded, proudly draw- 
ing himself up to his full height. "I'm a Macintosh." 

The taxi driver snorted. 

"I don't care if you're an umbrella," he said. "I'll have 
my rights." 

* * * 

— Aunt Sally, the old negress who had been with the 
family ever since the now grown daughters had been 
"chill'un." eyed with mistrust the new fad for long dresses 
that had at last reached the village. 

"Do you think this dress is too long. Aunt Sally?" asked 
the youngest daughter, who always adopted the later 
modes. 

"Naw, mum. it hain't too long," answered Aunt Sally, 
"but it t'won't do no good — all de gentlemens round heah 
seed you before an' dey all knows de size and de shape." 

* * * 

— In a story being read in a country school, a character 
was described as being "a dumpling sort of a woman." In 
order to make sure the pupils understood the meaning, the 
teacher said: "Describe a 'dumpling sort of a woman.'" 

"Er — wouldn't she be rather tall ami thin?" asked a 
pupil. 

"Why, no. The lady was short and plump like a dump- 
ling." 

"Oh, yes! I was thinking: of a noodle!" 



Lest it be forgot it may be well 
Municipal Ownership for the readers of the San Fran- 
cisco News Letter to remember 
that this periodical has been, in season and out, always 
opposed to National, state, or municipal ownership of any 
public utility. Some people have supposed that, because 
the News Letter has advocated the immediate purchase 
of the Market Street System by the Municipal Railway of 
San Francisco, that there had been some change in policy. 
Such has not occurred, however, and the reason why the 
News Letter advocates this purchase is that no other course 
seems open to anybody having the interests of the city at 
heart. 

The conviction of the News Letter is that, as long as the 
Municipal Railway is in the field as an active competitor 
of the Market Street System, it is better that the Munici- 
pal Railway have the field all to itself and it is on that 
account the buying of the Market Street System has been 
so insistently urged. The Municipal Railway may not ex- 
pand as it should as long as the Market Street System is 
giving the wide-spread service it does and serves the pub- 
lic with such efficiency. 



THE RIVALS 

Pleasure is not the one I love: 

Her laughter in the market place- 
Makes every fool her echo there; 

And from her finger tips she throws 
Wild kisses in the open air. 

Give me that little miser. Joy, 

Who hoards at home her quiet charms; 
And offers with her two soft lips 

A warmer kiss than any thrown 
By Pleasure, from her finger tips. 

— W. H. Davies. in "Harper's. 



HAUNTED HOUSE 

Here was a place where none would ever come 
For shelter, save as we did from the rain. 
We saw no ghost, yet once outside again. 
Each wondered why the other should be dumb; 
For we had fronted nothing worse than gloom 
And ruin, and to our vision it was plain 
Where thrift, outshivering fear, had let remain 
Si niie chairs that were like skeletons of home. 

There were no trackless footsteps on the floor 
Above us. and there were no sounds elsewhere. 
But there was more than sound and there was more 
Than just an ax that once was in the air 
Between us and the chimney, long before 
Our time. So townsmen said who found her there. 
— Edwin Arlington Robinson, in "Century." 



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25 r to 50% off 

We hardly need to remind you of the unexcelled 
nuality and incomparable style of Gassner furs. 
These extreme reductions, therefore, should at- 
tract widespread attention — and bring in imme- 
diate response. Consequently, early buying is 
strongly recommended. 

No >l;.il Orders 

LOUIS GASSNER, Inc. 

112 GEARY STREET Near GRANT AVENUE 



;mu;ir\ 1". 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



NEW LIGHT TO ALL AUTOISTS 
\ afetj light has heen designed to make night driving 
secure. Manufactured by the McKay Manufacturing Com- 
pany of S:m Francisco the device has been given the trade 
name of "Auto Pas." The "Auto Pas" is a twenty-cine can- 
dle power three way block system for the individual motor 
car. It consists of a triangular-shaped instrument that is 
attached close to the front fender on the side of the left 
running board. It casts a green light forward that has an 
even greater visibility than the headlights. An equally 
strong red light throws a reflection to the rear. Both of 




An important feature of the Auto-Pas Safety Light is the pene- 
trative qualities of the colored lights to the front and rear. In 
heavy fog or rain they penetrate more efficiently than a white 
light, providing warning that must be heeded by other cars at dan- 
gerous intersections or curves. 

these lights penetrate fog- and rain, and can be seen for 
an amply safe distance in all kinds of weather. A wdiite 
light underneath defines a clear safety zone, six feet long 
and fourteen inches wide, on the road at the left side of 
the car. 

These lights act as a warning signal to the front, rear 
and left, and at the same time as a safety guide to the on- 
coming or overtaking motorists. The green light difuses 




The Auto-Pas Safety Llghl in position on left running board. 
It burns n twenty-one candle power tipless bulb, which feeds 
directly from the battery, and throws green light forward, red 
tight to the rear ami a while path of light upon the road 
teen inches wide by six feet long. 

the glare of the headlights and shows the approaching 
driver the exact position of the extreme edge of the other 
driver's car. As the passing driver comes nearer the white 
light casts its reflection on the ground, fourteen inches to 
the left, so that the passing driver can direct his wheel 
right through the center of this path of light and Mill have 
the legal foot ami a half clearance. 

This unusual light In- the endorsement of the State Mo- 
tor \ chicle Department. The light after repeated tests has 

been found to greatly lessen the danger of sideswiping, col- 
lision at intersection or of forcing the passing car off the 
road mto the ditch. 



The results of the headlight search and research are 
startling to most of us when we understand that 73.2 per 
cent of the lamps tested were out of focus. You know how 
it feels to be driving along- a slippery, skidds pavement 
some black, rainy night and all of a sudden to have an ap- 
proaching car almost blind you with its powerful lights 
whose beams have gone astray due to the neglect of the 
owner. 

If the figures are impartially represent ative — there is 
every reason to believe that they are — you may expect to 
be nearly blinded by the unsatisfactory lights of 73.2 out 
of every 100 motor vehicles that you meet. These facts and 
figures are astounding enough to keep timid motorists at 
home mi stormy night, when the dangers from improperly- 
adjusted headlights are maximum. 

Realizing the great toll in lives and property that auto- 
motive traffic today is taking through the nation, the en- 
gineers of the McKay Manufacturing Company of San 
Francisco developed their light. Before the "Auto Pas" 
light was marketed it was demonstrated to upwards of a 
thousand people, including- dealers, owners, country and 
city officials, lighting engineers and insurance experts. The 
light has received the indorsement of safety engineers, in- 
surance companies and thousands of individuals. 

— There is no one of the men which Great Britain has 
let us have, at one time and another, who deserves greater 
credit than Dr. Elwood Meade of the University of Cali- 
fornia. He has just finished a journey of forty thousand 
miles after helping to settle land settlement trouble in 
New South Wales, and giving the Rothschilds the benefit 
of his knowledge in settling the Palestine matter. A man 
who can do that sort of thing is much to be envied. I can- 
not imagine any more worthy career to present to the 
young. 

fHOO miles along thc^ 
| Ocean Shore * 

h sec California's 

g Coast Line in 

g comfort by using 

I DAYLIGHT LIMITED 

g — coaches, short-order 

dim; fire observation 

car 
Leave Third StStation 7^5 am 
Arrive Los Angeles $5Qpm 

in all the nvrld 
no trip like this 



i 

8 ASK AGENT 

1 Southern Pacific 

v_ M __„__ 



j 



50 Post siti'i FVrry Station 

Third Street Station — Batter 1000 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 19, 1924 




By ANTISTHENES 

— Odd as it may seem, our newest police judge, right 
or wrong, will decide all cases by the Golden rule. 



— In view of the appalling increase of female criminals 
in Califoria is not this the acceptable time to establish 
equality of sex — particularly in the matter of hanging? 

— There's something in the suggestion that the old city 
cemeteries be made auto parks! Convenient — especially if 
undertaking parlors be located hard by. 

— Leon Trosky has opened a campaign for "sounder crit- 
icism" of him and his works! Hard to tell where he'll get 
anything new in that line unless we coin further oppro- 
briums. 



— How opinii ns vary! 'While it is proposed by the Pub- 
lic Spirit Club to work fi r an increase of pay for all su- 
perior judges, another element is about to propose their 
"honors" work a longer shift to expedite justice. 



— Apropos a recent supervisoral meeting: "I dispute that, 
Mr. McLaren;" "Sit down. Mr. McSheehy." Now had Mc- 
Sheehy been elected mayor, might the dialogue have been: 
"I dispute that, Mr. McLaren"; "I'll sit down then. Mr. Mc- 
Sheehv"? 



— Relative to the Kels' case, may we now expect an 
impetus in the life insurance business with prospective 
murderers signing up for heavy policies? Like making 
"friends of the Mammom of Iniquity," the companies will 
see to it the criminals are ably defended. 



— California, with a rate of 26 per cent, leads all the 
states of the union in man-killing automobiles and we bid 
fair to retain the grewsome championship so long as we 
have traffic violations winked at. judges giving joke sen- 
tences and nobody sent to the penitentiary. 



— "Your degree of success may be determined by the 
size of your hat. Big heads, unless the bone is thick, are 
sure to be successful." says Dr. YVingate Todd of Cleve- 
land. That "unless the bone, etc." is ample alibi for num- 
erous large human domes we have met. 



— An electrician familiar with high power electrical trans- 
mission may secure a permanent position by applying to the 
authorities at Hunsville. Texas. Warden Coleman there 
has resigned because he was requested to electrocute sev- 
eral murderers. 



MURPHY 

Rather a fighting sobriquet, and, naturally, around it 
should swirl the maelstrom of combat. The San Francisco 
fire chief, christened Thomas Murphy, seems, presently, 
bait for the assorted political famished looking for his de- 
capitation and -why? Murphy occupies an appointive po- 
sition of good salary — he lives in a mansion supplied rental- 
free by the mrivcipality. Isn't that deemed sufficient cause 
to whet des're of various and sundry to see him back slid- 
ing down the long brass pole, drying hose and stoking en- 
gines? And is anyone anxiously awaiting his demotic in? 
Why. there are on tap a score or more of the "fully quali- 
fied," anxious to land a job like Murphy's, so, it behooves 



Thomas to do all in his power to hold on — but this is what 
Murphy refuses to do. 

Murphy is primarily a fire fighter — one from the ranks 
—who has learned through thirty years' service to put out 
blazes; his boss is the fire commissioners who know all 
about the cheery club and home fires and politics. They 
have ideas about running the department and Murphy has 
sundry ditto which the big corporations, the fire insur- 
ance companies and householders deem effective in sub- 
duing conflagrations, but it seems Murphy's notions are 
at variance with the commissioners', and that's against him. 
Then. Murphy believes in discipline; his brothers in 
the Scannel Club. — a firemen's association of tendencies 
somewhat social, a great deal political and mostly anti- 
Murphial — believe in it like Satan is enamoured of holy 
water. Mere rumor had it. their suffrage was to go nigh 
en bloc to him who would uncrown (or. is it "crown"?) 
the belligerent Murphy and now it seems the I. O. U. is 
crowding to maturity. 

So. these things interposing, the prospects are dire for 
the chief and should make him regret his zealous inclin- 
ing^. It'^ all illogical to expect him to quit fighting blazes 
effectively and to quit his disciplining, but it seems he 
must if he would hold that nice job and the accompanying 
emoluments. Who would be his successor? From the po- 
litical side it really doesn't matter much so long as he prom- 
ises to act differently from Murphy, who, as a wag noted 
it. "put out the blazes but raised hell." If some of the 
laddies inclined to take a nip of prevolstead. they should 
have it; should it irk them to turn out these chilly nights 
to save the city, they must be let to slumber on; poor 
Murphy put these things behind him as he would Satan, 
and all manner of evil thereafter followed hard on the heels 
of good intent. 

Hence it comes to pass that Murphy seems all bedecked 
for the sacrificial altar, while, hard pressed up against the 
funereal pyre, are embryo fire chiefs — a host of them — in 
exemplification of the scripture in that "where the body is. 
there shall the eagles be gathered together." 



Some weeks ago. in the Temple of Discord, the San 
Francisco News Letter published "How shall we build" — 
a line or so dealing with fads and fancies employed in erect- 
ing our public school buildings. Comes now a letter from 
President Dohrmann of the Hoard of Education taking us 
to task fir risking an opinion as to how we wanted our 
money spent. This lese majeste on our part toward the 
august body in charge of our schools was apparently re- 
sented, and. when we come to realize it. a certain temerity 
was ours in daring to meddle in the affairs of a hitherto 
uncriticized institution. Hence the sobriquet "crank" with 
which the president aureoled us is fitting and we are in- 
clined to subside into a state of attrition. 

However, "cranks" are proverbially untractible, and they 
will erupt if only to conform to tradition; in fact we choose 
to retort to President Dohrmann's invitation to attend 
Wednesday afternoon meetings of his board, by stating we 
prefer to utilize the time in visualizing further what has 
been done by the board rather than in listening to what 
they intend to do— all over again. Besides, we went to con- 
siderable delving among musty records to bring forth facts 
and figures anent the John Swett and Horace Mann schools' 
malconstruction, and Mr. Dohrmann made not a single 
controvertible peep about our findings. 

Now, if he promises to urge at next Wednesday's meet- 
ing the addition of three stories of classrooms (of which we 
are in sore need I to the almost block long one-storied bar- 
rack-like Horace Mann school out on Valencia street, we 
take oath we'll attend, if only to exult over the gratifying 
and edifying spectacle of a San Francisco Hoard of Educa- 
tion's taking programme from mere taxpayers with a lean- 
ing to the practical in schools construction. 



January 1". 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




By KEM 

"What is a book? \ series of little printed signs— essen- 
tially only that. It is for the reader to supply himself 
the liirnis and colors and sentiments to which these 
signs correspond. It will depend on him whether the 
book lie dull or brilliant, hot with passion or cold as 
ice. Or. if yon prefer to put it otherwise, each word 
in a book is a magic finger that sets a fiber of our brain 
vibrating like a harp-string, am l so evokes a note from 
the sounding board of our soul." — Anatole France. 

1HHE spring time rush of new books is not yet with us, 
L a few harbingers of vacation reading are here, but not 
digested enough to divert attention from the late fall out- 
put which is still being conned over. Miss Greenwood, in 
her recent lecture inspired her admiring coterie of readers 
to ask for THE WIFE OF THE CENTAUR by Cyril 
Hume: the first novel of a new writer, who has just ac- 
cepted twenty-five thousand for the picture rights for same ; 
DON JUAN by Ludwig Lewisohn, author of UP- 
STREAM; THE LATE MATTIA PASCAL bv Piran- 
dello, and YOUNG FELIX by Frank Swinnerton. which 
is not only being read for its literary and humorous in- 
terest, but also because Mr. Frank Swinnerton is to be in 
our midst February 8th for a lecture and reception, and 
of course we want to be able to say that we have read his 
last book. 

The visit of another English celebrity, Miss Rebecca 
West, has been postponed on account of illness. She was 
to have been the guest of Mrs. Gertrude Atherton, and to 
have been entertained by the WRITERS at dinner in their 
newly acquired nook at the Bohemian Club. She is now 
expected to be here in March, and interested ones who have 
not yet read her famous novelette THE RETURN OF 
THE SOLDIER are now doing so; also her not-so-famous 
THE JUDGE. Able critics say the first hundred pages 
are unsurpassed, but the average reader leaves it to noted 
critics like Sinclair Lewis to be enthusiastic about the re- 
mainder. 

* * * 

The first of the Spring poets is in a jocular vein, and is 
called — 

LOCKER K()()M BALLADS by John E. Baxter. It is 
a hilarious little book of verse for those "who play, or try 
to play." the great games of gulf and tennis and polo. It 
is illustrated b\ James Montgomery Flagg, and the spirit 
in which it is written is ably revealed in: 
"TENNIS, OH, TENNIS" 
"I'll play Polo when I'm wealthy, 
I'll play Golf when I am old. 
Ami my knee-caps start to rattle 
And my blood is running cold. 
But Tennis! Ah. you said it! 
There was never thrill as yet 
To equal lofett wallops 
That go ducking o'er the net. 
There is exercise in tennis 
And there's 'love' in tennis, too, 
You're a sprinter and a jumper 
And a touch of kangai i 
Also the titles of his poems: "A Golfer's Kickability," 
"Polo— a He-Man's Game" will further commend it to the 
lo\ cvs of these game-. 
H. Appleton I Co., $1.25. 



TWO NO-TRUMP, by Gertrude Myers, is a novel giv- 
ing "a cross-section of life in a large Chicago apartment 
hotel." It is read with zest by those who are interested in 
a certain type of woman, who drinks deeply, bets wildly 
on cards, and divorces surplus husbands, — a contrast to the 
modern man. who, according to Vance Thompson, is "grog- 
gily and sulkily" trying to climb out of this self same 
muddy, messy way of living in order to keep his women 
folks on the old pedestal of good behavior — where she stood 
so long. Evidently this sort of woman has determined that 
she won't stand there any longer — alone. 

Covici-Mcgee Co., $2. 



A DAINTY BOOK OF POEMS 

From the Cloister Press comes the little volume: "From 
a Rose Jar," by Louise A. Doran. Here is a young Cali- 
fornian, member of the California Poetry Club, who shows 
much promise ; for her lyrics are not filled with her own 
emotions, — which seems to be the tendency of the modern 
poet, — rather they strive to portray philosophies gathered 
from Nature's teachings. Here she pictures : 
TAMALPAIS 
In never ending sleep she lies, 

Uplifted to the sky, 
A symbol of Death's happiness 

To us, who all must die. 
With cloudless azure overhead, 
And green hills far below. 
With flowers wreathed within her hair, 

Strewn on her bosom's snow, 
She slumbers ; at her feet the world 
In bitterness and woe. 

The Cloister Press : 75c. 



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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 19, 1924 




BUSY CUPID 

MRS. JOHN" H. FULLER announced the engagement of her niece. 
Miss Adele Nilon. to Mr. George Fairfield Hampton, at a 
luncheon given tor the bride-elect at the Fuller home in In- 
gleside terrace. Miss Nilon is the daughter of Judge and 
Airs. F. T. Nilon of Nevada City, and the granddaughter of 
the late John T. Morgan, pioneer banker of Nevada county. 
Mr. Hampton is the son of the late Elisha and Mrs. Hamp- 
ton of Monrovia. The marriage will take place in the early 
spring, and the couple will make their home in San Francisco. 

MISS JOSEPHINE DROWN and Mr. Jerd Sullivan's engagement 
is announced. Miss Drown is the daughter of Mr. Willard N. 
Drown of this city and Mrs. Robert Dunham of Chicago and 
a granddaughter of Mrs. Edgar Preston. She is a niece of 
Mrs. Harry H. Scott, Miss Newell Drown and Mr. Frank Pres- 
ton of Medford, Ore. Mr. Willard N. Drown Jr. is a brother. 

MISS MARION GIBBS and .Mr. William Alston Hayne Jr.. whose 
engagement was announced in November, will be married at 
the bride's home in Pasadena the latter part of this month. 
Several members of the bridegroom's family will go south 
for the wedding, which will be an important event in Pasa- 
dena society. Miss Gibbs is the daughter of Judge and Mrs. 
G. A. Gibbs of Pasadena. Mr. Hayne is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Alston Hayne of San Francisco. 

MISS VERONICA BYRNES, daughter of William Byrnes of San 
Rafael, has announced her engagement to Fabian McCarthy, 
son of -Mrs. {Catherine McCarthy of San Francisco. The wed- 
ding will take place in the spring. Miss Byrnes is one of 
the belles of the Marin county set. She is a sister of Misses 
Kathleen and Gertrude Byrnes and of Charles W. Byrnes. 
The family formerly lived in San Francisco, where the Misses 
Byrnes continue to share in the social diversions of the young 
girls of their own years. 

MISS ALICE DOBLE. daughter of Mrs. Robert McFadden of 
San Francisco and Denver, has announced her engagement to 
Mr. Kenneth Davis, son of Mr. and Mrs. Winfield Scott Davis 
of this city. The news is being told by the future bride to 
her friends in this city. Miss Doble is at present in Los An- 
geles, where she is the house guest of her brother-in-law and 
sister. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Weldon. the latter of whom will 
be remembered here as Miss Margaret Doble. She is a niece 
of Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Doble. at whose home in Sea Cliff 
she frequently visits. Mr. Davis is a brother of Mrs. Kenneth 
Macdonald Jr. and a nephew of Mrs. John Dempster McKee. 
The wedding will be solemnized in Los Angeles on March 
29, and will be attended by relatives and friends from San 
Francisco as well as from the south. 

MR. AND MRS. EUGENE BURFORD announce the engagement 
of their second daughter. Miss Louise Braden. to Dr. Claude 
Colonna of Virginia. The marriage, which will take place in 
a few weeks, will be at Grace Cathedral, followed by a re- 
ception at the Fairmont Hotel. Miss Braden is a sister of 
Mrs. Henry Clarence Breeden of New York city, who was 
recently here on a visit with the Braden family. Dr. Colonna 
comes of distinguished Italian ancestry, the family of the 
Colonnas having been for centuries one of the leading clans 
identified with affairs of state, church and society. 

.MISS GERTRUDE BANGS, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Franklin 
Bangs, announced her engagement to William L. Shaw of 
London and San Francisco. Tuesday, at a tea given by Mrs. 
P. L. Wheeler and Miss Pauline Wheeler, several score of 
the mutual friends of the several families attending the affair. 
The wedding date is February G. the couple leaving from 
New York on February 16 for Europe to be away six months 
or so. eventually returning to San Francisco to establish their 
residence. 

LUNCHEONS 

MISS JEANETTE NORRIS. whose engagement to Mr. Gerald 
Herrmann was recently announced, was the guest of honor 
at a luncheon given Monday by Miss Frances Ames. The 
affair was given at the home of the young hostess in Divisa- 
dero street. 

CAPTAIN AND MRS. GEORGE B. LANDENBERGER at Yerba 
Buena gave an attractive luncheon party Saturday, when Mrs. 
Landenberger entertained for Mrs. Simpson, the" wife of Ad- 
miral Edward Simpson, I'. S. N. 

MRS. ELEXAN'DER KEYES entertained Wednesday at luncheon 
for the debutantes, complimenting Miss Sophia Brownell. 



MR. AND MRS. EDWARD J. TOBIN entertained at a luncheon 
on Sunday at the San Mateo Polo Club in honor of several 
members of the visiting Del Monte team. Their honored 
guests were Mr. Hugh Drury, Major Holmes, U. S. A., and 
Captain Gibbs, U. S. A. The guests bidden to meet them in- 
cluded Mr. and Mrs. Cyril Tobin, Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo Aven- 
ali. Mr. and Mrs. William Gregory Parrott and Mr. and Mrs. 
Gordon Moore. 

MISS THERESE OLIVA gave a luncheon and surprise shower 
at the Fairmont Saturday for Miss Olive Rose Fugazi, whose 
engagement has been announced to George Brown. 

MISS CAROLINE MADISON, one of the season's debutantes, will 
be the honored guest at a luncheon to be given by Miss Ade- 
laide Sutro on Thursday, January 24, at the Woman's Ath- 
letic club. 

MRS. HORACE DAVIS PILLSBURY will entertain at a large 
luncheon next Tuesday for Miss Isabelle Bishop, one of the sea- 
son's debutantes. It will be held at the Town and Country 
Club and many of the same little group who will attend the 
luncheon will later be the guests of Miss Patience Winchester 
at a tea which she will give at the club the same day. The 
principal guest at the affair arranged by Miss Winchester 
will he Miss Helen House. 

MRS. ALEXANDER D. KEYES entertained at a luncheon Wed- 
nesday for Miss Sophie Brownell, the debutante daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. Edward Erie Brownell. and Mrs. Paige Mont- 
eagle was also hostess at a luncheon the same day to a 
group of the season's buds. 

TEAS 

MRS. NORMAN LIVERMORE has sent out cards for a tea to be 
given this Saturday to meet her sister-in-law, Mrs. Alfred 
Hurtgen. who, with her family, arrived during the Christ- 
mas season from Dresden, Germany, where the Hurtgen fam- 
ily lived for many years except for a period in Switzerland 
during the war. The Hurtgens, both of whom are musical and 
highly accomplished, will establish their permanent residence 
in San Francisco. The tea will be at the Livermore residence 
on Vallejo street, Russian Hill. 

MRS. EDWARD ERLE BROWNELL gave one of the largest and 
most elaborate teas of the winter last Thursday afternoon 
when she entertained in honor of her debutante daughter. 
Miss Sophia Brownell. The affair was given at the Brownell 
home in Broadway and several hundred guests called during 
the afternoon. Assisting Mrs. Brownell and her daughter in 
receiving were Mrs. Brownell's mother, Mrs. Ira Pierce: Mrs. 
Grayson Dutton, Mrs. Alexander D. Keyes, Mrs. Danforth 
Boardman, Mrs. Frank W. Fuller, Mrs. Norris King Davis, 
Mrs. Andrew P. Welch. Mrs. William Pierce Johnson. Mrs. 
George F. Towne. Mrs. Maxwell Milton, Mrs. Reginald Knight 
Smith. Miss Vera Talbot. Miss Betty Knight Smith. Miss Ida- 
belle Wheaton and Miss Betsy Dibblee. 

MRS. ARTHUR REDINGTON entertained at a small mah jongg 
party Tuesday afternoon at the Hotel Fairmont. 

MRS. WEBSTER W. JENNINGS will give a tea this Saturday aft- 
ernoon, at which Mrs. Charles Sedgwick Aiken and Dr. Mary 
Layman will be the honored guests. 

MRS. FRANK STRINGHAM has issued cards for a tea to be given 
on January 20 in honor of Mrs. Jessie Davis Nahl, who re- 
turned recently from a long sojourn abroad. Mrs. Frank 
Glass. Mrs. Henry May and Mrs. Arthur Rickard will be the 
assisting hostesses. 

DINNERS 

.Miss FLORENCE BOSTWICK was hostess at a small dinner 
Saturday, when she entertained 12 guests at her home. Aft- 
erward the party enjoyed the dance which Miss Harriet Win- 
ner gave. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

<;:><i liu-h Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Sun Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 




MARY HERETH 



i JONES £ 
:30, & 



Luncheon is served from 1 I : 30 to 2 

and tea from 3 to 5 g 

**£^2gV 334 SUITER STREET Douglas 71 18 £ 



|amiar\ 19, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM MAYO NEWHALL JR. were hosts at 
a dinner party Tuesday evening in honor of .Mrs. Ferdinand 
Theriol whose return from France lias been marked by many 
affairs. The Newhalls were guests of Mrs. Theriot when they 
were abroad last year. 

MR. AND MRS. WALTER KAMM were dinner hosts Saturday 
nigh) at their home in Burlingame when they entertained a 
dozen guests. Afterward the group n paired to the Burlingame 
Country Club, where was held the Subscription ball. 

MISS ELIZABETH TERRY was a dinner hostess at the home of 
her parents, Dr. and Mrs. Wallace I. Terry. Friday evening 
when she made Dr. and Mrs. Dohrmann Pischel her guests 
of honor. 

MR. MANSFIELD AND MR. JOSEPH LOVELL entertained at a 
dinner on Saturday evening at the Hotel St. Francis, when 
they were hosts to a group of their young friends. The party 
was chaperoned by Mr. and Mrs. A. Gordon Nicholson, and 
the other guests were Miss Francesca Deering, Miss Marie 
and Miss Florence Welch, Miss Idabelle Wheaton, Miss So- 
phia Brownell. Miss Kathryn Chace, Miss Eleanor Morgan, 
Mr. Merrill Morsehead, Mr. Carl Adam, Mr. Clift Lunborg, 
Mr. Oliver Dibblee and Mr. John Brooke Jr. 

MR. AND MRS. AUGUSTUS TAYLOR were dinner hosts at their 
home in Van Ness avenue on Thursday evening. 

BRIDGE 

MR. AND MRS. DRUMMOND McGAVIN entertained at an in- 
formal bridge and supper party last Friday evening at their 
home on Broderick street in honor of Mr. and Mrs. John 
Pigott of Sacramento. The evening was enjoyed by fourteen 
guests. 

COLONEL AND MRS. JOHN CHAMBERS were hosts at the Pre- 
sidio Saturday night, entertaining a party at supper and 
bridge at their quarters. 

MR. AND MRS. HENRY HOWARD SHIELDS entertained recent- 
ly with a bridge supper at their home on Pacific avenue. The 
gathering is the first of a semi-monthly series planned by the 
hosts for the coming weeks. 
MR. AND MRS. E. C. McMILLIAN entertained Friday evening at 
their home in Balboa Terrace with a bridge supper for Mr. 
and Mrs. Frederick L. Maratt of New York. 
MISS MARGARET CHENEY was hostess at an attractive bridge 
tea last Monday at the Woman's Athletic Club. Assisting 
Miss Cheney in receiving were Miss Helen Head, Miss Alysse 
Allen, Miss Alta Nolan and Mrs. Dohrmann Pischel. 
DANCES 
MR. AND MRS. CHARLES NOBLE entertained Friday evening 
at the Claremont Country Club with a large dance! A num- 
ber of the debutantes and young men crossed the bay for the 
affair, and several were house guests of Mr. and Mrs. Noble 
for the week-end. 
TOWN AND COUNTRY SOCIETY had I he pleasure of joining 
in a most enjoyable dance on Saturday night, this due to the 
capable management of a coterie of Burlingame hostesses who 
arranged a subscription dance at the Burlingame Country 
Club. About two hundred and fifty participated in the affair, 
a round of dinner parties preceding the dance. The clubrooms 
were gay with Bowers and greenery, no formal decorative 
scheme being attempted beyond the usual largo baskets anil 
jardinieres that set off the place. ' 
MESSRS. MANSFIELD and JOSEPH LOVELL were hosts at a 
dinner dance on Saturday evening at the Hotel St. Francis. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholson, the latter a sister of the Mi 
Lovell, chaperoning the party. 
MRS. CHARLES R. McCORMICK has be,.,, spending the winter 
abroad, and a little group of her friends have arranged a 
dinner and dance to be held at the San Francisco Golf and 
Country Club on Wednesday evening. January 23 Mra Mc- 
Cormick and Mrs. William S. Porter, who have been travel- 
in Europe together, arrived in New York last Thursday and 
are expected home on Sunday. 
MISS MARGERY DAVIS, debutante daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Norris King Davis, was the honored guest of Mr, and Mrs 
Horace Davit. PHlsbury who entertained a theater party Tues- 
day evening. The group of 10, after the performance at the 
Orpheuin. went 1,, the Hotel St. Francis for supper and danc- 
ing. 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Vitn Nesg Are., at Geary Street 



SAN KKAM INCO 



Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 

El.MER M. WOODBVRY Mutineer 



WAMPAS BALL— Society is very interested in the first big mov- 
ing picture ball given in San Francisco. The Wainpas Frolic 
is scheduled for this Saturday evening and many box parties 
are planned tin the occasion. The very fact that this affair, 
which heretofore has been a Los Angeles annual event, should 
have been moved to San Francisco and that all the Los An- 
ge'enos desiring to attend are coming north in special trains, 
lends interest to the affair. The Civic Auditorium will be 
decorated in green and white, the Wampas colors. 
THE ANNUAL BACHELORS' BALL will be held on the extra 
day, February 29, with the picturesque setting of the club 
house of the San Francisco Jockey Club at Tanforan as the 
place for the ball. The hosts, as in years past, are the bach- 
elors whose names make up the dancing list at the debutante 
balls and other similar affairs of each season. At the end of 
every season, it has been their courteous custom to show 
heir appreciation of a winter's hospitality by giving the finest 
kind of a party that their fastidious and discriminating tastes 
can devise. The group of young men who are managing the 
Bachelors Ball this year are Messrs. Harry Crocker, Raymond 
Armsby, Cyril McNear, George Montgomery, Alfred Hendrick- 
son, Frank Kennedy. Harold Spreckels and Brooks"walker 
THE MISSES MARIE AND FLORENCE WELCH will be hostesses 
at a dance which they will give on February 1, at the An- 
drew Welch home on Broadway. It will be for the debutante 
set, including some of the young married couples who have 
been attending the balls of the winter 
MRS. I. W. HELLMANN was hostess at one of the most pic- 
turesque and lovely of the dinner dances of this winter hav- 
ing several score friends in honor of her daughter, Miss' Flor- 
ence Hellmann. The party took place in the ballroom of the 
Hotel St. Francis on Saturday evening. Miss Florence Hell- 
mann is one of the debutantes for whom there has been con- 
siderable entertaining in the circle with which the Hellmann 
family is identified. ln 

IX TOWN AND OUT 

MISS JOSEPHINE AND MISS EDITH GRANT left the first of 
. S L Wee £ for New York and arrived in time for the wedding 
of Miss Renee Carhart and Mr. George Sullivan Amory, which 
took place on Saturday. The bride visited the Grants at Bur- 
lingame and in San Francisco last year. The wedding was 
a society event in New York and took place at the home of 
the bride's grandmother. Mrs. Henry D. Brookman The 
bride's sister-in-law, Mrs. Amory S. Carhart. was matron of 
honor and Miss Josephine Grant was maid of honor Amory 
S Carhart Jr. was a page. Mr. S. Elliot Guild of Boston was 
the best man. 

MR. AND MRS. BULKELEY WELLS and Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
H. Scott, who have been away on a motor trip in the coun- 
try out of Marysville. have returned to their respective homes 
in this city. 

MR. GEORGE R. F. NUTTAL is visiting his aunt. Mrs. J. R K 
Nuttall. at her home in Jackson street and is being enter- 
tamed by friends of the family. The young man is a son of 
Professor G. H. F. Nuttall. of Cambridge University, who is 
one of the noted bacteriologists of the world. His grand- 
father was the late Dr. R. K. Nuttall of this city. 

MR. AND MRS GEORGE Q. CHASE left their home in Piedmont 
Saturday tor a tour of the Eastern states, with their home 
m Casco Bay. Maine, as Hen principal objective. Thev will 
spend several (lays of thei,- nip with their daughter, Miss 
Helen (base, who is a student at Pine Manor, Wellesley 

MRS FREDERICK MOOD") lias gone to Palis t,, be with her 
Sister, Mrs. Beverly MacMonaglO, whose serious illness is a 

matter of much concern to her relatives and friends Mrs. 
MacMonagle has resided in Paris for the past three years, 



>IHS. .1. I). SPR ECKELS PASSES AWAY \T CORONADO 

Uvea and friends of Mrs. .1. D. Spreckels were shocked 
and grieved at the announcement of her death on the morning 
of Jan. 9th at Coronad... after an Illness of one no. nth. In ad- 
dition to her husband, she is survived by one son. Clans Spreck- 
els of Coronado. and two daughters. Mrs. Paul Wegeforth of 
Coronado, and Mrs Grace Hamilton of San Francisco. Three 
sisters also survive Mrs. Spreckels, these being Mrs Walter Gib- 
son of San Francisco. Mrs L. A. Consmiller of New York and 
Miss Minnie C. Siebein of Coronado 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Mnke Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Salter tlSO 



L'nder Management CARL S STA.VLET 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 19. 1924 






ijnNANgAy 



By P. N. BERINGER 

QUITE naturally the business man and others turn 
their thoughts just now to the preparation of their in- 
come tax returns. And, also, logically they are interest- 
ed in any reliable tips which may be given. It is necessary to 
know that if you are single and support in your home one 
or more re'atives. over whom you exercise family control, 
you are the head of a family and entitled, in your income 
tax return for 1923. to the SAME exemptions granted a 
married person. These are $2500 if the net income was 
$5000 or less, and $2000 if the net income was more than 
$5000. In addition, the head of a family may claim $400 
for each person dependent upon him for chief support, if 
such person is under eighteen years of age. or incapable 
of self-support because of mental or physical defects. An 
exemption as the head of a family can be claimed by only 
one member of a household. 

Germany's Ability 

Germany's ability to pay its debt to France and other 
nations is now being threshed out by General Dawes and 
his assistants. It is firmly believed that this committee 
will arrive at tangible results. Whatever they do arrive 
at, if unaccepted by the creditors of Germany or if ac- 
cepted, France moves not one inch from the Ruhr or any 
other sections it may be deemed wise for her to occupy 
until Germany begins to show some signs of returning hon- 
esty. General Dawes is a very forceful gentleman and a 
capable one in everything he undertakes, but it is reason- 
able to suppose that he will be unable to do any more than 
arrive at what he and his committee, in their aggregate 
wisdom, find Germany may be able to pay. 
* * * 

Brokerage Men on Trial 

The members of the brokerage firm of Eisemann et al 
who are on trial for a conspiracy to violate the corporate 
securities act, have now had more than eight weeks of a 
most thorough investigation and much has been said in 
court that is detrimental to the accused. These are Jesse 
Jaques Eisemann, Holmes Ives, and N. J. Welch. One 
thing may be truly advanced, and that is. that the evidence 
which has been advanced for and against conviction has 
been most thoroughly analyzed. No one wants to see in- 
nocent, though it may be apparently guilty, people suffer, 
but if the charges presented by the prosecution are proved 
true, the accused should be given the limit of the law as 
penalties for their alleged crimes. 

The Motion Picture People 

The Chamber of Commerce has found it necessary, it 
seems, to make known through the Press that they are 
not offering more than special inducements to those who 
wish to migrate from Hollywood to San Francisco. The 
Chamber authorities say they know that equal, if not bet- 
ter, opportunities exist here for producing pictures. The 
fact is, that pictures of a very superior character have al- 
ready been made in the vicinity of San Mateo and San 
Rafael and the legitimate producer is welcomed and given 
every possible inducement to come here. Motion picture 
people spend money quite freely and the expenditure is a 
continual one. Those who achieve fame on the screen also 
spend their money generously, so there should be no com- 
plaint if there is a migration from Hollywood. 



Pacific Trade Association 

The Pacific Trade Association is about to start a pub- 
licity and advertising campaign to let the world at large 
know that this is the best port of the Pacific United States. 
It is word to the wise to say to Mr. W. O. Banks, who is 
president of the association, and to his associates that the 
mistake made by others who have essayed to advertise San 
Francisco should not be repeated. That mistake has con- 
sisted in very carefully avoiding spending any of the money 
for publicity and advertising purposes in mediums published 
in San Francisco. 

California Banks 

The conditions surrounding business ventures and in- 
dustrial establishments in California were so very good in 
1923 that the most favorable report must be given of their 
accomplishment in money results. Let us make a few- com- 
parisons. In 1914. the capital, surplus and undivided profits, 
of the banks is given in the following figures: San Fran- 
cisco, as of October 31st, 85,000,000;" in 1923, as of Sep- 
tember 14th. $130,000,000. Los Angeles, under the same 
dates : $30,000,000 and $63,000,000. and Oakland, at the same 
periods. $8,000,000 and $12,000,000. Now. just watch the 
State grow — San Francisco's total resources today are $1.- 
311.000.000 as against the sum of $539,000,000 in 1914, at 
the same date. But look to what heights Oakland has 
climbed since she held third place in 1914. Oakland's total 
resources, in 1914, were given as $214,000,000 and at this 
time they are placed at $833,000,000. while Los Angeles is 
given the third place with the figures for 1914 of $63.- 

000,000 and the record for 1923 $135,000,000. 

* * * 

The Market Street System 

The net income of the Market Street Railway Company, 
for 1923, was increased very sensibly over the figures of 
1''22. Phis increase amounted to $352,02 l > and the total 
amount of the net earnings was $1,418,020. I mention this 
fact simply for the purpose of showing how men. who are 
professionally trained to work for a traffic corporation, 
bring about very flattering results, while those who work 
for cities, in like capacity, usually only serve to show the 
lack of skill they may possess and the easy way in which 
they may spell a deficit at the end of a year of operation. 
Right there is found the difference between municipal or 
state operation of public utilities and that which is oper- 
ated by a corporation, whose officers and wage earners 
have been trained to their duties and to care for these duties 
in a way that is efficient and along the lines of least re- 
sistance, as to expense. And this must not be taken as an 
argument, in favor or against, the Municipal Railway man- 
agement of San Francisco because the people, having ex- 
pressed their wishes in the matter, the San Francisco News 
Letter is in favor of the purchase of the Market Street Rail- 
w ay Company, by the city, and that should be done just 
as quickly as it is possible to so do, in conformity with the 
desires of the voters of the city. 

* * * 

Mining in California and Nevada 

Mining interests are looking forward to a great activity, 
in all of the camps of both states. This is especially true of 
the section around Grass Valley, in California, and Tonopah 
and Goldfield, in Nevada. 1923 saw greater activity than 
1922 but this activity, while it was expected, did not begin 
until it was too late in the season to show any very great 
clean-up. Grass Valley, it seems, has not quieted down at 
all this winter. The people in the vicinity of the old camp 
are convinced that Grass Valley is destined to draw atten- 
tion to itself through the big developments of 1924. 



— The meanest man has been found: a foreign diploma! 
stationed in Washington refuses to allow a Congressman 
occasional access to his exempted cellar. 



January 19, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



TownMLCrier 




J) WHO THE DEVIL ART THOU 

"ONE THATWILL PLAY THE 
j PEVIL.SIR WITH VOW 

— Shakspeare* , 



— So, they are going after the Crime Commission in Los 
Angeles, and by "they" we mean Cornelius Vanderbilt Jr. 
in particular. This is a crusade in which we wish him the 
hest of luck and hope that he may bring home the bacon. 
But he must do better than call it "the most insidious ma- 
chine that has ever had the state within its grasp." That 
is so very common, and there have been so many such in- 
sidious machines, that to get publicity he will really have 
to do better. 

— The story of William Pierson Hamilton, descendent 
of Alexander Hamilton, former son in law of J. Pierpont 
Morgan, and a partner in the firm of J. P. Morgan and Com- 
pany, being held up here because there was not attached 
to his passport-declaration a certificate of his marriage, is 
one of the most ridiculous applications of the rules that has 
ever been heard of. The passport system is an unmitigated 
nuisance and persists, because there is profit to be made 
from it. 

— A very sweeping decision has just been handed down 
by the Circuit Court of Appeals of the United States here, 
that motor vehicles which are used for illegal purposes un- 
der the national prohibition act and seized, are recover- 
able by the legal owner. This will put the local dry forces, 
which have been confiscating motor cars, in a very awk- 
ward position. It was obvious to anybody with intelligence 
that the high banded methods of the prohibition-enforce- 
ment people could not be maintained. 
* * * 

— We thought that the old town was well off last year 
and now we know it. The report of the Commissioner of 
Corporations shows that there were fift) per cent more 
brokers and agents operating in the state than ever before. 
They must eat and to eat must get investors and investors 
must have the money to invest. Hence there must have 
been lots of loose money, and loose money means pros- 
perity. There is a syllogism that cannot he contradicted. 
Eh?' 



— There i- a terrible bother going on about the use of 
the word "doctor." All the regulars are combining to col- 
lect a fund so as to undertake an agitation which will put 
a stop to people using the title There is a fine ecclesiastical 
twang about all this. There is evidently money in the title 
"doctor." Of course the regulars say that the dear people 
are being deceived and that doctors who are not doctors 
are getting the money. I loop la! what's the odds? It is 
no worse to be killed by a quack without a diploma. Why 
SO serious, gentlemen? 

— The attorney general has issued a notice that all the 
legal forces of the state will support the governor in his 
efforts to uphold the neutrality law and prevent any as- 
sistance going from this state to the rebels in Mexico. We 
have no quarrel with that, but we point out the difference 
between this and the Madero revolution, when arms were 
openly solicited for the revolutionists in public meetings in 
San Francisco. This is a very distinct change of attitude. 

* # # 

— Fate ruled that Samuel W. Cheyney, one of our best 
known mining engineers should have been burned to death 
in his ranch home in Butte County, ft is a miserable con- 
clusion to a career that promised to be one of the most 
brilliant of what was twenty years ago the coming group 
of mining engineers. Things like this drive us back to the 
old philosophers and the implacability of destiny. As for 

the rest. Samuel Cheyney did good work. 

* * * 

— They are talking about taxing bachelors. That would 
not hurt the bachelors; on the contrary, it would give them 
a justification for existence. Many men would not think 
of marrying if there were not a sort of slackness attaching 
to the bachelor. If, on the other hand, he pays taxes, he 
will have avoided the stigma and paid for his right to free- 
dom ; thus winning exemption from the tolls and burdens 
of matrimony. If I were a girl, 1 should be against the 
bachelor tax. 

— The Breed Traffic Act breathes again; the third district 
court of appeal, after clubbing it into unconsciousness, pro- 
duced a restorative and set it on its feet. It is still a hit 
wobbly, but may survive. It was all on a question of sal- 
aries, and in the afterglow of Christmas generosity, it is 
held that the salaries may be paid. So now we have a 
traffic officer who can get his money. Next prayer; May 
he do his work ! 



— As part of the reaction against the commission idea. 
we get irate refusal of District' Attorney Keyes to listen 
any more to the recommendations of the so called Crime 
Commission in Los Angeles, lie says that the commis- 
sion wants to use him to invoke the penal law against their 
political enemies. We don't doubt it lor a moment. Com- 
missions do just that sort of thing. The Progressives who 
overwhelmed us with commissions laid on our hacks a bur- 
den too grievous to he home. Time will come when they 
will speak of this epoch as the tyranny by commission. 



— ( lakland may produce a poetical policeman hut accord- 
ing to reports she also produces a thieving fireman. One 
of Oakland's firemen is charged with taking a diamond 
ring during a fire. It is to the credit of the nrefighting fra- 
ternity that such ;m incident is more than surprising; it is 

almost appalling. 

* * * 

— Major Wellington Belford is very like Wellington W. 
Wells of sorcerer fame. He has the faculty of absorbing 
money, girls and military titles, an omniverous rogue. 




MCVIim WHO. RAMI 
OADUETCHTttlNO. 
CtVCS MtrtCT CMS. ■ 

TSIBUTION 0« r*CM 

At.ATALLTlNCS. . 
HO XATTMCO »/,.€•• 



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MEK.I CAM 
W I I* -O O W 

WINDSHIELD 



COMPANY 



77 O'r AORELL ST. 
SAN FRANCI SCO 



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CVNItlT. * 



CAL. 



MCYtKTt ALL 

DtMPA'S ETC 

to $6iiU>6«Tott.cutmitrt 
dcidchs sneer »«*£"- 

Telephone. Svtter 5335, 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

( OMMI8SION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 ttnih Street 

Phone K**my 1726 San Francisco. C*L 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 19. 1924 



PLEASURE'S WW 




OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

Tom Moone. 



Nazimova in New Play at Orpheum 

"That Sort" as a play is a disappoint- 
ment. Nazimova herself never could 
be, and again she proves herself an 
emotional actress of exceptional pow- 
er and appeal. Basil MacDonald Hast- 
ings undoubtedly wrote the play to af- 
ford her a wide rang"e of the emotions, 
and that it does. But there is nothing 
else to recommend it. Nazimova plays 
the part of a dope addict on the verge 
of suicide, found fainting in a hotel bed- 
room when the pistol she has bought 
refuses to go off. A celebrated doctor, 
guest in the same hotel, is called to 
her room in the emergency. Nazimova 
comes out of her faint and tells the 
story of her life as "That Sort" to the 
doctor, laying all her agony to the 
mother love which has consumed her 
for sixteen years since her husband 
won her child in their divorce proceed- 
ings. There is nothing convincing 
about the argument of either the moth- 
er or the doctor, but Nazimova tears 
at the heart strings when she pleads 
the injustice of losing her child. When 
the doctor has departed, Nazimova 
fights a winning battle between her de- 
sire for the drug and her promise to 
the doctor to leave it alone, with an 
intensity that is particularly her own 
and inimitable. 

"Two Noble Nuts," Rockwell and 
Fox, are back again with a new line 
of amusing patter, mostly aug'mented 
by a bunch of bananas, real bananas, 
which they offer as prizes for applause. 
Enid Markey is a weeping bride in 
"Here Goes the Bride." As a skit the 
best thing to be said for it is that it 
can best serve as a warning to all pos- 
sible bridegrooms to remain single, but 
both Miss Markey and Dorothy Cox, 
who plays the bridesmaid, wear charm- 
ing gowns. 

The Arnaut Brothers do a novel act, 
showing themselves unusually clever 
and versatile entertainers. In fetching- 
clown attire of black and yellow they 
play the violin while performing real- 
ly difficult acrobatics. This is followed 
by their inimitable bird duet, in which 
they are amusingly costumed and their 
warblings most bird-like. 

Madelyn Meredith and Danny Dug- 
gan do an attractive dancing act, open- 
ing with a Spanish dance that is full of 
pep and gracefully executed. Johnny 
Burke, hold-over from last week, in 
"Drafted" gets another ovation. Mar- 
garet Young in some of the favorite 



songs, and an interesting news reel 
complete the current bill. 



Remarkable Play at Alcazar 

Even those familiar with "Anna 
Christie" in play form, and aware of 
the fact that it won the Pulitzer Prize 
as the best play of last year, have a 
surprise in store for them at the Al- 
cazar during the present engagement. 
The acting of Pauline Lord and of 
George Marion in the leading roles is 
unexcelled. Miss Lord has created a 
character so remarkable that no one 
can afford to miss seeing- her. In ev- 
ery intonation, every movement of her 
hands and self, every accent, she is the 
young Swedish girl whose sea-faring 
father had left her on a farm in the 
middle west believing her safe "from 
that old devil sea." But she has fallen 
anywhere but in safe hands and she 
hunts up her father hoping "to get a 
little rest." 

George Marion plays the father, as 
he did with Miss Lord in New York 
and London, the superstitious old sea- 
farer who has come down to the run- 
ning of a coal barge, whose standards 
and code of life are what would be ex- 
pected, but whose heart still cherishes 
the thought of his daughter. His vis- 
ion of her is that of a sweet young 
girl, safe on that inland farm. In the 
first act, when she hunts him up in the 
public house, and in her weakness and 
loneliness she chats with the woman 
who has shared her father's life on the 
barge. Miss Lord discloses herself as 
an actress who has reached the pinna- 
cle of her profession. 

Mildred Beverly, who plays the de- 
relict Anna meets in the grog shop, 
also originated the part in the play's 
Eastern successes and lends much to 
its success here. Thomas Chatterton. 
as the stoker, does the best acting of 
his career, but in the third act, when 
he comes on "cleaned up" he would 
look better the part if he wore a soft 
collar and some ill-fitting clothes to 
help dispel his matinee-idol appearance. 
Anna Christie is a great play in the 
hands of these players. It is an engros- 
sing story because it is life itself. 



Gripping Mystery Film at California 

"The Unknown Purple," starring 
Henry B. Walthall at the California, 
is a mystery play on the order of "The 
(rat and the Canary" and "The Bat." 
Surprisingly, it is as thrilling and mys- 



terious on the screen as it could be on 
the legitimate. In fact, the handling 
of the purple ray, the invention which 
enables the bearer to become invisible, 
and around which the plot is woven, is 
more convincingly handled on the 
screen than on the stage. 

The public at the California this 
week have the unusual opportunity of 
comparing effects. Henry Walthall, 
supported by Alice Lake, Ethel Grey 
Terry. Brinley Shaw, Stuart Holmes, 
Helen Ferguson and others, do two 
scenes in person taken from the movie. 
These are two of the tensest moments 
in the unravelling of the story. Wal- 
thall's voice has lost none of its re- 
sonant qualities in the years in which 
he has been acting for the screen. It 
is against the rules of the game to un- 
ravel a mystery plot for any future 
audience. 

One of the new Juvenile Comedies, 
enacted almost entirely by children, 
"Three Cheers," is well done and be- 
cause the stars are so young it is very 
amusing. Next week, the Paramount 
picture. "Flaming Barriers" with a real 
finest fire, will show at this theater. 
It is adapted from one of Byron Mor- 
gan's famous automobile stories and 
produced by George Melford. It prom- 
ises plenty of action and laughs, and 
boasts a long list of stars headed by 
Jacqueline Logan. Antonio Moreno 
and Walter Hiers. 



De Mille Production at the Granada 

"Don't Call It Love" is a story 
adapted from the novel, "Rita Covent- 
ry." De Mille has assembled a cast 
that has put life and interest into a 
plot not particularly suitable to the 




Wampas Week 

in San Francisco 
January 19^26 

Hotel Plaza warmly welcomes 
the Wampas crew and assures 
them of every comfort here dur- 
ing this week of gaiety. 



M O T E l_ 

LATi_ 

POST STREET AT STOCKTON 



P LATA 



Januarv 19, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



screen, Rita is a beautiful but poor 
opera singer, who makes love t<> ever) 
man she meets. Nita Naldi plays the 
title role, with Jack Holt in the male 
lead and fair Agnes Ayres as a foil to 
Xaldi's dark beauty. Theodore Kos- 
loff, Julia Faye and Rod La Roq are 
a few other notable in the cast. 

"Twenty Minutes in a Movie Studio" 
is an elaborate production with a large 
cast and a lot of original songs written 
around the Wampas and their frolic 
lure Mort Harris and Partington are 
the authors of the hit of the produc- 
tion, "Things arc not so good in Hol- 
lywood since the Movies Moved 
Away." Capacity crowds are filling the 
theater all week. 

"This Freedom" at Imperial 

"This Freedom" is a very human 
story of the present day and of inter- 
est to every thinking person of either 
sex. It has been most intelligently 
adapted to the screen, with Fay Comp- 
ton, the English actress in the leading 
role. She plays the part of Rosalie, the 
woman banker, who discovers only aft- 
er her children have met with failure 
in their lives, that a woman can not 
compete with man in the business 
world and successfully run a home and 
raise a family at the same time. 

The picture was filmed in England 
in the very locale of which it was writ- 
ten, and the photography is unusually 
fine. Dehison Clift, former San Fran- 
ciscan, filmed the story. A special mu- 
sical si ( ire arranged by Ormay and a 
comedy complete the Imperial pro- 
gram. "This Freedom" will undoubt- 
edly have as successful a run as did 
"If Winter Comes." 



King Dodo at the Casino 

One only had to look over the sea 
of smiling faces at the Casino the other 
night, to realize that as long as ferns 
Hartman is able to take the stage, he 
will always amuse and interest San 
Francisco theater goers. And he has 
surrounded himself with singers of a 
rare excellence. Harriet Bennett as 
"Piola" is the sweetest little "soldier 
of fortune" that we have ever met with, 
while her voice is apparently faultless. 
In addition, she has a charming per- 
sonality, and a lovely face and figure. 
In fact. Nature seems to have endowed 
her with more than her share of gifts. 

John Van as "Pedro" is as handsome 
as ever, and charms with his rich and 
satisfying tones, Dixie Blair as "Queen 
Lili." plays the part well, and has a 
pleasing voice. Altogether. Hartman 
and his company in "King Dodo" have 

been drawing appreciative and well 
pleased crowds. 



distributors to take in mind. It is never 
rushed to conclusions, the mannerisms 

ami the acting are all of them thought 
out to a nicety of detail. The actors 
and actresses arc all exceptional in 
tluir parts and the play itself is of ab- 
sorbing interest. It is not a sermon 
preaching thing but does bring to the 
onlooker a mighty good taste in the 
mouth. Scenically, and for effects, the 
"Judgment of the Storm" is one of the 
very best screen productions we have 
ever seen. The Strand management 
has shown itself very wise in the se- 
lection of its offerings in every direc- 
tion and the funny skit is really funny 
without being vulgar. The incidental 
music is very good. 



Western Songs at Hotel Richelieu 

An interesting young' woman, Miss 
Este'.le Phileo, has come to California 
from the wilds and the plains of the 
Cowboy country with a group of songs 
written while there. Songs full of the 
pioneer and western spirit; songs that 
are novel and bound to find favor not 
only west but east as well. Some of 
the songs were heard for the first time 
at a musical given in the ball room of 
Hotel Richelieu on the evening of Jan- 
uary 18th. 

Mrs. Elmer M. Woodbury, who has 
a well trained dramatic soprano voice 
and who is a native daughter of pioneer 
family, and Miss Ida Simpson, a con- 
tralto of personality and of the type 
best suited to give the proper inter- 
pretation of Miss Phileo's songs, ren- 
dered them in an interesting program 
last evening. 



The Strand 

"Judgment of the Storm" is a splen- 
didly cast and rendered screen play. It 
has a feature it would he well for other 



The Popular Symphony Concert 

I.ast Tuesday evening in the Civic 
Auditorium, I was present at one of 
the most enjoyable concerts of the sea- 
son. There were over 9000 people pres- 
ent, which increasing' numbers should 
gratify tile Fathers and strengthen 
them in their desire to bring good mu- 
sic before the people. The outstanding 
feature of the concert was Ethel l.eg- 
inska, a small lad) with bobbed hair 
and a dynamic personality. In the 
Hungarian Fantasy for piano and or- 
chestra by l.iszt she made an instan- 
taneous success ami held the audience 
from the first cadenza. Her individ- 
uality was so pronounced you could 
almost see the Sparks fly. Her second 
group was as follows: Polonaise in A 
of Chopin, Etude in E Opus 10 — Chop- 
in and the l.iszt I .a Campanella; all 
beautifully done and the Liszt number 
a veritable shower of fireworks. 

Alfred Hertz and the orchestra gave 
us fust the "Pathetique" of Tschaikow- 
sky and engulfed us with its lyric grief, 
barbaric coloring and impending fatal- 
ity. Conducted as if Hertz loved it. 
Then the ever lovely Andante Can- 
tabile Op. 11 for strings by Tschaikow- 
sky, ami Percy Grainger's "Molly on 



the Shore." Molly was no lady this 
time, too fast, for the Climax the ma- 
jestic Pom]) and Circumstance march 
of Edward Elgar with Uda Waldrop 
at the organ gave us a final boost with 
its great rythm as we said farewell to 
a great and glorious evening. 



The Ukranian National Chorus 

On Monday evening at the Scottish 
Rite Hall, The Ukranian Choir dem- 
onstrated a new school of choral sing- 
ing which should be an eye-opener to 
the American public. Coming so soon 
after the Sistine Choir was a daring- 
feat in itself, but their work is so dif- 
ferent that one cannot compare them 
except in the abstract. A veritable hu- 
man Symphony Orchestra, they gave 
us entrancing effects that no ordinary 
orchestra could give us, and with mar- 
velous basses that could sing lower 
than most of us think, the dynamic 
possibilities were tremendous. I have 
never heard humming so beautifully 
done and accents so clearly defined 
with not the slightest hesitancy in the 
smooth flow of music. 

Their songs were for the most part 
in Russian, but that did not mar their 
complete enjoyment. Diction perfect, 
remarkable agility and wonderful 
shading speak volumes for the careful 
wink of their conductor, Mr. Koshetz. 
Particularly interesting" were the 
American folksongs in the last group. 
Their soloist for the evening, Mile. 
Oda Slobodskaja, displayed a well 
trained dramatic soprano and was the 
recipient of several encores. May this 
wonderful choir visit us soon again 
and receive the homage due such a re- 
markable organization. 

MYNARD S. JONES, 

Arrillaga Musical College. 



Jos. Schwarz at Symphony 

The fourth popular concert of the 
San Francisco Symphony < Orchestra, 
under Municipal auspices, will take 
place on Tuesdaj evening, Feb. ?. at 
8:20, at the Exposition Auditorium, 
and Conductor Alfred Hertz has an- 
other interesting program in course of 
preparation. The guest artist for the 
sion, Chairman I. Emmet Hayden 
of the Auditorium Committee of the 
Board of Supervisors announces, will 
be Joseph Schwarz. the phenomenal 
baritone who created such a furore here 
on his first appearance as "Rigoletto" 
with the Chicago < >pera Company, two 
us ago. Two concerts each in 

Berlin and Vienna, appearances with 
the Paris < >pera ami fourteen perfor- 
mances with Mengeberg in Holland 
and Scandinavia last summer, all sold 
out. won for him from the European 
critics the title of "the greatest living 
baritone" and "one of the greatest liv- 
day." 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 19, 1924 




S. F. Auto Show 

The score or more San Francisco 
automobile distributors who during the 
past week have left for New York 
have as the principal object of their 
eastern trip the securing of the new 
models of their lines for display at the 
forthcoming automobile show, which 
will be held in the Exposition Audi- 
torium here from February 16th to 
23rd. 

All indications point to the fact that 
the coming display of motors, trucks 
and accessories will be the most in- 
teresting held in many years. Not only 
will there be an entirely new and mag- 
nificent decorative effect achieved by 
the wizardry of Geo. Wahlgreen, vet- 
eran show man, and his staff of arti- 
sans, but the displays themselves will 
be of more interest than in former 
years. 

New models never before seen on the 
coast will grace the exhibits of the lo- 



"New Year 
Blooms" 

Several delightful pic- 
tures showing some of 
San Francisco's New 
Year blooms make a 
charming page in next 
Sunday's Rotagravure 
section, which will be 
appreciated by all lovers 
of flowers, and that 
means everyone in Cali- 
fornia. Another timely 
page shows the Baby 
Stars of 1924 who will 
be in attendance at 

"The 
Wampas Ball " 

And also many other 
celebrities. "Over Two 
Seas' ' shows many 
prominent Europeans; 
"At the Capital" shows 
some of our prominent 
lawmakers; there are 
some "Novelties in 
Headdress" to please 
the ladies, some splen- 
did photos of Olympic 
Club members taking 
their New Year's dip, 
and, in fact, all the 
world's news in pic- 
tures in The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



cal motor men and the visits of these 
local dealers to the New York display 
mean that in many cases the same ex- 
hibits which are displayed there will 
be shipped west for the Pacific Auto- 
mobile Show here. 



The Vacuum Cup Tire 
Oiie of the most popular automobile 
tires is the Vacuum Cup Tire, which 
has a faculty for clinging to the road 
in the most skiddy weather, and is a 
great advantage to the driver of the 
automobile. In the Christmas Num- 
ber of the News Letter there was a 
typographical error in the name of the 
local Pacific Coast distributors, Tan- 
sey-Crowe Company, the printer mak- 
ing a mistake in the name "Tansey" 
which he had spelled "Tawsey." 

Mr. Tansey is one of the best known 
and liked tire dealers on the Avenue, 
and it is a pity that there should have 
been this mistake in his name. 



An inspection of the new Chrysler 
car now being exhibited by the Max- 
well Company discloses one of the 
main reasons why control of Maxwell 
has been and is being sought by other 
automobile companies. The prediction 
seems warranted that the new Chrys- 
ler car, which will supplant the Chal- 
mers model, will meet with a public 
reception that will force the Maxwell 
Company to turn out a minimum of 
40,000 of these new models for 1924. 
Automobile authorities agree that this 
latest Chrysler product is not only a 
tribute to the ability and foresight of 
the Maxwell management, but is des- 
tined to result in a marked enhance- 
ment of Maxwell earning power. As it 
has been designed with a view to eco- 
nomical quantity production. Maxwell 
class "A" stock continues in position 
for marked price appreciation. 



— "My dear," remarked the young 
husband, "did you ask the milkman 
why there is never any cream on our 
milk?" "Yes, darling, and he explained 
quite satisfactorily. I think that it is 
a great credit to him." "What did he 
say?" "That he always fills the jug so 
full there is no room for cream." 



Rebecca — What shall I charge for 
this coat? 

Abraham — Eighty dollars ! 

"But it only cost twelve!" 

"Very well. Announce that it is sold 
irrespective of cost." — Tyrihans 
(Christinia). 

ANNUAL MEETING OF THE JOSHUA 
HENDY IKON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the stockhold- 
ers of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works will be 
held at the office of the corporation, No. 75 
Fremont Street, San Francisco. California, on 
Tuesday, the 12th day of February, 1924, at the 
hour of 10 o'clock a. m., for the purpose of 
electing a Board of Directors to serve for the 
ensuing year, and the transaction of such other 
business as may come before the meeting. 
„„ CHAS. C. GARDNER. Secretary. 

Office, 75 Fremont Street. San Francisco, Cal. 



"Tillie, 1 understand that you were 
unable to work yesterday. What was 
it; acute indigestion?" 

"No; a cute traveling salesman." 



Gktf e Mtttqumb 

Adjoining- Columbia and Curran Theaters 
Geary and Mason. Phone Prospect 61 



% 


" "1 














tii! 


i 


^K£ 


ill 



Dinner and Cabaret Every Evening 

JACK HOLLAND AND HIS FAMOUS 

BEAUTY REVUE IN LATEST 

SONGS AND DANCES 

RADIANT COLORFUL COSTUMES 

HIGH GRADE ENTERTAINMENT 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation Is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 8418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SEBVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1349-51 Mission St., bet. nth and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 

Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
au elegant and durable manner. 

AVc call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 



Tel. Franklin 36155 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 
Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blackamltliiag 

II. W. Culver M. Daberer E. JoliDson 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



C. LALAXN'E 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

OLD POODLE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A $1.25 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m, 

to p. m. 

Also A I, a Carte 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most. Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

I'lione Kearny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner. Sundays and Holidays.. $1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 
'Half Dollar" Specials 

for the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street 



Golden Gate Restaurant 

2721 Hyde St. Phone Franklin 8500 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Afternoon Parties a Specialty 
Dance Italian Pinner 




CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



me ^ 

MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The Name PIONEER 



on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er it be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
u s c r i p t cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 

or stationer to .. „ _. ,,_. 

show you samples. ^^ _UVJ ; |1 : J JM JAJ ^ITlf 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1865 
41 First Street - - San Francisco 





N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



YOU CAN 




Are You 
Particular? 



4ur We offt "- 

Dining Car Service and Observation 
Cars With Speed and Comfort for your 
trip to Sacramento and the Sacramento 
Valley 

For further information call 

San Francisco — Telephone Garfield 64 

Oakland — Telephone Piedmont 345 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R 



rimnc Garfield S028 Palmer Graduate 

I [ours 1 to 1 and l 2 t<> 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

We-tprn States Life Building 
!,<>.-. Market sii-ppt Han Pranclnco 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. 18th and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 

and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rales, 85c per flny; $7 .50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service find Storage 

of Automobiles 



LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



IU* photographed this pear on your 
Birthday 




Bindlm in hII Principal Cities of California 



Onklii oil 
408 14th St. 



San Fru iici-i-ii 
41 Gran) are. 



duality 1866-56 Years--! 90 2 Quantity 

Oar Service Includes Following Places: 

l.tirllnt-ame Redwood City Menlo Park 

Sun Mateo Woodald* 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Frenel-ro Phone Market 9IS 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1480 

F.rnnomy Mar ability 



Halts PgMiaW l>T Hand. Only — 
-nil* < allrd for and DSat*«ras1 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parl-lan Oyelne; and Cleaning 
•SI Ma-nn St. Phone Franklin ZSI* 



Bonds and Mortgages Pay /J 

But— It's New Enterprises VJ 

That Make the Fortunes 





HE Industrial Giants of today were "little enterprises" yesterday. The 
Industrial Giants of tomorrow will be the small, little known con- 
cerns of today. Wise investors investigate NEW ENTERPRISES— 

they buy their way in before the cream is skimmed off. Frequently fortunes 

are made from comparatively small investments. 

How many products, or inventions, have appeared for the first time, during 
the last five years? How many "new things" have leaped into universal de- 
mand? Think over the list, and as you count them ask yourself how many 
investors have made fortunes through the sale and manufacture and financing 
of such products. 

A local corporation is about to finance such a product now. The experiment- 
ing has all been done, the uncertainty is past, manufacturing is under way * 
only capital is needed "to tell the world it's here." 

Cut Yourself a Piece of Cake 



Mail The Coupon 



McKAY MFG. CO., 

207 ALASKA-COMMERCIAL BLDG. 
San Francisco. 

Ploase send me, without obligation on my part, 
details of your new enterprise. 

NAME 

ADDRESS 

CITY state 



You can cut yourself a piece of cake 
and sit in — you'll be sure to want a 
slice of this. 

When you see the product, you will 
say, "Why in the world didn't I think 
of that?" And when you use the 
product yourself, you will say, "How 
did I ever get along without it?" And 
there you are. That's the kind of 
product we are putting out . . . that's 
the kind of product that leaps into 
"universal demand" — meets with 
"instantaneous success" and makes 
fortunes for sharp investors. That 
kind of a proposition is going to in- 
terest you. Suppose you write us to- 
day for the facts — then you can 
judge for yourself. Do it now, while 
you think of it. 



Kstablished July 20, 1856 

SAN FRANCISCO 







PRICE 10 CENTS - $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1924 



LOS ANGELES 




San Antonio Creek, Near Livermore, One of the Mam Nearby Spots 

Within 50 Miles of San Francis 



IWMBllTlgglHlliliE 






St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 
For particulars address 

SISTER SUP£RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Few People Take Proper Care of Their Teeth 

Some think that a rigorous brushing once 
or twice a day is taking very good care 
of them. Brushing is only a part of the 
process. Many things can happen to your 
teeth which only a competent dentist can 
take care of. Have your teeth examined. 
They may not be as sound as you imagine. 
A toothache means trouble ; do not wait 
for the ache. Watch yonr teeth and gums. 
There are gum troubles that will destroy 
teeth faster than decay. Are your teeth 
sore? Do your gums bleed? Call in today 
and talk it over. It will cost nothing. My 
nerve blocking system blocks off all nerves 
and pain. It will please you. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

Practice limited to 
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours 10 to 5 — By Appointment — 

Saturday 10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4662 

Removed to Suite 5S7 Liebes Bldg. 

177 POST STREET 

San Francisco 





ATTENTION 

BUSINESS MEN AND 

WOMEN 



Study Commercial Law 

The San Francisco Law School offers an intensive 
course in Commercial Law covering Contracts. 
Agency, Negotiable Instruments. Sales, Partner- 
ship and Corporations. Starting Monday, January 
28. Sixty hours. One hour on Mondays, Wednes- 
days and Fridays for twenty weeks. Class will meet 
at 5:15 p. m. Robert W. Harrison, Instructor. Busi- 
ness is becoming legalized in the sense of being or- 
ganized on a legal basis. This means that the fu- 
ture business man is to be brought more and more 
into contact with the law, and it will behoove him 
to make some knowledge of law part of his educa- 
tion. Also a course of forty hours in 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

Starting Tuesday. January 29. Alva Evans, Instruc- 
tor. Instruction will be given in the afternoon 
commencing at 5:30. 

Call or Write TODAY for Information 

San Francisco Law School 

Call Building 74 New Montgomery Street 

Telephone Kearny 4251 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

Wo will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

817-1S California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



The Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er it be typewrit- 
er paper or nian- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 
o r stationer 




show you samples, - jg ^ j ^ : | L J j . M JT] J : H 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1866 
41 First Street - - San Francisco 



OUR service in all phases of Auto 
Livery is backed by an adequate 
organization and over forty 
years of successful experience in busi- 
ness. 




Established 1868 
1G23-1C31 PINE STREET 



r.UblUh.d July 10. 1634 








TER 



Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. CIV. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1924 



No. 4 



THE SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, Russ Building. 235 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, 
Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, Calif., Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill. E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 : Canada, one year, $6.00. 

— Would you believe it ? There was an actual balance 
in the community chest. Finance and charitv join hands, 

Selah! 

* * * 

— In the days of old, before Prohibition was enfarced, 
could you imagine men and women (nice ones, too) stop- 
ping in the middle of a dance at a masquerade ball, to 
calmly tilt a whisky flask to their lips? 

— Mr. Grabski, Polish Minister, whose country has ac- 
cepted enormous loans from France, in the storm of bur- 
lesquing which the French wits have pelted his name with, 

is no doubt protesting that Shakespeare was all wrongski. 

* * * 

— Bank clearings put the city sixth in the country. That 
tells the story. It shows beyond any doubt that we are 
still the financial capital of the coast and going stronger 

than ever. 

* * * 

— A misprint in a paper made a headline read: "Films 
reveal garters of Mt. Lassen." Of course what was meant 
was "craters." But the films are always revealing garters 
and the connection was automatic with the headliner. 

— If Representative Upshaw carries out his threat to 
make it mandatory for all congressmen to take the pledge, 
the recording angel above will be worked overtime weed- 
ing out the mental reservations from nine-tenths of the 

oaths. 

* * * 

— A miller in a town in Pennsylvania had tried for years 
to repair a leak in his dam, but all his efforts were in vain. 
A colony of beavers, coming down the river, established 
themselves near his mill, and mended the dam in question 
so that it now docs not leak a drop. We suggest that 

I letch I letchv officials take notice. 

* * * 

—In the much talked of book, "Madame Claire," pub- 
lished last Summer, but still running strong, Madame Claire 
herself says: "Everyone's a failure at some time of their 
lives, The thing is to see that it isn't chronic." Ami again: 
"There arc a great main women, 1 find, who think that il 
they neither leave nor deceive their husbands, they are 

being good wives to them.'' 

* * * 

— Move than one prominent member of the American 

colon) m the Mexican capitol state- that, a hundred or even 
tifn years from now, that country would be a part of the 

United State-. \s staunch a foe of intervention as Mr. 
1 1. de Bekker, author of "The Plot Against Mexico." re- 
gretfully expresses the conviction that the absorption ><i 
Mexico b, the Unite. I State- i- onlj a matter of time. 



— The U. S. Senate is still considering the soldiers' bonus 
bill. Perhaps this question will be settled by the time we 
are plunged into another war. 

* * * 

— Every one who was ever brought into contact with 
William D. Shearer, late clerk of the District Court of Ap- 
peal for the Third District, will regret his passing'. He was 
the very soul of courtesy and had been connected with the 
court ever since 1905. 

— According to the state bureau of criminal identifica- 
tion, women criminals in California nearly doubled in num- 
ber last year. Perhaps a contributing cause for this is that 
justice is no longer blindfolded and a few old sightless, 
grouchy judges might materially improve the female mo- 
ral. 

* # * 

— We have just heard of a boy, not yet ten years old, 
whose habit it is to take a bottle of whisky to school with 
him daily, and who has tried to persuade other boys to 
drink it. This is only one of many such incidents. And 
still well-meaning but foolish old iadies and others, talk 
wisely (from their chimney corners) of the effect that the 
Volstead act will have upon the "rising- generation." 

— A propaganda investigating committee has demanded 
an explanation of the Edward W. l'.ok peace prize, of 
$50,000. Before Bok was haled up on his subject, we had 
a "hunch" that some foreign influence was back of this 
ex-editor, who awards $50.001 1 so nonchalantly to the per- 
son merely advocating the moth-eaten and fossilized League 

of Nations idea. 

* * * 

— For awhile we heard a great deal about the boulevard 
which was to have been built along the water front, out 
through the Presidio to the beach, etc. We were discuss- 
ing this last Sunday, crossing the bay and for the thou- 
sandth time noting how wonderfully Nature had dealt with 
our "good gra) city," which was a blue and gold city that 
morning in the warm January sunshine. "This should be 
one of the most beautiful cities in the world, and its water 
front, or front door, is dirty, unattractive; along the Marina 
it is positively revolting; what sort of city father- have we, 
who allow such condition- to exist, for more than nine 
years?" exploded one of our party indignantly. 

* * * 

— "1 believe love is the greatest force in the world," -aid 
John 1). Rockefeller. Jr.. at a meeting of some women's 
Bible clas> in New York recently. He stated that it was 
love which made effective his own work in adjusting the 
Colorado mine difficulties at the time of the Ludlow' mas- 
sacre. Even that hypocritical old Scotsman. Carnegie, 
newer went as far as that, relative to the "settling" of the 
Homestead strike, line would think the wisest plan for 
these plutocrats would be not to mention the past disa- 
greements of this sort; the American public ha- a short 
memory, and the jingle of the almighty dollar soon drown- 
out the wail of tragedy. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 26, 1024 




Of course our early history is so in- 
Our Mineral Output terwoven with the discovery and 

search for the precious metals, that 
we have always had a great interest in the mineral produc- 
tion of the state. But the precious metals were babies in 
their values to the mineral wealth which pours unceasing- 
ly from our fertile soil. We produced during the year last 
past $270,500,000, or very near it. of minerals, an increase 
of $25,0000,000 over the preceding year. Of course the great 
mass of this was petroleum, which shows nearly double the 
number of barrels of the year before. Next comes cement, 
which was worth $17,000,000; then crushed rock and gravel 
and fourth on the list, the gold, that brought people to the 
state, but which has now lost its place in the procession, 
and which must give way to more proletarian minerals. 
Even brick is ahead of copper, and copper of silver. Now 
we see what quantity production amounts to in the pres- 
ent style of wealth-making. The great aggregate of the 
minor eclipses the major, the bulk of the commonplace 
wipes out the distinguished. It is a sort of democracy of 
production analogous to the political democracy, which 
places the mob of Dicks, Toms and Harrys, to say noth- 
ing of Marys and Amies, over and above the more distin- 
guished and refined of their fellows. And really we cannot 
successfully criticize the process, for. after all, in the scale 
of things, petroleum is more useful than gold, and greater 
human values are dependent upon brick than upon silver. 
So let us all rejoice that we live in a state so rich in min- 
erals. 



It is hard and unpleasant to travel 
Colds in a Pullman just now. The whole country is suf- 
fering from an epidemic of colds and 
a night in a pullman is an infliction which is borne with 
difficulty. From all sides proceed the hideous noises which 
prove that the animal is uppermost, when catarrh and 
bronchitis stalk abroad. After all. there is something very 
uncivilized in our present fashion of travelling at night. It 
would seem as if the genius of our people, generally so 
marked in matters affecting personal comfort, might have 
been exercised in the production of a travelling sleeping- 
place, which would not grossly offend our sensibilities on 
the one hand, and on the other actually expose us to the 
risk of infection, at the hands of those affected with mili- 
tant microbes. It is too bad. also, that the sleep of adults 
should be disturbed by the ineffective wailings of infants, 
not their own. One has no complaint to make of the poor 
children ; surely they suffer an agony in the strangeness 
of their surroundings and their utter discomfort, but their 
pain is an aggravation to the rest of us. And then the beds 
are so seldom even decently comfortable or warm. In fact 
at present they are almost invariably so cold that one lies 
and shivers sleeplessly. driven crazy by the painful noises 
all about. No, the present form of sleeping car is not what 
it should be. Why should it be allowed to persist? 



Fifty thousand dollars for a prize is, 
The Bok Peace Plan to use a vulgarism, some money, but 

a good peace plan would be worth 
it. Is this a good peace plan? Alas, we should be glad to 
testify to its worth if we reasonably could, but it really is 
not. It is clever, much more clever than the casual reader 
will understand. It proposes that the United States shall 
come into the League without any strings and that the 
League shall give up Article Ten, which enables it to en- 



force its decrees by physical force and Article Sixteen which 
gives it the power to levy an economic boycott on recal- 
citrant and pugilistic nations. It might hold a small na- 
tion like Jugo Slavia. but no one else. But it would serve 
the purpose of enabling American financiers to invest in 
European securities under better conditions than prevail 
just now and, such being- the case, might actually cause a 
slight improvement in the European situation. All the 
same, it is an airy sort of construction which rocks per- 
iously under the winds of criticism. We cannot see the 
country accepting it. It will not satisfy the idealists who 
want peace, even to the extent of being ready to fight for 
it, and it will utterly displease the vulgar separationists 
and particularists of the Hearst and Johnson group. It 
smells of the study, and if anything is obnoxious to the 
American it is the obviously academic. Mr. Bok may put 
down his fiftv thousand to profit and loss. 



Our woman supervisor is 
A Supervisor Worth While worth a handful of men. She 

spoke her mind the other day 
to the crowd which jeered her stand on the power ques- 
tion, a crowd which had been undoubtedly urged on and 
set in motion by the machinations of the yellow press which 
will give no one other than its own favorites a chance to 
live in this community. We have called attention more than 
once to the condition of things in the city hall, and have 
repeatedly urged that its continuance cannot mean any- 
thing but disgrace to the state in the long run. When by- 
standers are allowed to express themselves unreservedly, 
and to hurl abusive epithets at the representatives of the 
community engaged in doing the work of the community 
which has elected them and honestly endeavoring to follow 
the dictates of their conscience, we come very near to vio- 
lence, which may very easily terminate some fine day, under 
sufficient excitement, in a lynching. We are indebted to a 
woman for the courage to stand up and declare her rights 
in the teeth of a howling mob, in the meeting of the super- 
visors, and we take this opportunity of congratulating not 
only her but ourselves, on the possession of her. The late 
tyranny of recalls and such appear to have taken all the 
starch out of most of our men. They go around on tiptoe 
afraid of that mob whose bark is after all so much worse 
than its bite, and they are afraid of having individuality 
and self assertion. It is a lamentable decline from the char- 
acter of our former representatives who would have faced 
death itself for their rights. 



There is no doubt that the conditions which 
The British confront the student of political life in Great 
Labor Party Britain are. at present, quite unusual. For 

the first time in the history of the British 
Empire, a part}' of labor will be in control of the govern- 
ment. What will lie the result of the experiment is nat- 
urally uppermost in the thoughts of the observer. 

It may be said freely that there will be in all probability 
very little noticeable difference, for some time, between the 
path pursued by the Labor I 'arty and that followed 1>\ it- 
more orthodox predecessors. All the British are imper- 
ialists, in the sense that they have faith in their empire 
and would maintain its existence at all hazards, so that 
we may expect very little deviation from the beaten path 
in that respect. On the other hand, it is not unlikely that 
so called inferior races in the empire may receive better 
treatment at the hands of the government, and that there 
may be a partial stop put to such discriminations as may 
have arisen from color differences and the like. 

On the continent, however, there will lie a marked change 
in the British attitude. There is no reason to doubt but. 
on the other hand, every reason to believe, that the recog- 
nition of Russia will be one of the first steps and this will 
be due as much to economic necessities as anything else 



January 26. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



and will ii"i show auv pro- Russian political leanings. I'm 
mi the French question there will undoubti a ven 

marked departure. There is little doubl that the masses 
of working people in England lav the present dullness ol 
trade and the great mass of unemployment at the door of 
the French movements in the Ruhr. We may expect there- 
fore a very pronounced policy in that respect. What the 
effect will lie on French politics is not easy to say. At 
present there is a very embittered feeling in France against 
the English and it would not take much to fan it into a 
flame. 'The franc settles down and down and does not re- 
cover. This must, if continued, lead to the inflation which 
has always followed persistent decline in the value of the 
money of a country. Inflation spells in the long run dis- 
aster and decay. French statesmen are as clever and well 
informed as any and will take steps to avoid the peril, and 
what the result will be on international relations is very 
doubtful. 

But it must be remembered that the Labor Party will 
only bold office by sufferance, because it does not possess 
enough votes to control and may be thrown out at any time. 
In fact this three party parliament with its opportunities 
for blocs is very full of evil possibilities and may render 
parliamentary government more and more difficult and 
perhaps pave the way for some modification of the par- 
liamentary system of which fascism is an example. 



Lenine is dead. Trotzky is in retirement. 
R. I. P. Lenine Lenine was a very strong man. Trotzky 

is a very strong man. These men, and 
their immediate followers, have imposed their wills upon 
Russia, and Russia is suffering today on account of this 
fact. Neither Lenine nor Trotzky. however, were strong 
enough and no men, or set of men, is strong enough to 
create something out of nothing. Russia today, to the out- 
side world, seems to be retrieving itself. This is a retrieve- 
merit only in so far as the capitalistic influence may be 
felt in Russia. Lenine and his so-called government of 
bloody tyranny has had, in many directions, to cater to 
those outside who had money to invest in certain conces- 
sions, and the Russians have bad to grant business con- 
cessions and protection such as is customarily granted in 
other countries to warrant the investment of foreign money 
in enterprises in Russia. Russian money is in almost as 
bad a way today as German money and in many other of 
the soviet ideas, when put to actual use, we find nothing 
but dire failures. What strong- men will take Lenine and 
Trotzky's places? Russia is now destined for very hard 
sledding 1 . 



Here we are again! It has been dc- 
Hetch Hetchy Bonds cided that the people be asked to 

make it possible to issue $24,000,000 
bonds, to be expended on the Hetch Hetchy. Presumably, 

the bulk of this money, when the bonds have been sold, 
will be expended in the building of the power plant, as 
well as on the general scheme of the I letch Hetchy water 
supply. 

Let it be understood that no one. having any knowledge 
of the situation, is adversely criticizing the work hitherto 
done, and being done, at I letch Hetchy. From an engineer- 
ing standpoint and from the standpoint of the builder this 
work is not oiilv stupendous but well done. When it comes 

to expenses which have been incurred, another question 

arises, and there may be necessary a certain amount of in- 
vestigating' later on. Indeed some feel that such an inves- 
tigation now is sure to come. 

It mav just as well be underst I. the people will not 

stand for any huge expenditure of money, in addition to 
the millions alreadv spent, until those having the building 
of I letch lletchv in charge have given an accounting of 



the amounts alreadv placed at their disposal. A large 
amount of curiosit) already exists as to the amount of 
San Francisco will eventuall) have at its disposal 
when the work, as to furnishing water, is completed. 

A- to the proposed hydro-electric plant, there is no doubt 

at all in the minds of (he people. They do not want a 
power plant and they can sec no object whatever in provid- 
ing the city with such a plant and if any of the bond money 
is to be used for this purpose, the people will certainly 
voice a very energetic protest. Enough money, it seems, 
lias alreadv been wasted anil it should not be necessary for 

the SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER to point to the 

people's opposition to the building of such a power plant 
to make the supervisors pause in their mad career. 



Gasoline a The price of gasoline is again beginning to 

Public Utility leap and there is little doubt that the own- 
ers of the supply will endeavor to recoup 
themselves for such loss as they may have had during the 
fall in prices. There is nothing to stop this. The owner 
of gasoline can charge as he likes for it, subject only to the 
play of competition. Competition is growing to be an ab- 
surdity in the gasoline industry, so that the purchaser will 
have to bear the burden. 

Rut gasoline has gone out of the realm of commodities 
subject to the law of supply and demand and of compe- 
tition. It is a public utility. The growth of the automobile 
industry and the vast numbers of people dependent upon 
the use of g'asoline has removed it from those commodities 
in which the free play of economic factors is permissible. 
It is no longer right that the owners of the gasoline stores 
should lie able to impose any price which appears conven- 
ient upon the people. 

When a commodity becomes a necessity of living and is 
inherently bound up with the life of the people, the gov- 
ernment is in the habit of calling such a commodity a "pub- 
lic utility" and imposing restrictions upon the price which 
can be charged for it. Everybody admits that water and 
light and transportation are matters of such public concern 
that the owners of water, gas, electricity and means of 
transportation cannot lie allowed to work their own sweet 
will and to tax the people for their profit. The government 
appoints a commission which regulates the price of water, 
gas. electricity and transportation. And everybody admits 
the justice of the attitude of the government and acknow- 
ledges the inherent justice of the rulings of the commis- 
sions. 

So, there should be a commission appointed by the state- 
to fix the price of gasoline and to concern itself with the 
interests of the people in the matter. This is reasonable 
and fair, for better or worse gasoline has become a prime 
necessity of life today, a public utility, and such being the 
case must be treated as such. 

Few people ever think of the magnitude of the industr) 
by which the modern automobiles an- kept moving. It is 
an industry which should lie watched carefully because 
of the opportunities which it presents for corruption and 
the like. The Fall case now horrifying the lovers of our 
government is a product of our present anarchy in the gaso- 
line business. Think of a business with an export trade of 
S75.O00.000 and with a domestic trade of four and half 
billion gallons being unregulated! And the life of till 
pie in a great measure now depends on this commodity. 

Government must regulate the price of gasoline. 



— We're coming to it: Philadelphia is employing an of- 
ficer of the United States' navy to put down liquor traffic; 
Atlanta. Georgia, is about to procure a I "nited States' army 
officer for the same purpose. If an officer, why not a regi- 
ment? Soon we'll all be chanting: "The Americans have 
come." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Amazing Frauds in Oil Stocks 

By J. M. SCANLAND 



January 26, 1924 



ACCORDING to a very recent government report about 
half of the oil companies in existence throughout the 
United States in 1922, were fraudulent. This estimate does 
not include the companies that were organized previously, 
some of which no doubt were in existence in 1922. This 
seems to be almost incredible, only for the fact that it is 
based on official investigations. The report further shows 
that the total capitalization of these companies amounts 
to four billion dollars. Of course large amounts of the 
good stock and the worthless shares remained unsold, but 
it is estimated that the people were defrauded out of one 
billion dollars during that year — perhaps more. Investiga- 
tions were difficult, as the swindling concerns refused to 
give details, and not only falsified their books but destroyed 
many. 

Basing their estimates on these figures, the officials be- 
lieve that the investigation for 1923 will show an increase 
in the number of fraudulent companies, and a corresponding 
increase in the sales of worthless stocks. From an unof- 
ficial estimate the swindles in 1923 will amount to one bil- 
lion and five hundred millon dollars. It is known that the 
frauds in California have increased in the year 1923 more 
than 50 per cent over those of the preceding year. 

In California nearly all of the oil companies are operated 
on the common law, or business trust plan, with a board 
of trustees. This system was introduced about the begin- 
ning of the "oil boom," three or four years ago, the change 
being brought about by a little sharp practice in the State 
legislature. About this time there was a rush of oil pro- 
moters from Texas and Oklahoma to Southern California. 
Oklahoma had been pumped nearly dry; that is, the wily 
promoters had nearly exhausted the field of victims and 
sought other green pastures. It was nearly the same con- 
dition in Texas. The promoters of fraudulent prospects 
prefer the trust and the unit plan to the original California 
plan of a company. They say that they cannot sell stock 
as well under the company plan. 

The Commissioner for the Southern District of California 
told me that they most always ask for a trust organization. 
The Commissioner is required to issue a permit, unless it 
has been shown that there is fraud. The trustees are ap- 
pointed by the promoters, who usually appoint themselves, 
or "dummies." Under this system the holders of the units 
of stock have no vote. But. under a corporation the direc- 
tors are chosen by a majority vote of the share-holders. 
This shows why the promoters prefer the trustee system, 
which enables them to elect themselves, and hold perpetual 
control. When the organization is classed as "speculative," 
the promoters are required by law to put eighty per cent 
of the sales of stock into a bank. They retain twenty per 
cent commission for selling the stock. If the concern blows 
up the share-holders receive the eighty per cent, thus los- 
ing only twenty per cent. That is, they are supposed to 
get it, but in most cases do not. And, strangely, under this 
system the trustees deposit the money to their own credit. 
The unit holders are not known to the bank. 

As indicated above the stock is sold in units of 100 shares 
at $1 each. The promoter gives his salesmen a "lead," to 
emphasize the point that there is no liability attached to 
this system as far as the buyer is concerned. This state- 
ment is boldly made in face of the fact that there is printed 
on the back of the receipt which this very salesman, is re- 
quired to give the buyer, these words of warning: 

"The liability of the holders of these shares for the pay- 
ment of indebtedness to be created and incurred by said 
trustees is a matter for judicial determination." 

This S. O. S. signal is printed in small type, and is al- 
most always overlooked by the buyer. 



The promoter also sings loudly of his permit ; that the 
company has the endorsement of the State Commissioner, 
and intimates that the permit is a guarantee of the solidity 
of the scheme and that the buyer is thus protected. He 
also instructs his salesmen to take up the refrain in their 
tents and block-houses at the wells, and also on the streets. 
This confusion of words is misleading, and false. On the 
permit, above the signature of Commissioner Daugherty, 
are the words : 

"The issuance of this certificate is permissive, only, and 
does not constitute a recommendation or endorsement of 
said securities." 

This warning is also overlooked by many unit buyers. 

Again. On the receipt which the salesmen are required 
to give to the buyer, are the words, in small type, over the 
signature of the Commissioner: 

"Prospective purchasers are hereby advised that the de- 
velopment of oil, and gas in commercial quantities, on the 
property herein above described, is purely speculative." 

Los Angeles and vicinity is the center of the industry, 
and of the fake promoters. Wells are bored everywhere 
and anywhere; shares issued, and salesmen sent out with 
bundles of highly colored lithographed paper, and the usual 
"lead," which is the line of talk they are to make to the 
intended victim. Each has his district. These salesmen are 
mostly men who have failed as school teachers, shyster 
lawyers, decayed show people, and an occasional preacher 
who has fallen from grace. They talk loudly of "geological 
formation," and a well now producing 5000 barrels a day 




romantic 
America, 

East 

and. there are 

• all year o 

excursions 

at reduced round trip 
rates to midcontinent 

and Atlantic Coastpoints 
Stopovers anywhere 
Fred Harvey meals 

-J°T details and reservations 

R. D. Johnson, Div. Puss. Agt., 601 Market Street, or 
Ferry Depot, Phone Sutter 7600 

lfllllllllflllllllll!lli!llll[!l!lllll!!ll!l!llllll!!l!ll[lli!l!!lllllili!l!!ll!» 



fanuary 26, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



which is only a short distance From this prospect. It is 
immediately over a "pool" of oil, and the well now going 
down is bound to strike it — can't miss it. This line of talk 
usually befuddles tin- brain of the average person, and he 
gives good money for worthless paper. 

The salesman also harps on the "declaration of trust com- 
pany," which is the safest and under this system the buyer 
cannot lose — if oil is found. The salesman also gives a false 
twist to the meaning of the words in the permit, leading 
the buyer to believe that the stock of the company is en- 
dorsed !>} the State Commissioner. Such is not the case. 
The Commissioner expressly states that the State does 
not endorse the trust company, but only gives it a permit, 
as stated above. The salesman is particular not to make this 
false statement in the presence of others, as it would prob- 
ably lead to his prosecution for misrepresentation. The 
promoter also takes care not to make such false represen- 
tations in his advertisements in the newspapers. 

It requires larger amounts of money to operate in the 
California oil fields than in Texas, or elsewhere. And. per- 
haps, there is more money lost there than in any other? 
In that State a company is usually capitalized at $200,000. 
each unit of stock being - $100. The promoter is allowed by 
the law to charge twenty per cent on the sales of units. 
He pays the salesmen ten per cent ; the other ten per cent 
is clear gain. In many instances, especially the fraudulent 
companies, the promoter is the "Company." He charges 
for selling his own stock. In addition to letting a contract 
for digging a well he can make a good profit on a lease. 
lie pays the alfalfa farmer $100 an acre for a lease on 100 
acres. He turns this in to the "company" at $1000 an acre. 
He pockets the difference. Even if he strikes oil, there is 
little left for the share-holders. The farmer knows nothing 
about the false figures in the lease, and if he should hear 
of the fraud and make a noise the promoter will tell him 
that it is none of his business. Then, perhaps, there is a 
"settlement" and nothing is heard except the wails of the 
share-holders. 

As an example of high finance and low dealings in the 
California oil fields, these cases may be quoted on the au- 
thority of the State Commissioners for Southern Califor- 
nia. A promoter organized five companies in an oil field 
near Cos .Angeles, and planned to sell units to the value 
of $500,000. The Commissioner learned that he had over- 
capitalized and he was stopped from further selling. How 
much he had sold before he was detected was not learned. 

Another promoter planned to sell under the rebate plan: 
That is. buying back shares at a reduced price. USUall) ex- 
changing other stock for them, lie would then re-sell these 
shares, and thus get a second commission. And still an- 
other promoter had planned to sell on a similar plan and 
had done a large business before being stopped by the Com- 
missioner, lie had capitalized his trust company for $300, 
001). and had sold about half of the shares. 

These men were indicted on criminal charges, and civil 
suits were also brought against them for misappropriation 
of funds. It is not likely, however, that the share-holders 
will recover, especially as one of the promoters fled to 

Mexico. 

< if all the promoters in this country none deserve "piti- 
less publicity" more than the oil stock swindlers. 




—The Communit) Chest people are going t,, make a 
campaign this year for $2,1 74, Cm.. That is a lot of money 
to expend in charity, in a prosperous community. Perhaps, 

it just seems a lot. and the amount would be expended 

anyhow. Bi pear strange that a private enter- 

prise like "organized charities" should ha\e the han- 
dling of Mich sums in the wealthiest place in the world. 
We have nothing to say against the people in charge who 
are the \er\ best, but we do doubt the system. 



FRATERNITY 

If 1 could write one little word 

Upon the hearts of men. 

I'd dip into the fount of love 

And write with golden pen 

One little word, and only one, 

And feel life's work on earth well done; 

And every heart would speak to me 

That one sweet word, "Fraternity." 

The angel throng would sing a song 

The sweetest ever heard, 

If they could read in human hearts 

That precious little word. 

For kindly thoughts and kindly deeds 

Are treasures more than crowns and creeds. 

In these the angel hosts would see 

The Children of Fraternity. 

And man will need no other creed 
To guide him on life's sea 
If he embark within the ark 
Of true Fraternity. 
For love divine will clasp his hand 
And lead him to the promised land. 
Love to his fellow man shall be 
His passport to eternity. 

— Lillian Irvine Pollock, in "American Poetry. 

HYMN TO LUCIFER 

Lucifer, Bright Prince of Sin, 
Teach me what ways to wander in 
That I may know the grim desire 
That stretches man across Hell's fire. 

Teach me thy mandates to rehearse, 
Teach me the sabbath witches' curse, 
Show me the cloaks thy sla\e> have worn 
To stand before Cod's throne in scorn. 

Teach me the mastery of hate. 

Of wickedness most intricate. 

Of passions blacker than black flames. 

Of darker crime- that bear no names. 

1 would know- you throughout all time. 

I'd earn a I >octorate of Crime 
Until, with sin quite understood, 

My heart might entertain the good. 

— fohn Farrar. in "Scribner's." 



DISILLUSION 

My childish dreams were filled 
With the lure of the city's light. 
With the thought of the city's laughter. 
With the shadowy gleam of night. 

Ami now midst the false light's glitter. 
Midst the laughter that quivers with pain. 
1 long for the wide open spaces 
And the freedom of childhood again. 

— Ava Fisher Salbador. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 26, 1924 



TownMLCRIER 




) WHO THE DEULA/fT THOU, 

'ONE THAT WILL PLUYTHE 
} pEVIL,SIR WITH YOU" 

Shakspeare* y 



— The appearance of the Ukrainia singers is a blow to 
our boasted civilization. These people are magnificent in 
physique and as handsome as nature allows a human be- 
ing to be. They are strong and beautiful, their clothes are 
modest and becoming, and their voices are simply superb. 
Where could we show such an aggregation ? Yet the 
Ukraine is a small country and we should say a very back- 
ward one. Some of our judgments of civilization need a 
revision quite badly. 



— The appointment of Judge H. Kerrigan to the Federal 
bench is the recognition of a jurist, who has passed suc- 
cessfully through every grade of promotion of the Califor- 
nia judge. He has practically spent his life on the bench, 
beginning with a justice of the peace position. We should 
say that it is the ideal way to get effective judges. At 
least Judge Kerrigan has proved that it is eminently sat- 
isfactory. 



— We are getting a whole lot of fraud in company mat- 
ters exposed. That does not mean that we are worse than 
formerly, but quite otherwise. It merely means that fraud 
is harder to get away with. All times of prosperity, when 
large sums are to be made, offer an insuperable temptation 
to many weak men. It does not reflect on the general in- 
tegrity of business men. 



— As the marionettes shown at the St. Francis were not 
for private gain but for a public benefit, we are within our 
habitual practice in saying that they were wonderfully pro- 
duced and a credit in even- way. The making and work- 
ing of marionettes satisfactorily is very difficult; more dif- 
ficult than you have an)' idea of. and the undertaking of 
a plav like the "Midsummer Night's Dream" through such 
an agencv. was almost an heroic feat. 



— There are quite a few of our local people who will be 
rejoiced to hear that the Irish are going to liquidate their 
bonds. All the bonds that were subscribed for the Sinn 
Fein Republic are to be liquidated by the Free State. That 
is what we are told, at least. In the meantime we are ready 
to sell our bonds cheap. Are there any bidders? 



— The Wampas business got a bit sickening. The papers 
did not seem to be able to do anything but work the changes 
on "stars" and constellations. Things like that give such 
a depressing effect of provincialism. Our society notices 
are poor enough in all conscience, but one would think 
that the jaded journalist might journal a bit more spright- 
ily on an occasion of that sort. 



— It was called the Artists Ball and the artists had noth- 
ing to do with it. It was the stockjobbers and the corpora- 
tion people that got all the notices. Not one artist was 
noticed, and their stunts went by almost contemptuously. 
Well, there is some sense after all in the matter. The stock- 
jobbers were real money, but the artists? How do we 
know? We have no judgment in matters of art. 



— The bar association is making desperate efforts to bring 
its team into line. There never was a harder bunch to or- 
ganize than the lawyers. They would drive a labor o: 



ganizer crazy! They seem to be born 



-,'il i 



Can it be 



that they are as a class afraid to have their conduct sub- 
mitted to discipline? 



— When, a few days ago, Henri La Fontaine, president 
of the Belgium senate, said America owes Belgium $88,- 
000,000,000— for saving America in the great conflict, he 
settled definitely the mooted question : "Who won the 
war?" But. honors come high and a little "urge" from Un- 
cle Sam to Belgique to pay ITS debt might emphasize for 
the little fellow the realization of how "uneasy lies the 
head that wears a crown." 



— Now. there is a pretty pother about the power matter 
and Hetch-Hetchy. The sensational press is publishing 
lists of supervisors that they don't like, very much as they 
used to draw up lists of suspects in the French Revolu- 
tion, and they are calling for the political guillotine. This 
is all nonsense and there is no reason to believe that the 
accused have not acted in good faith. 



— The problem of congestion in the federal courts is to be 
met according to suggestion by increasing the powers of 
the commissioners. Dear me. there is a dreadful lack of 
originality in the proposal. Everything is to be cured by 
the increase of the power of governmental commissioners. 
We shall soon be the most official ridden people in the 
world. 



— Building is increasing steadily not only here, but on 
the whole Pacific Coast. Here is our best bet for the pres- 
ent. There may be doubts about prosperity in general, 
though we don't see why; but there can be no doubt at all 
about the development of the industry and the settlement 
of the coast. Secure in that fact, the storms outside may 
whistle by us in vain. 



— Dr. F. W. D'Evelyn is to take a prominent part in the 
canary show. This shows how time softens. The doctor in 
his time was one of the most redoubtable of British fighters 
and lost a leg in the first Boer war. Now he loves birds 
and children best. So. we may smile, but that is really suc- 
cessful living. It is the path trodden by great men. 



— The ladies are voting like winking for the Bok Plan. 
They must think that it has something to do with the Lad- 
ies Home Journal and they are cutting- out the voting form 
like a favorite pattern. There is a hint for politicians. Get 
the platform up like a dressmaking design and the dears 
will fall for it. And their vote will carry most things now- 
adays. 



— It is asserted the anti-Japanese land act will have the 
effect of raising the cost of certain commodities presently 
produced by these orientals because of the lack of white 
labor. Might those accommodating "community chests" 
have the effect of keeping, in our cities, a large portion of 
this urgently needed "white help"? 



— Rome may finally canonize an American saint: Gen- 
eral Smedley Butler, Philadelphia's director of public safe- 
ty, recently declared before 2200 policemen in the Metro- 
politan Opera House he had been offered a bribe of $100.- 
000 — but spurned it! Several of the policemen swooned. 



— Stefnnssoii savs that he will have no more exploring 
in his The dirigible and the wireless have taken the joy 
«Mit of it. There is something in what he savs. Many ex- 
plorers have merely taken their trips to escape from the 
human pressure of civilization. It would seem that that 
respite is now denied. Hence, why travel? 



— How do I know that we arc really puritans? It is 
very easy. When you go to a show and see people sitting 
on each others knees, it is a show of puritans. It represents 
the height of devilmant at a Sunday School picnic. 



Tanuary 26, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




ii/qVe^ou 

HEtfRDIT 1 ? 



— Gerald had just bought a car. and he was taking the 
girl of his heart for a spin. 

Proud of being able to turn a corner without seriously 
damaging the hedges, he was letting the car out a bit. Up 
hill and down dale they tore at a gallant pace. 

"I )h, Gerald, isn't it lovely?" said the girl, as they topped 
a hill and beheld the country spread far out below them. 

I bit she got no answer, for they were already dashing 
downwards like the stick of a rocket. Gerald, with a moist 
forehead and bulging eyes, shouted in her ear: — 

"The brakes have given way !" 

"( Ih, Gerald, how awful !" shrieked the girl. "Can't you 
stop it? J'd give all the money in the world to get out!" 

"Don't part with a penny!" gasped Gerald, who was of 
Scottish descent. "We'll both get out for nothing when the 
car hits that gate down there !" 

— Johnson was the proud father of a track star in a 
negro college. One time during the track season he went 
to witness his son perform and upon his return to his lit- 
tle hamlet he was questioned as to the merits of the ath- 
letes, by the deacon. 

"Does you say they has hot races down there?" queried 
the reverend personage. 

Johnson looked at his inquirer for a moment before he 
spoke. 

"Hot races?" he said. "Why man, they run their races 
in 'heats.' An' after they was all through 1 walked down 
an' took a look at the track an' Lawd, they'd burned it to 
cinders. Tha's how hot the races was." 
* * * 

— The bus conductor had difficulty in keeping himself 
supplied with small change. Many persons who patronized 
his car handed him currency in payment of their fares. 

He managed to get along fairly well until a woman, car- 
rying a tiny infant, boarded his car. 

When he approached the woman for her fare she handed 
him a dollar bill, 

"Is that the smallest you have, madam?" he asked, fear- 
ing another run upon his change. 

The woman looked at the conductor and then at the baby. 
and replied: 'Acs. You see. ['have been married onlj 
twelve months." 

— A certain schoolboy who had regular!) brought home 
excellent w eckh reports at the beginning of last term, just 
as regularly returned with unsatisfactory reports towards 
the end. 

"Mow is it you are not doing so well?" asked his father, 
anxiously. 

"It's teacher's fault." was the reply, "lie's moved the 
boy that sat next to me." 

* * * 

— Binks had driven into a "female foursome" which was 
looking for ,i lost ball. As soon as his ball had come to 
rest on the fairwa) the lad) who had lost hers imnie- 
diately spotted it and prepared to swing. 

"Beg youi pardon," shouted Binks, "but isn't that my 
ball ?" 

The lad) looked back disdainfull) and again prepared t<> 
sw ing. 

"Hey," he cried running up to her. that's my ball you're 
shooting !" 

She looked up icily. "I should think." she said, "thai in- 



stead of interrupting my shot you would at least attempt 
to find my ball — after I'd found yours!" 
* * * 

— After effecting an entrance into the bank, the burglar 
found his wax to the strong-room. When the light from 
his lantern fell on the door he saw the sign : — 

"Save your dynamite. The safe is not locked. Turn the 
knob and open." 

For a moment he ruminated. "Anyhow, there's no harm 
in trying it, if it really is open." lie grasped the knob and 
turned it. 

Instantly the office was flooded with light, an alarm bell 
rang loudly, an electric shock rendered him helpless, while 
a panel in the wall opened and out rushed a bulldog which 
seized him. 

An hour later, when the cell door closed on him. he- 
sighed : "I know what's wrong with me. I'm too trusting. 
I have too much faith in human nature." 



It is necessary, it seems, that some one raise a cry 
Spitting about any of the ordinary law breaking taking- 
place before those, who have the guarding- of 
our safety and our health, take notice and cause offenders 
to observe the statutes, provided to prevent the commission 
of minor crimes. 

Several years ago the offense of promiscuously spitting 
on the sidewalks was so great that it affected the sanitary- 
condition of the people. Spitting in public places and on the 
sidewalks was so popular that it became necessary to ar- 
rest a number of people and to inflict fines upon them to 
make others stop the increasing indulgence in the same 
dirty practice. 

We are back again, almost, to the same position and the 
spitter is becoming more numerous with every day which 
passes. It is high time action was taken by the Board of 
Health and the Police Department. Let us have a sample 
lot of spitters arrested and punished. It is not safe to as- 
sume that the spitter is limited to the masculine sex. In a 
walk, up Market street, we counted cptite as many women 
who spat as men. Let them be arrested, no matter what 
the sex, and let us have fines assessed on the spitter, until 
he or she stops the expectoration habit. 



— Edna Purviance says: "Some day I'll meet the right 
man (for purposes of marriage) but I haven't met him." 
In her environment this would seem a matter of easy ac- 
complishment — especially among the short-term contract 
bovs. 



Elgin Sedan 

For Sale 



Newly painted and re-conditioned. Upholstery and 
car in fine order. Gruss Air Springs. Extra tire. 
A splendid closed car. 



A Bargain 

REO USED CAR DEPT. 

Van Ness and Geary 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



Tanuary 26. 1924 




By ANTISTHENES 

— Do "sermons" on petting parties in turn engender 
them? The young are curious and inhibition begets inquisi- 

tii in. 

* * * 

— The interallied military control commission recently 
met with a cool reception in Berlin; among other indig- 
nities they were snowballed by pedestrians. 

— The marshall of Glouster, Ohio, will lie given 25 per 
cent of all prohibition fines. Does that entail the bootleg- 
gers' boosting the "buy-off" 25? 

— Another news item that recently took up valuable paper 
space announced the resignation of the Chinese cabinet. 
However we weren't inflicted with names. 

— Extra! News item: The Prince of Wales travelled to 
Paris as an ordinary passenger! — My word, but the bally 
lad's humility is approaching nigh unto degradation. 

* * * 

— Mitcha, Polish bandit, makes income tax returns to his 
government on the proceeds of his varied robberies. Some 
Americans engaged in far more respectable enterprises than 
banditry might betimes emulate even a bandit. 

* * * 

— Speaking of the high cost of news print paper reminds 
us how a saving of dailies' space could be made by dis- 
continuing further notices of changes in Prince Regent 

Togi Hirchita's wedding date. 

* * * 

— The Society of Gideon, engaged in planting bibles in 
hotels, reports a famine in the sacred word. Quite a crop 
of these holy books may be gathered in China. India and 
Africa where aborigines are reported to use quantities of 

them for practical purposes other than mentionable. 

* * * 

— Association of Machinists criticizes Senator Johnson 
for differing; with the President's allowing munitions to lie 
sold to Mexican Federals. The machinist makes a living 
fabricating instruments to kill humans and the rebels down 

there can't effectively protest — so, the machinists win. 

* * * 

— San Francisco church bulletin of subjects for recent 
Sunday "sermons": "Who is to blame for petting parties?" 
"How old are you?" "Hornets and angels." "Are young: 



women less moral than they were a generation ago?" 
is scarcely mentioned nowadays — even in the hymns. 



Jesus 



— Were Jesus to come, a stranger, to San Francisco seek- 
ing a Christian church would these excerpts from news- 
paper advertisements of recent Sunday "sermons" guide 
Him to one: "Spooning in the light of the moon," "Police 
and petting parties." "Adolescent sons and daughters," 
"Community chests." "Keeping on tup" and "From now 
on"? 

* # # 

— "More than 8000 boys and girls of high school age 
abandon school in San Francisco each vear," the Part Time 
Educational Conference declares. Dr. E. A. Lee explained 
these children are "old in mind." That's it; with the super- 
fluity of items, extraneous to education, in our present day 
school curriculum these "old in mind" lads and lassies logi- 
cally deem it better "schooling" to be out of school. 



PROBING A CHAPERON 

A person by the name of Jack Giller or Oakes is pester- 
ing Miss Belle Bennett, actress, to own up her wifeship 
unto him and this the lady refuses to do — in fact she in- 
tends to importune the district attorney to injunct Jack 
from striving to carry out his husbandhood. All of which 
reveals a queer situation. 

It seems Jack and Belle some time ago made a written 
contract to really tie the martial knot — in the regular way 
— after "five years of observation" ! Now, with a large por- 
tion of wedded ones, "five years of observation" suffices to 
untie the tightest tie ever knotted; Miss Bennett inclines 
to such unloosing; Jack opines otherwise; hence his follow- 
ing her around. 

But the seemingly inexplicable : Jack says he's Belle's 
husband; most husbands know when they are — in cases, 
the realization is acute, so it is not of record where ever 
before a man claimed the relationship and was mistaken. 
However, Belle reports: "I never lived under the same roof 
with him — except with a chaperon." The last clause is the 
kevstone in the edifice of alibi — and — well, no doubt a jury 
may, later on. be enlightened on the intricate motivatings 
of a "chaperon" — what she is. what not. when, her omni- 
presence, the quality of her sense of observation, her gulli- 
bleness, her attitude of liberality and all essences com- 
pounded into a chaperon who IS a chaperon. On this hangs 
the case of Jack — the single, or, the benedict. 



MURDERED OR MARTYRED? 

There is evolution in missionarying. When, some days 
ago, Chinese bandits — "converted" or "unconverted," we 
know not — abducted or killed several missionaries, engaged 
in preening - for heaven these earthly celestials, the world 
was quickly appealed to for assistance in ferreting out the 
executioners, and, if of the "converted." speeding, prema- 
turely, their passage into the paradise they had been taught 
to yearn for. Incidentally, in this contemplated enforced 
translation of them into beatitude, no heed was to be taken 
of their desire in the premises nor of how they might fare 
on attaining to the threshold of glory — sans preparation 
and sans attrition. But. so much for the neophytes; in 
reference to those who suffered by the brigands' attack 
we cannot help noting the changed status of present day 
missionarying. When Navier was stoned in Japan, Pere 
Marquette tortured in the valley of the Mississippi, Paul 
beheaded outside the gates of Rome — even Jesus crucified 
on Golgotha — we find no chronicling of their appeal to 
"home governments'' for retaliation ; contrariwise, these holy 
men seemed rather to have yearned for the opportunity to 
yield their lives in proof of the faith within them. True, 
in the present instance, wives and children of the ministers 
were concerned, but. in the holy bonk they expounded, this 
is writ: "Who takes up the sword shall perish by the 
sword." and. may not this connote: "Who earn their living 
by the gospel must be willing to suffer for the gospel"? 

So, while regretting on humanitarian grounds this latest 
Chinese outrage, we cannot help pondering over the seem- 
ing passing of pristine fervor, in that martyrdom is pres- 
ently referred to as homicide and soldiers are now dis- 
patched to slay barbarians, where, instead, in centuries 
past, when their comrades in faith had been slain, other 
bands of zealots went forth, unarmed, to conquer fur God, 
or, being conquered, to rejoice in attaining the immortals' 
crown. 



— It cost the school department of Berkeley $63.15 for 
each pupil enrolled last term. If the lads and lassies over 
there enjoyed the same portion of vacation, half-days, gvm 
exercises, military training, class shows and abbreviated 
school hours our youth had over here, but $31,575 of thai 
amount could rightly be charged to readin', ritin' and 'nth- 
metic. 



January 26, L924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




By KEM 

"Many times the reading of a book has made the fu- 
ture of a man." — Emerson. 

ALL who visited the National Arts Club in New York 
from November 7th to December 5th were invited to 
vote on the ten best books among the year's output. The 
compiler of the list most closely approximating the aggre- 
gate judgment of all the voters, was awarded a prize con- 
sisting of die books chosen by the winner. More than ten 
were mentioned, but the following are the ones most in 
demand at the libraries at the present time: 

A Son At the Front, by Edith Wharton. 

A Lost Lady, by Willa Gather. 

Life and Letters of Walter H. Page, by Burton Hend- 
ricks. 

The Conquest of Fear, by Basil King-. 

His Children's Children, by Arthur Train. 

West of the Water Tower, by Homer Croy. 

The Dance of Life, by Havelock Ellis. 

The Enchanted April, by Elizabeth. 

The Able McLaughlins, by Margaret Wilson. 

Lummux, by Fannie Hurst. 

The Mind in the Making, by James Harvey Robinson. 



THE COAST OF FOLLY, by Coningsby Dawson, is 
one of the outstanding Spring books. It comes in an at- 
tractive jacket — picturing the henna-headed heroine who 
dared skirt the "Coast of Folly." It is the story of a mod- 
ern New York girl who slipped into a summer flirtation 
with a young married man. She was an heiress, and in 
the author's words : 

"Though she would not have owned it. she suffered from 
the disease of the age; she was afraid of marriage. Thanks 
to the new social frankness, she knew too much, and most 
of it inaccurately. She was convinced of the slaveries which 
can be wrought by matrimony, but of the emancipations 
she was skeptical. She was the victim of the latest hy- 
pocrisy, which affects to regard the inequalities of the 
sex as prehistoric; yet there were times when, feeling 
bruised and jostled, she would' willingly have claimed 
mercy on the score of inequality." So to while away tedium 
>he plays with a dangerous situation. 

Everything that the average romantic young reader de- 
mands is to be found in the Coast of Folly, viz.. luxurious 
living, palatial homes, quantities of pretty clothes, modern 
love-making and scenrs in which the wispiest of bathing 
costumes and the last word in motor cars prominently fig- 
ure; but beside these necessities for a modern best seller, 
some well developed bones are to be found instead of jusl 
flabb) ll, h, There is an antidote in this book for the poison 
in much of the late literature, for here is to be found prog- 
ress of character, not retrogression, and the moving chap- 
ter on "The Beginning of the Fight" is an inspiration. We 
rejoice to find in this that nearl\ every one is born brave 
— what people lack i~ "tin- opportunity that calls forth 
courage . . that the secret of all heroism is discovering 
something worth being brave for . . . and that courage is 
the most conquering of all virtues . . . and the most tri- 
umphant person the quitter who reforms, and goes back to 
the light." So here in this book we have a young girl tak- 
lintv. unaccustomed steps along this rugged path of 
courageous high living under the guidance of a writer — 



who was never a "quitter" either in the late war or in the 
present literary one for decent, interesting fiction. 

( !i ismopolitan, $2. 



PLANS FOR MARKET STREET LINE PURCHASE 

The committee which Mayor Rolph appointed to submit 
plans for the purchase by the city of the Market Steet Rail- 
way, has at last, after a year of silence, bestirred itself and 
whatever conclusions it has arrived at, will be made pub- 
lic "within a few days." It appears that the members have 
been so taken up with the problem of Hetch Hetchy that 
they have been deaf, dumb and blind to the exigencies of 
the transportation problem in San Francisco. 

Mayor Rolph is greatly interested in the proposed pur- 
chase and heartily recommends it, providing the price can 
be paid out of the earnings of the Company, and as the peo- 
ple themselves voted in favor of this purchase plan, there 
seems to be no excuse for not arriving at a decision at once. 



N. W. AYER & SON IN SAN FRANCISCO 

The largest advertising ag'ency in the United States is 
opening offices in the Matson Bldg. This is N. W. Ayer 
& Son, of New York, Boston, Chicago, Cleveland and Pitts- 
burg, who were established in Philadelphia in 1869, where 
their home office is still located. G. H. Thornley of this 
firm has been in this city for the past month, and will be 
in charge of the office. 

H Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained g] 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

gj AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

| 239 Post Street San Francisco | 

HBSHS@BBHSSSB®S®HBSSBHBBHHBSBS@®@BE@®EBHHHBBEB 




MARY HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



Luncheon is served from 1 1 : 30 to 2 : 30, 

J*t and tea from 3 to 5 

fv 

'*>!£?£>* 334 SU1TER STREET Douglas 7118 



"The Ijargost Fire Insurance 
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LIBERAL CONTRACTS REASONABLE RATES 



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only 



IMPORTED FABRICS 
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Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Ma nu fact urers of 
RIVETED STEEI, TITE, TANKS. ( II.VERTS, FLUMES, 
PENSTOCKS. GASHOLDERS. SMOKE STACKS. ETC. 
San Francisco, Calif. I, on Angelea, Calif. 

444 Market St. fill 7 Santa Fe At«. 



Mayerle Glasses' 

Relieve Eye Strain 




Scientific Eye Examination 
-9 Years' Practice in San FrancN 



960 Market St. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 26, 1924 




BUSY CUPID 

MR AND MRS. WILLIAM HENRY DAVENPORT announced the 
betrothal o£ their daughter, Miss Dorothy Davenport, to Wil- 
liam Hammonds Edmands of Upper Lake, son of William 
Otis Edmands. The engagement of Mr. Edmands Sr. to Mrs. 
Atherton Macondray was also announced. The wedding will 
be an event of the early spring. The young couple will go 
to Lake County to make their home, a residence now being 
under construction for them. 

REV. CHARLES CHRISTENSEN and Mrs. Christensen of Novate 
announce the engagement of their daughter, Miss Sarah 
Christensen, to William A. Brewer Jr., son of Rev. William 
Brewer and Mrs. Brewer of Burlingame. The wedding will 
take place in the late spring and the young people will make 
their home in Sacramento, where Brewer is engaged in busi- 
ness. 

MISS FRANCES PRINGLE and Mr. George McDonald's engage- 
ment is announced. The wedding will be an event of the 
spring. Miss Pringle is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward J. Pringle, both of whom come from well known Cali- 
fornia families. Miss Pringle was Miss Miriam Moore, a very 
popular society girl, who has developed her talent for paint- 
ing and has exhibited some of her work. Miss Pringle is the 
granddaughter of Mrs. Edward J. Pringle Sr. and a niece 
of Miss Cornelia Pringle, Mr. Sidney and Mr. Covington Prin- 
gle, and of Mrs. Thomas Breeze. She made her debut in so- 
ciety during the winter of 1921 and '22 after being educated 
in the East and Europe. Mr. McDonald is a young Scotch- 
man who, with his brother, Mr. James McDonald, came here 
to live from Glasgow two years ago, and is the son of Mrs. 
John Parker of Glasgow. 

MISS MARION WALLACE GIBBS and Mr. William Alston Bourn 
Hayne's marriage took place on Thursday in Pasadena. 

MISS AVERY RANSOME and Mr. William Grant will be mar- 
ried in April. Miss Ransome will be one of several girls in 
the younger set who will become brides in that month. 

MRS. ATHERTON MACONDRAY and William Otis Edmands 
have announced their engagement. The marriage will take 
place early in the spring. Mrs. Macondray is a daughter of 
the late Mr. and Mrs. William B. Collier. The Colliers and 
Athertons are families for decades identified with society. 
Mrs. Herman Phelger, Miss Inez Macondray and Ensign 
Atherton Macondray are the children of Mrs. Macondray. The 
latter is also a sister of Mrs. R. P. Macdonald, Mrs. Bergie 
B. Beckett and Misses Sara and Dorothy Collier and William 
B. Collier, the latter of Washington, D. C. Mr. Edmands, 
who is a graduate of Harvard, is engaged in ranching in Lake 
County. 

MISS LEONORE FITZGIBBON and Brook Mohun announced 
their engagement this week, the news being one of the pleas- 
ant surprises of the late season. The marriage, which will 
take place in the spring, will unite two prominent pioneer 
families. Miss Fitzgibbon is a daughter of Mrs. Gerold Fitz- 
gibbon and of the late Dr. Fitzgibbon, for many years a 
prominent physician in this city. She is a sister of Mrs. Wil- 
liam Hogan of Boston, and of Mrs. Ralph Heger, Miss Eliza- 
beth Fitzgibbon and of Maurice Fitzgibbon. Mr. Mohun is 
a son of Dr. and Mrs. Charles C. Mohun and a graduate of 
Georgetown University, D. C. 

MISS APITA HILDEBRECHT and Frederick Lichtenberg, both 
members of well-known old families here, are telling of their 
betrothal by cards. Miss Hildebrecht is a daughter of Mrs. 
Therese Mersereau and of Charles Hildebrecht of this city. 
She is a granddaughter of the late Patrick Swift, a well- 
known business man of this city a few decades ago. Mr. 
Lichtenberg is also of pioneer ancestry, his grandparents 
having been the late Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Frederick. Mr. 
Frederick was one of the leading business men of this city, 
head of the Frederick furniture linn. Mr. Lichtenberg is a 
son of the late Edward Lichtenberg. For years they main- 
tained a hospitable home in San Rafael. The kin includes 
the Ziel, the Lichtenberg and Du Bois families of San Rafael. 
LUNCHEONS 
MISS ISABELLE BISHOP, a debutante of this season, was the 
guest of honor when Mrs. Horace D. Pillsbury was hostess 
Tuesday at a handsome luncheon party that brought together 
the coterie of pretty girls who have been so much the lite 
of many affairs of this season. 



MRS. DEAN DILLMAN will give a luncheon party on Monday, 
January 2 8, in honor of Miss Lucy Hanchett, who is to be 
married to Vincent K. Butler next month. 

MRS. FIN LUND gave a musicale Tuesday night at her home in 
Vallejo street. She is going abroad in March and is giving 
several parties before she leaves. Thursday Mrs. Lund gave 
a luncheon. She is the wife of the Danish consul here. 

MRS. WILLIAM KENT entertained at luncheon last Friday com- 
plimenting Mrs. James Thatcher, who is visiting in San Fran- 
cisco from the Atlantic Coast. Mrs. Thatcher is the mother 
of Mr. Thomas Anthony Thatcher, whose engagement to Miss 
Harriet Pomeroy was recently announced. 

MR. AND MRS. E. A. MUESSDORFFER were the guests of honor 
at an informal luncheon at which Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. 
Crocker entertained Wednesday afternoon. As Miss Mary 
Freer of Belvedere, the young matron was a great favorite 
here, and Wednesday's party brought together a congenial 
group of old friends who formerly resided on the island. 

MISS LUCY HANCHETT, who will become the bride of Mr. Vin- 
cent K. Butler Jr. on February 23, will be the complimented 
guest at a luncheon at which Mrs. Dean Dillman will en- 
tertain next Monday afternoon, January 2S. The party will 
be held at the Town and Country Club. Miss Hanchett was 
the principal guest at a luncheon given Thursday by Miss 
Frances Corbet at the San Francisco Golf and Country Club. 

MISS MARIAN FITZHUGH will entertain at luncheon on Tues- 
day, January 2 9. The guests of honor will be Miss Gertrude 
Banks, who has just announced her engagement to Mr. Wil- 
liam Shaw, and Miss Mary Gorgas, the fiancee of Lieutenant 
Matthias Gardner, U. S. N. 

MR. AND MRS. S. F. B. MORSE and Mr. and Mrs. Raymond 
Welch were chatting with friends at luncheon at the St. 
Francis Monday. Mrs. H. M. A. Miller entertained a few 
friends including Mrs. R. J. Hanna and Mrs. E. F. Preston. 
Another group of debutantes included Miss Caroline Madison, 
Miss Merrill Jones and Misses Florence and Marie Welch. 
TEAS 

MISS HELEN HOUSE was the guest of honor at a tea which 
Miss Patience Winchester gave at the Town and Country 
Club Tuesday, many of the guests at the Pillsbury party 
earlier in the day prolonging their stay at the club by join- 
ing Miss Winchester's party. 

MRS. HERBERT O'BRIEN entertained informally at tea a few 
days ago at her residence in Clay street. 

MRS. GEORGE STANLE1GH ARNOLD and the two daughters- 
in-law, Mrs. William Kent Jr. and Mrs. Thomas Kent, were 
joint hostesses at a delightful tea Wednesday afternoon at 
the home of Mrs. William Kent in Kentfleld. The party was 
given in honor of Mrs. Gregory Jones, who has recently 
moved to Ross, where she will reside permanently. 

OF INTEREST IS THE NEWS that Miss Margaret Krsak will 
act as chairman of the Nations participation in the Wild Flow- 
er Pageant Tea to be given at the Palace Hotel April 24, by 
the California Spring Blossom and Wild Flower Association. 
Miss Krsak is well versed in Pageantry and recently directed 
and was responsible for the wonderful Pageant of Nations 
given at the Auditorium on July 4th in honor of the N. E. A. 
and World's Conference. Miss Krsak's acquaintance amongst 
the diplomatic circles is extensive and no one is better fitted 
to take charge of the Nations participation in the coming 
pageant. A Californian, she is always interested in anything 
given to further and benefit the State. The work done in 
tree and wild flower planting by the California Spring Blos- 
som and Wild Flower Association especially appeals to Miss 
Krsak, who is one of the board of directors. 

DINNERS 

MISS HARRIET POMEROY and Thomas A. Thatcher, whose en- 
gagement was recently announced, will be the guests of honor 
at a dinner party to be given by Miss Alice Griffith on Feb- 
ruary 6. 

MISS FRANCIS PRINGLE will entertain at dinner on Tuesday 
evening, January 29. The affair will be in compliment to 
Miss Margery Davis and will be held at the Pringle residence 
in Franklin street. 

MR. AND MRS. FRANK DEASY were hosts at a buffet supper 
party at their home recently. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Sun Frnneisco 
Telephone Sutter 3660 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



January 26, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



COLONEL AND MRS. WILLIAM MORROW have issued Invita- 
tions for a dinner at their borne al Alcatraz next Wednesday 
evening, later attending the dance al the Officers' Club at 
Alcatraz with their guests. 

miss [SABELLE bishop will be the guesl of honor al a dinner 
party to be given this Saturday, with Mr. and Mrs. Charles 
F. Jackson and Miss Dorcas Jackson as hosts. Later the 
guests will attend the Spreckeis ball at the Burlingame Conn- 
try Club. 

MR. and MRS. Frederick W. BRADLEV recently entertained 

at a large dinner at their home in Pacific avenue [or Mr. 
and Mrs. William Wallace Mein, who have recently taken 
possession of their new home at Divisadero and Broadway, 
which was formerly the home of the late .Mis. Berthe L 
Welch. 

MR. AND MRS. .JOHN A. LANDERS were hosts at a family din- 
ner Sunday evening, the occasion being the former's 84th 
birthday. The party was held at their home in Octavia street 
and was attended by their children, grandchildren and their 
great-grandchildren. On January 31 Mr. and Mrs. Landers 
will celebrate the 5 7th anniversary of their marriage at a 
quiet home function at which they will receive the congratu- 
lations and good wishes of their relatives and closer friends. 

MR. AND MRS. JEROME POLITZER have asked some of their 
friends to be guests at a dinner they are haying this Saturday. 

BRIDGE 

MISS KATHERINE MACKALL, the bride-elect of Mr. William 
Elie Jason, entertained at a small bridge party Tuesday aft- 
ernoon at her home in Jackson street in honor of Miss Agnes 
Weston, whose engagement to Mr. John Hamblin Threlkeld 
was announced in the early fall. 

DANCKS 

MISS IDALEB DAVIS, the sub-debutante daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard Davis, gave a large dinner dance on Friday 
evening before the Junior Frolics in the red room of the Hotel 
Fairmont. 

MISS MARIE AND FLORENCE WELCH, who were formally 
presented to society at a brilliant ball given by their parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch, at their home down the penin- 
sula the early part of the season, will be hostesses at a dance 
February 1. The affair will be held at the Welch home in 
Broadway. 

MR. AND MRS. RUDOLPH SPRECKELS will give a ball at the 
Burlingame Country Club this Saturday evening, to introduce 
their debutante daughter, Miss Claudine Spreckeis, to so- 
ciety. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

MR. AND MRS. BART THANE, who have been staying at Stan- 
ford Court for several months, have moved to Berkeley, 
where they have taken a. house for the remainder of the year. 
Their daughter. Miss Juliette Thane, is attending the Univers- 
ity of California, and the change of residence has been made 
on her account. 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR GEISSLER have gone to Chicago, 
where they have taken an apartment for the rest of the win- 
ter season. They came to San Francisco from their home in 
New York in the early winter and were the house guests 
of Mrs. Geissler's brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. 
Duval Moore, until a lew days ago. 

MRS. CLEMENT TOBIN arrived from New York on Monday and 
is visiting Mrs. Harry Hill at her home on Broadway and 
Webster street. 

MRS. CHARLES McCORMICK and Mrs. William S. Porter ar- 
rived here Monday from New York and Europe, where they 
spent several months, and on the same train was .Mr. Charles 
N. Black, who has been in New York on business. 

MRS. WHITELAW REID and her brother, Mr. Ogden Mills, 
have arrived from New York and are at their estate at Mil- 
brae. 

MR. JOSEPH 1). REDDING left [as! week lor the Easl. and is 
now en route to Paris, where he will join Mrs. Redding for 

the late winter and early spring. 
MRS. JAMES GUILFOIL and her two children will leave Satur- 
das ior i, os Angeles, where they will spend several weeks 
wiih her pareiits, Mr. and Mrs. Dario Orena, 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Ness Ave., at Geary Street 



SAN" FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



F.I.MEK M. WOOnniKY Mannrer 



MRS. GERTRUDE ATHERTON lefl tor the East Sundaj by way 

•■'■w Orleans. She will spend the spring in New fork, 

where her granddaughter, Mrs. Philip Hum, and Mr, Hum 

are IfVil 
MR AND MRS. EDWARD BRIGHT BRUCE have arrived in 
Santa Barbara Crom New York and are visiting her mother, 

Mrs, Sherman Stow. They will remain with Mrs. Slow until 

April when they will sail for Italy, where they will reside 
indefinitely. 

MR. AXIi MRS. JAMES I!. HOWELL and their sons. Master 
thoraton and Master James Howell Jr.. lefi Saturday for 
Los Angeles, where they will spend several weeks. Thej 
were accompanied on the trip smith by Mrs. Howell's step- 
father and mother, Major and Mrs. Phillip Cray Wales. 

MRS. E. H. Ci. SLATER of Washington, n. c. who has often 
visiled here and in Burlingame, has arrived to remain for 
an indefinite time. She is a guest, at the Hotel St. Francis 
Mrs. Slater was a guest at the William II. Crocker home 
the last time she was here. 

MR. MAYO NEWHALL Sr. has gone to Santa Barbara, where 
he spends several weeks every winter. He is staying at El 
Mirasol. 

MRS. DANIEL LOTHROP of Boston is spending the winter in 
San Francisco and is a guest at the Hotel Canterbury. She 
will return in the late spring to the Atlantic Coast, where 
she will open her country place, which was formerly the prop- 
erty of Nathaniel Hawthorne. 

INTIMATIONS 

MRS. GEORGE BOYD and her daughter, Miss Jean Boyd, will 
leave in February for a trip abroad and will be away for 
several months. Mrs. Boyd's younger daughter, Miss Cynthia 
Boyd, who is attending school at Catonville, will graduate in 
the late spring and will join her mother and sister on their 
European travels. 

MISS MARIE WELCH will accompany her mother, Mrs. Andrew 
Welch, to Europe in April. 

MRS. HARRISON DIBBLEE and her daughter, Miss Betsy Dib- 
blee, are going abroad next month for an extended sojourn. 

MR. RICHARD LEE will arrive from Alaska next week for a 
week or ten days' visit with his mother and sisters, Mrs. 
Erba W. Lee and Miss Rosamonde Lee and Miss Margaret 
Lee at the Somerset apartments in Pine street. Mr. Lee is 
on his way to Peru, where he will be connected with the 
Guggenheim interests. 

DR. AND MRS. DOHRMANN PISCHEL will leave the first of 
March for the Atlantic Coast and will sail on March 15 for 
Europe where they will remain indefinitely. 

MR. AND MRS. EDMUNDS LYMAN will leave in March for Eu- 
rope and will travel for several months. 

MAJOR AND MRS. CHARLES GILMAN NORRIS, who have been 
spending the winter abroad with their young son and nephew, 
Mr. Frank Norris and Mr. Joseph Thompson Jr., will return 
to the United States April 1. 

.\IRS. HARRY H. SCOTT will leave during the week for Chi- 
cago, where she will visit her sister, Mrs. Robert Dunham. 



COLOR COMPLEXES 

The "fear" of color seems a common complex, according to 
B. Northcott Helph in his study series on the "Vital Relation- 
ships of Color" being presented Monday evenings in the (lallerie 
des Beaux Aits, 11G Maiden Lane, and which is the natural ex- 
pression of human mind. Indeed, with color as with other things, 
frank familiarity breeds confidence as well as the traditional con- 
tempt. As with the nettle, a little touch of color stings, whilst a 
firm hold gives no injury. The conviction thai comes with cour- 
age, and the courage that comes from conviction, is the purpose 
of Mr. Helph in these individualized presentations. 



STR.\M> THEATER 

The Dempsey-Gibbons 16 round fight is the feature which is 
drawing crowds at the Strand Ibis week. The picture is one 
thrill after another and there is plenty of action up to the last 
reel. Although it is against the law to import fight films into 
California, these pictures were nevertheless smuggled into the 
State. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Mnke Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Batter 81S0 



t*nder Management CARL 3. STANLET 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 26, 1924 






IJHNANCIAy 

By P. N. BERINGER 

THE Pacific Gas and Electric reports show a phenomenal 
increase in business for 1923, and there is no doubt that 
the number of subscribers for gas and electricity will go 
on increasing for 1924. The reason for the increase in busi- 
ness is due to the fact that the management has always 
been an en'ightenecl one and that it has striven to meet the 
requirements of the people in the territories served. San 
Francisco, instead of attacking such a corporation by at- 
tempting to curtail its business locally, through furnish- 
ing power in competition, should encourage the corporation 
officers in every way possible. Here we have the largest 
electric light and power producing plant in the world, a 
plant giving satisfaction everywhere, and yet we find some 
people so possessed of animosity that they would like to 
see such a plant crippled. It is almost unbelievable that 
such a thing may be so. If this great corporation were one 
that laid terrible burdens upon its employes, if it were one 
that asked for. or had obtained, rights out of all propor- 
tion to the benefits conferred, if, at any time, the service- 
rendered were such as to anger the people being served, 
through unreliability or because of lack of constancy and 
strength, there might be an excuse for the position taken 
by a few discontented people. These people have not the 
bulk of the population, users of electricity for power and 
light and consumers of gas, behind them. 

Your Income Tax Return 

I wish to impress the business man, professional man, 
and the farmer, with the fact that, regardless of whether 
your net income was in excess of $5000 you will be required 
to use Form 1040. The smaller form, 1040A, is used for 
reporting net incomes of $5000 or less. All items of gross 
income must be reported. Gross income usually consists 
of gross profits on sales, together with income from other 
sources. The return must show the gross sales, purchases, 
and costs of goods sold. The professional man must in- 
clude all fees and compensations for professional services. 
This applies to dentists, doctors, and lawyers. The farmer 
must report, as gross income, the proceeds of sales or ex- 
change of product raised on the farm and the profit on 
sales of products bought by him and resold. 
* * * 

The Shipping Industry 

It may confidentially be expected that the business of 
shipping will go on improving for the year 1 () 24. More and 
more ships will be commissioned, and this will be on ac- 
count of the fact that our export and import trade is sure 
to improve. Under the most adverse of conditions, the 



business did improve in 1923. In 1<»24 we will see the 
building, in this country's yards, of many motor ships and 
it is more than likely that a great many of the vessels, now 
laid up in our creeks, and belonging to Uncle Sam. will 
be sold t" private parties and transformed into motor ves- 
sels. The motor vessel is no longer an experiment and the 
ship builder is now convinced that motor vessels will even- 
tually displace the steam driven craft. 

* * * 

Export and Import 

Trade with foreign countries is improving, and it has 
been improving all through the year 1923. This improve- 
ment has been had ("although all sorts of conditions, such, 
as the war abroad and also because of the apathy of the 
American business man) largely controlled the situation. 
The wars will not continue. Germany will finally pay her 
debts, and war conditions in Europe will come to an end. 
Mexico will have peace in a very short time. China must 
compose her difficulties and give the merchandisers of the 
world a chance at trade in the interior of the country. 

* * * 

Banking in California 

The banking of a state or a city and the volume of the 
financial transactions made possible through the banks, is 
a sure index to that state or city's prosperity. San Fran- 
cisco, today, has its clearances totaling $S.049.5S3.000 for 
1923, and it is a safe prognostic to saj that this will lie far 
outstripped in 1924. 

* * * 

Chamber of Commerce 

The project to build a vast exposition building on the 
Marina which is the conception of those who stand a- of- 
ficials of the Chamber of Commerce, should meet with the 
hearty approval of all citizens. Another building project of 
the same officials is the erection of a superb office building 
to house the Chamber of Commerce and other commercial 
or industrial organizations. These two buildings, it is be- 
lieved, will soon see a beginning of operations. They are 
part of a comprehensive and constructive program for San 
Francisco, backed by the brains and the money of Chamber 
members. 

* * * 

The Commonwealth Club 

The Commonwealth Club has been dubbed a collection 
of "highbrows" b\ one of the local newspapers. This name 
was tagged on the members in connection with an editorial 
on the subject of the State budget system and the result of 
having the budget adopted. The burden of the editorial 
was as to paying solicitors for soliciting signatures to pe- 
titions. I feel that the "highbrow" appelation as applied 
to the members of the Commonwealth Club is altogether 
misplaced unless it is that the editorial writer meant to 
imply that there are entirely too many bald heads in the 
aforesaid membership. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 




Are You 
Particular? 



Dining Car Service and Observation 
Cars With Speed and Comfort for your 
trip to Sacramento and the Sacramento 
Valley. 

For further information call 

San Francisco — Telephone Garfield 64 

Oakland — Telephone Piedmont 345 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R. 

The Scenic Route 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1349-51 Mission St., bet. 9th and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 
Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 



January 26, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



SecoND speeDS 



The Auto Show 

With the national automobile show 
at New York a matter of automotive 
history the leaders in the industry now 
are turning their attention to San Fran- 
cisco and the Pacific Automobile Show, 
February 16 to 23, at the Exposition 
Auditorium. 

< >f course at the present time the 
Chicago exposition is creating' consid- 
erable interest, nevertheless executives 
of the various motor car factories re- 
gard the San Francisco Show as one 
of the most important trade events in 
the country. The verdict of Pacific- 
Coast motor car enthusiasts is awaited 
with interest by manufacturers in New 
York, Detroit, Toledo, Lansing and 
many other eastern cities. As a result 
indications point to the San Francisco 
show being- the most interesting ex- 
hibit ever seen in the West. Manager 
W'ahlgreen is unusually optimistic, de- 
claring it will easily outstrip anything 
yet held, owing to the fact that scores 
of new models of many concerns will 
be seen on the Coast for the first time. 

"The new type semi-sport closed 
model for two, three and four passen- 
gers will probably take Northern Cali- 
fornia by storm, just as it has New 
York," said Wahlgrecn. "I can also 
assure the public that several new cars 
will be seen in San Francisco during 
show week that were never here be- 
fore." 



Many Innovations at the Auto Show 

Air cleaners — Some cars have added 
this device, so as to help reduce carbon 
deposits, unexploded gasoline usually 
collecting on dust particles sucked in 
at the intake valve. Franklin, Case, 
Chrysler and a few other makes are 
utilizing air cleaners. 

Springs — ( )ne manufacturer h a s 
placed the springs parallel with the 
axel, instead of above it. claiming the 
new wax gives greater "road stability," 
and lessens side sway. 

Colors — Sober, but rich, hues domi- 
nate, although several sports models 
are resplendent in bright color--. 

Clutches New forms of clutches 
have come in, while existing types on 
other cars have been improved to give 
greater smoothness in operation. 

Frames — This part of the auto's 
backbone has been strengthened in 
main cases, the frame being made of 
heavier steel or given more cross mem- 
bers so as to prevent twisting. 
Types of Wheels 

Wheels — Twenty-six models of cars 
have disc wheel-, seventy-six use wood 
wheels only, and nine are equipped 
with wire wheels. 



Carburetor; Changes have been 
very slight. 

Spark control — More car- are being 
equipped with an automatic or semi- 
automatic ad\ ance or retardation in the 
ignition. ( )ne car has no spark lever. 

Lighting— -One car is equipped with 

a device which regulates I lie lights by 
a twist of the horn button in the top 
of the steering wheel. 

Engine valves — A survej shews that 
two-thirds of the cars have the L head 
type of engines, while some 22 per cent 
have the overhead valves and the rest 
have sleeve valves. Adherents of the 
overhead valve claim it gives greater 
power per cubic inch of piston displace- 
ment and is less likely to develop 
"knocking." 



The Marmon Automobile 
Marmon is in the strongest financial 
condition in many years. The present 
Marmon car is unquestionably the fin- 
est ever produced. It was introduced 
in 1914 and the company has concen- 
trated on the same chassis design for 
nine years. This car has been reduced 
in price $400 and now has a base price 
of $2785. 

Marmon has all the elements of suc- 
cess and a real fighting front. It must 
be reckoned with as a factor of rapidly 
increasing importance in the motor car 
business. 



The New Chrysler 
An erroneous impression has gone 
abroad to the effect that the new 
Chrysler Automobile, which is being 
made by the Maxwell Automobile 
Company, will replace the Chalmers 
automobile. The Chrysler car will not 
take the place of the Chalmers, the lat- 
ter having built up a popularity which 
it will continue to hold, and it is being 
manufactured as heretofore. 



President of California State Automo- 
bile Association 
William T. Sesnon, prominent San 
Francisco banker and civic leader, is 
the new president of the California 
State Automobile Association. He was 
selected to lead the Automobile Club's 
activities for 1924 at the annual elec- 
tion of the board of directors held in 
the Palace Hotel in San Francisco 
January 19th. 



Facts Concerning the Rickenbacker 

Company 
The combined experience of the seven 
men who constitute the executive 
heads of the Rickenbacker Motor Com- 
pany is 140 \ cars. 

None of them has been in the busi- 
less than IS years. B. F. Everitt. 
the President and General Manager, is 
one of the five original pioneers of the 
industry. His experience dates from 
1901. 



This 146 years of experience has 

been divided about equally among the 
seven major branches of automobile 
manufacture— engineering, production, 

purchasing-, body building, sales and 
advertising-. 



The New Rollin Automobile 

The new Rollin, which is proving to 
be one of the outstanding motor car 
sensations of the last ten years, is the 
first automobile in the world to have 
European type motor — 4-wheel brakes 
and balloon tires. Many makers, in an 
attempt to provide a greater factor of 
safety and more comfort for motorists 
are inclined to choose between 4-wheel 
brakes and balloon tires. In other 
words, they are either going to adopt 
one or the other. But the Rollin man- 
ufacturers took the broader course, and 
in order to be sure that the public 
would receive both the greatest factor 
of safety ever invented, plus the great- 
est comfort providing invention, they 
have incorporated in the Rollin both 
4-wheel brakes and balloon tires — a 
combination found on no other car. 



"Community 
Chest 

of San Francisco" is the 
title of a graphic page in 
next Sunday's Rotagra- 
vure Section — showing 
in appealing pictures the 
many ways in which 
your donation helps to 
make life more bearable 
for some of this city's 
unfortunates. There is 
a decidedly attractive 
page portraying 

"London's 
Beauty Chorus" 

and showing some of 
the British charmers 
who have started their 
conquest of New York, 
but none of them com- 
P i i- e wit b Chicago's 
"Folly" which adorns 
the first page. "In the 
Week's News" shows a 
score of prominent 
Americans; "Around the 
World" gives the latest 
world's news in pic- 
tures, and there are 
some thrilling pictures 
of the police strike in 
Melbourne. Don't miss 
The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 26, 1924 



Pleasure's W^nd 




OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURES 

_ Torn Moor>e. 



A critic has two functions. One is 
to speak of the merit of a play accord- 
ing to price charged; the other is to 
review with — yes, we'll say it, although 
the phrase is misused to triteness — 
"constructive criticism." It is difficult 
for a reviewer to find fault and tell it 
to his readers when he believes the)' 
have seen or will see their money's 
worth, because a negative often sounds 
worse in print. True, there are cheats 
that should be chased off the boards, 
but generally speaking a critic analy- 
ses, or should do so ; he means what 
he says and no more. 

If one knows, and someone must pre- 
sume to know, he should keep up the 
standard of taste as far as possible with 
his knowledge. Sometimes he gives 
up, as. without mentioning any names, 
witness the case of the critic in New 
York when a play was so bad in his 
estimation, and the best intelligence 
agree with him on this, that he admits 
he tried to kill it for one year. Then 
there was nothing left to speak of it 
but in praise. There you are! he suc- 
ceeded in this somewhat, for he re- 
ceived indignant letters from readers, 
lie made amends by offering to refund 
the price of tickets to all who had their 
evening spoilt on his advice. That's 
what he got for backing down. 

NATHANIAL ANDERSON. 



The Ukrainian National Choir 

On last Sunday afternoon, in the 
Civic Auditorium, the Ukrainian Na- 
tional Choir gave an extra performance 
in accordance with public demand. In 
spite of the poor publicity and short 
notice there were at least 4000 people 
present who enthusiastically cheered 
this wonderful organization. 

In this larg-e space some of their 
finer work is lost, but their ensemble 
and dynamic possibilities were still in 
evidence. 

Their first number "Our Lady of 
Potchaiv" gripped the audience with 
its odd intervals and long' drawn ca- 
dences. Alexander Koshetz' composi- 
tions "There was a Widow" and "The 
Voting Monk" were very interesting. 
I should like to have known the young 
monk, he was such a gay fellow. "On 
The Mountain" gave us some remark- 
able sforzando effects. 

Then came Ewssei Beloussoff. whom 
I consider one of the greatest living 
'cellists. A beautiful tone and crisp 
technic make over trite things till they 
seem like new. 



Mile. Oda Slobodskaja was heard to 
much better advantage in the Audi- 
torium than in Scottish Rite Hall, and 
I enjoyed particularly her aria from 
Aida. She was the recipient of several 
encores among which was Eli, Eli ! 
which seems to be a great favorite with 
the public. 

How few of us know the beauties 
and possibilities of our own American 
folk-songs until we hear them so beau- 
tifully done by a foreign chorus! List- 
ening to the "Lambs," "Old Folks at 
Home," and "Susanna," they each took 
mi a new meaning for me that after- 
noon. 

Wm. H. (Doc) Leahy has done 
something for the public of San Fran- 
cisco in engaging this wonderful 
chorus to open the New Tivoli on 
Thursday evening. January 31st, for 
four days, with a matinee on Sunday 
afternoon. Do not miss an opportun- 
ity to hear them. 

It is not necessary to understand a 
word of what they sing, for they have 
made music a really universal language 
am! can say so much more in tone than 
we can say in words that there is es- 
tablished a bond between them and 
the listener that is so beautiful that 
we can only compare it witli the thrill 
that comes once in a lifetime. 

MYNARD S. J( )NES, 
Arrillaga Musical College. 



Orpheum 

Speaking of hits, Herman Timberg 
figuratively scores a home run at the 
< Irpheum this week. 

Herman, assisted by his brother 
Sam, presents the cleverest line of 
chatter and foolishness that Orpheum 
patrons have seen for many a week: 
He wears the conventional brown der- 
by ol the Hebrew comedian and a pair 
of glasses rivaling Harold Lloyd's. Hut 
his joshes and style of presenting them 
are original and he was without doubt 
the mainstay of the program'. 

Benny Leonard, assisted by the Tim- 
bergs, leads the show on the billboards 
and. with the help of Herman Tim- 
berg, almost does likewise on the 
stage. Benny is a good actor for a prize 
lighter and a bout between the cham- 
pion and Herman was the funniest fea- 
ture of the act. Needless to say who 
received the decision. 

Lee Duncan and his famous German 
police dog actor, Rin-Tin-Tin. made 
their vaudeville debut this week. Rin- 
Tin-Tin is a remarkable animal and 



does some clever tricks. The act was 
short, and we thought that it was to,, 
much so to demonstrate Rin-Tin-Tin's 
versatility. 

Paul Morton and Naomi Glass in a 
skit "April" were only fair. Both of 
the "showers" were too dry for any 
time of the year. Margaret Young, 
phonograph artist, was good and her 
excellent impersonation of a chorus 
girl extracting a $2000 fur coat from 
her sweetie, almost made one wonder 
from what source she received the "lo- 
cal color." 

The "Midnight Sons," Kane and 
Merman, had a good line of jokes and 
were well received. Raymond Pagan 
and his dance orchestra was not as 
good as some we have heard at the 
Orpheum. They had the mistaken idea 
that the public prefers novel interpre- 
tations to good melodic popular music. 



Casino 

Fun in its most graceful spirit was 
in vogue at the revival of "Wang" last 
Sunday night. 

Ferris Hartman's splendid light op- 
era company at the Casino Theater is 
giving the best one-dollar value in the 
show line at present in San Francisco. 
This means more: these tuneful and 
well-acted operas, with graceful 
choruses singing prettily, good-looking 
women as principals warbling lovely 
songs, fine male voices, make the Hart- 
man-Steindorff engagement well worth 
while to those in the habit of paying 
more for inferior quality entertainment. 

Mr. Hartman at no time loses the 
gay spirit required for his kind of 
work; Harriot Bennett, Lavinia Winn 
and Ha/el Wilson all have charm and 
keep in the atmosphere, while Dixie 
I '.'air in a more matronly role also 
keeps well in the delightful touch so 
enjoyed in light opera. Miss Blair 
brings into play her training from the 
Speaking stage. So does Frank Ellis, 
and John Van's voice is always good 
to hear. He looked well as a lieutenant 
of the French garrison at Siam. Here 
, r there, perhaps, a younger member 
ol the cast would show a weakness. 
which he will overcome in time. Paul 
Steindorff steps into the pit of the or- 
chestra with the old idea very much 
alive of bringing forth a melodious 
evening, and from the time the curtain 
goes up the audience is swung through 
the life of gay airs, witty lines and 
songs and commendable acting for a 
play of the magnitude of "Wang." 



Jascha Heifetz 

Truly great is the genius who can 
sway the emotions from the depths of 
despair to the heights of ecstasy. This 
is what Jascha Heifetz did with a 
crowd that filled every seat at the Tiv- 
oli Theater Wednesday. His program, 
well balanced ami was free from hack- 



January 26, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



neyed niiinbers, was followed note b) 
note l>\ the audience who clamored for 
more. 

Nardini Concerto in C. Minor, 
showed the complete artistry of the 
violinist as well as his supurb crafts- 
manship as a master technician, lie is 
almost perfect in his rendition. I lis 
tone is exquisite and rich in emotional 
quality. 

Heifetz was generous in his encores. 
His suave charm was not that of the 
boy whom we heard here on his last 
tour, lie is no longer a lad but a ma- 
ture artist. 

While having complete mastery of 
his instrument, Heifetz suggests a cold 
reserve feeling which makes one wish 
that he would throw off his perfect 
control and paint in glowing' colors 
the passion of his temperament. 



California 

"Flaming Barriers" at the California 
this week, directed by George Melford, 
M a picture fairly done which abounds 
in thrills, romance and comedy. The 
cast is well selected and includes Wal- 
ter Hiers, Antonio Moreno, Jacque- 
line Logan and Robert McKim. 

One part of the picture which is 
exceedingly exciting is where a truck, 
carrving Miss Logan and Moreno, 
speeds through a raging forest fire, 
saving a bridge and incidently a large 
body of fire chiefs wdio are sojourning 
in the vicinity. 

It is a fast moving story and al- 
though not many of the scenes were 
the sort which makes a picture truly 
great, the film presents a likeable love 
theme and a generous amount of 
laughs are sprinkled among the dra- 
matic situations. 

Max Dolin, in a classic concert, 
"Robin Mood," did well, and. as in the 
past, his work was received by an ap- 
preciative audience. We was assisted 
by 30 costumed performers. A Christy 
comedy and news reel completed the 
program. 



Imperial 

Although there has been much time 
wasted on non-essentials in the "Lad} 

of Quality" at the Imperial, it is a pic- 
ture well done from an historical and 
pictorial standpoint. 



STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 
THE LEGITIMATE WAY 
Bach beginner is Immediately given 
a ioi.> and productions arranged. 

STUDIO 
.->(i(i Kohler A Chase ltlilg. 

Koariiy 54."»4 



There was a little something miss 
ing in the production to make one go 
home to the fainib and exclaim, "you 
must see that picture at the Imperial 
this week!" But it is not time wasted 
reviewing this film. The scener} was 
perfect anil pretty Virginia Valli as 
the heroine wins the love of the au- 
dience. 

We like Milton Sills' face. It shows 
character. And as the principal young 
man in this play he acts up to his usual 
fine standard, lie wears long blond 
curls which would perhaps be the envy 
of those of the younger generation 
who have shorn their locks and re- 
pented. 

The plot : The girl is raised as a 
boy for reasons of the family fortune 
and she is forced to associate with the 
male members of the household. All 
goes well until the gentleman of her 
heart steps on the screen. He proves 
shiftless and fades away for ten years. 
Meanwhile she falls in love with an- 
other young Lochinvar (Sills). Then 
the old love returns and the fun and 
action starts. 



The Ukrainian National thorns will 
officially re-open the theater Thursday 
evening, January 31. Their engage- 
ment ends Sunday night with a mati- 
nee in the afternoon. 



Symphony Orchestra 

Unusual interest is manifested in the 
fourth popular concert of the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra, Alfred 
Hertz. Conductor, to take place at the 
Exposition Auditorium on Tuesday 
evening, February 5, at S:20 o'clock, 
under the direction of the Municipality, 
the reason being that the soloist will 
lie Josef Schwarz, the famous bari- 
tone. Schwarz created a veritable sen- 
sation when he made his first appear- 
ance in America in this city two 
years ago, with the Chicago Opera 
Company, his "Rigoletto" being pro- 
nounced a masterpiece. He will sing, 
with the orchestra, works of two wide- 
ly different schools — the prologue to 
"I Pagliacci" and Wotan's Farewell, 
from Wagner's "Die Walkure." 



Cameo 

The old problem of business inter- 
fering with the home; the neglected 
wife keeping company with a more 
attentive person than her husband; 
her husband realizing the fact when it 
is almost too late, and, after a reel or 
two, everything fine again and every- 
body happy. 

That is the plot of "Restless Wives" 
playing at the Cameo this week. The 
picture, while not possessing any start- 
ling qualities, has a moral. Perhaps, 
after the man has seen this picture he 
may pay a little more attention to his 
home than to the chase of the elusive 
dollar. 

The cast includes Moris Kenyon, 
[oseph Rennie, Burr Mcintosh and 
Montague Move. Joe Murphy, who plays 
in the movies of the Gumps, looks re- 
markably like the cartoon celebrity and 
appears in person on the stage ami on 
the screen. 

Fmile Linden, the girl orchestra 
leader at the Cameo, almost rivals Paul 
\sh as a maker of jazz and she is pop- 
ular with the audience. 

Tivoli Will Reopen 

'I'he gay old days of musical San 
Francisco will be revived again for it is 
announced that the old Tivoli < >pera 
Mouse, after months of darkness, will 
he re-opened with an entirely new pro- 
gram and polio of music to he pre- 
sented during 1924. 

According to William M. Leahy, 
manager of the theater, it will be the 
center of the best music obtainable in 
San Francisco. I'he place has been 
renovated and redecorated and the 
acoustics of the place are almost per- 
fect. 



Warfield 

Two of America's greatest stars have 
combined their efforts with a well-se- 
lected cast at the Warfield this week 
in the "Song of Move," one of the best 
pictures that have appeared on the 
Warfield screen for several months — 
which is quite a compliment in itself. 
Starring the well known Joseph 
Schildkraut and Norma Talmadge, this 
drama of desert love has been well 
photographed and the scenes have evi- 
dently been selected with care. Schild- 
kraut'- acting is flawless and already he 
has almost as much of a following of 
motion picture goers as he has admir- 
ers of hi- stage ability. 

Starting with this week-, Lipschultz 
gave his concert from the stage and 
he played to an appreciative audience. 
He presented Krisler's "Caprice" with 
the conception of a master. 

Franchon and Marco staged a skit. 
"Broadcasting with Winnie Baldwin." 
They gave a delightful program of ver- 
satility. 'I'he Simondet Sextette pre- 
sented "The Sextette from Lucia" and 
the singing was well done. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Alfred Hertz, Conductor 



Fourth Popular Concert 

' Second BerlM i 

Exposition Auditorium 

Tues. Eve.. Feb. 5, 8:20 

JOSEF 

SCHWARZ 

Baritone, Chicago Open I ■■ 

1,1 1ST AKTI-.T 

Reserved Beato, VI. •'>«■ "•'"' «"«• '■""' 

( No War Tax) 
X,,v Sherman. Cll 

u Auditorium Commits 

aors, .1. Emmet Hayden, <'hairman 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 26. 1924 



ssmmmS 



The Young Wife — The new nurse is 
very scientific. She never let anyone 
kiss the baby while she is around. 

The Husband — Who would? 

And the next day the nurse left. — 
Princeton Tiger. 



A fanner became the father of twins, 
and on learning the news he was so 
delighted that he hurried to the near- 
est post office and sent this telegram 
to his sister-in-law : — 

"Twins today. More tomorrow." 



"How will you have your roast 
beef?'' asked the waiter. 

"Well done, good and faithful ser- 
vant," murmured the clerical-looking 
diner, absent-mindedly. 



"Bobby. I hope you didn't tell your 
parents that you saw me kissing sister 
last night." 

"Nope, I didn't have to. Sis waked 
us all up after you'd gone and told it 
herself." — Boston Transcript. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Goueh 
Telephone Park 271 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 

Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1923 

Assets $89,174,468.57 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 430,275.37 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haisht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave, and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation 

General 

Liability 

Plate Glass 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Accident and 
Health 

Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

1 05 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital 916,000,000 $15,000,000 Reserve Fund 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of James "Wheeler Riley, deceased, No. 
38120. Dept. No. 10. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. J. Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased, to the creditors 
of and all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within four (4) months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
of the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, or to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the first 
publication of this notice to the said adminis- 
trator, at his office, 858 Phelan Building, San 
Francisco. California, which said last-named of- 
fice the undersigned selects as his place of busi- 
ness in all matters connected with said estate of 
James Wheeler Rilev, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES. 
Administrator of the estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, California. Januarv 22nd, 

1024. 
CULLINAN & HICKEY. 

Attorneys for Administrator. 5t 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEETING OF 
STOCKHOLDERS 

Notice is hereby given that the annual meet- 
ing Of the stockholders of PATTEKSi >X RANCH 
COMPANY, a corporation, will be held at the 
office of the corporation, to-wit: the "Directors 
Room," in the building of the Union Trust Com- 
pany of San Francisco, at the junction of Mar- 
ket and O'Farrell streets and CJrant avenue, San 
Francisco. California, on WEDNESDAY, Feb- 
ruary 13. 1924. at the hour of ten o'clock a. m.. 
for the purpose of electing directors for the en- 
suing year and the transaction of any other 
business which may properly come before the 
meeting. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of August Bod, deceased. No. 38116. 
Dept. Xo. in. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 

w. J. Hynes, administrator <>f the estate of 
August Bnd. deceased, t" tin- creditors <>f and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within Eour (4) lis after the first pub- 
lication of this notiee, in the office of the Clerk 
of the Superior Courl of the state of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
Cisco, or to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (1) months after the first 
publication of this notice t<> the said adminis- 
trator, at Ins office, 858 Phelan Building. San 
Francisco, California, which said last-named <>]"- 
fice the undersigned selects as his place of busi- 
ness in all matters connected with said estate of 
August Bod. deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of 
August Bod. deceased 
Dated. San Francisco, California, Januarv 22nd, 

102 1. 
CULLINAN & HICKEY, 



Attorneys for Administrato 



:.i 



W. W. PATTERSON. Secretary. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE JOSHUA 
IIENDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the stockhold- 
ers of The Joshua Hendy [ron Works will be 
held at the office of the corporation, No, 76 
Fremont Street. San Francisco. California, on 
Tuesday, the 12th day of February. 1024, at the 
hour of 10 o'clock a. m.. for the purpose of 
electing a Board of Directors to serve for the 
ensuing year, and the transaction of such other 
business as may come before the meeting. 

CHAS. C. GARDNER, Secretary. 
Office, 75 Fremont Street. San Francisco, Cal. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno. Cal. 



C. LALANNE 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

OLD POODLE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A $1.35 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m. 

to 9 p. m. 

Also A La Carte 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS" FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Begular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays.. $1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

'Half Dollar" Specials 

for the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street ' 



Golden Gate Restaurant 

2721 Hyde St. Phono Franklin 0500 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Afternoon Parties a Specialty 
Dance Italian Dinner 



i S e N*orsy 




CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

"SULPHO" 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 

"■ the new HEXEON ■ 

process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1050 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect S4JS 

WHAT BEST SEKVKS THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES TTS 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3085 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining: to Automobiles 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding — UlacksmlthhiK 

II. W. Culver M. l>aberer E. Johnson 



Phone Garfield 3026 



Palmer Graduate 



Hours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Western Stales Life Building 
!M>."> Market Street San Frunriseo 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE VOUU CARS WASHED 

and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, .15c per day; $7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

SU Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 



AT 



Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 

Be photographed this year on your 
Birthday 



Studios in all Principal Cities of California 



Oakland 
408 14th St. 



San FranoUco 
41 Grant Ave. 



Quality 1866-56 Years--1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following: Places: 

Iturlinrame Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 916 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 14S8 

Economy Darabtllty 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Stilt* Pressed by Hand, Only — 
Suits Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

1'nrisian Dyeing and Cleaning 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 




STOVER 

MONOGRAM SIGNAL 



— Distributors- 



The Safety House, Inc. 

Van Ness Ave. at Bush St. 
San Francisco 

"AUTOMOBILE SAFETY ESSENTIALS" 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

Monte Rio 
Hotel 

Remodeled-Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rooms with Hot and Cold 

Water. 
50 Rooms with Private Bath. 
Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern GRILL on Main Floor. 

Now Open 
NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements. OFFICIAL 
A. A. A. HOTEL. Rates, American 
plan, $4 per day and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE H. CARR, Proprietor. 

Make Reservations in Advance 

See Perk Judah or Crabtrees 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 




W E 



FEBRUARY 16 — 23 

Visitors to the Auto Show are cordially 
invited to make Hotel Plaza their 
headquarters. Every essential to perfect 
comfort, and a splendid program of en- 
tertainment, has been provided. 



w o -r e, i_ 

PLATA 

POST STREET AT STOCKTON 



SAN FRANCISCO 




-the better it gets- 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 
1,800,000 cups were aerved at the Pan- 
ama-Pacific International Exposition. 



Established July 20, 

SAN FRANCISCO 



L 




AND 




PRICE 10 CENTS ~ $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1924 



LOS ANGELES 



*• 



ill 



■■^^ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiflinniiiDa j 




SI XI. AND ANT. CLOUDLAND IX MEXDOCIXO COUNTY 



liiMiiim 



St. Marys 
oAcadi 



emy 



San Leandro, California 

Ps 
For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direct'on of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk it over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system ; it takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 
SPECIALISTS — Extraction!; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges; Porcelain Work 

and Roofless Plates. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

Practice limited to 
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours 10 to 5 — By Appointment — 

Saturday 10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4662 

Removed to Suite 537 Liebes Bldg. 

177 POST STREET 

San Francisco 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1923 

Assets $89,174,468.57 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 430,275.37 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH. West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J£) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital 116,000.000 $15,000,00* Beserve Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

4S6 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



San Francisco Office : 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

Wo will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

7 09 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

817-1S California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



The Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er it be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 
o r stationer t o 




show you samples. ' jpaj^TTTlJ 4 : ■ ■jTan3f 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1856 
41 First Street - - San Francisco 



WEDDINGS A SPECIALTY 

Kelly's Limousine Service "Will Please You 
The finest machines. Dependable, cour- 
teous chauffeurs. No disappointments. 
Reasonable prices. Special rate for shop- 
ping. Open and closed cars. 




Phone Franklin 217 
1629 Pine Street San Francisco 





r»Ubl!»h*d July tO. 1556 







Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. CIV 



SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2. 1924 



No. 5 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AXD CALIFORNIA ADVBR- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. Russ Building, 235 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, 
Calif. Telephone Douglas GS53. Entered at San" Francisco, Calif., Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

— Puzzle: Who is the "Fall" guy in the Teapot Dome 
case ? 

* * * 

— Abe Martin asks: "We wonder how long it's been 
since any woman horsewhipped a masher fer makin' eves 
at her?" 

— The "favorable trade balance" of the United States for 
the year 1923 was $376,000,000 or a little more than an av- 
erage of a million dollars a day, according to the Trade 
Record of the National City Bank of New York. 

* * * 

— The Love Game is always more or less of a Marathon. 
In the first laps, the man runs after the woman and (gener- 
ally) catches her; and then the woman has to run after 
the man ! 

— We are told that the various sections of the shrines 
in King Tutankhamen's Tomb have been found faulty in 
their erection or assembling. So, careless building trades 
men of today, who hurry from your job on the second of 
the whistle's blow, not caring whether your handiwork is 
perfect or not, — beware! Even after three thousand years 
have passed, your sin may find you out! 

— A silly fad. this latest in New York, which is begin- 
ning to creep into the West, — collecting empty glass 
whisky flasks! It is becoming among the elite almost as 
popular as collecting rare china. The first or constituent 
principles being age and color, one hears enthusiastic rav- 
ing over certain "wonderful blues and greens." It reminds 
us of infantile days when we collected glass buttons. 

— Dr. C. B. Pinkham, of the State Board of Medical Ex- 
aminers, is hot foot after the irregular medical practition- 
ers. The small group in power that claims, for a consid- 
eration, to know it all. will not tolerate any competition 
in knowledge. But after all, Pinkham is a very unfortunate 
name with which to go on a hunt for medical purity. 
¥ * * 

— The Locust Plague in South Africa is being meta- 
morphosed into a flourishing industry, under the name of 
the South Attic.-. Locust Products Co. The bodies of the 
Locusts are pounded into a paste and used for poultry and 
cattle food, and also made into a locust meal biscuit which 
is finding favor with white as well as black peoples. (It is 
remembered that John the Baptist's food consisted largely 
of locusts, not locust beans, as is sometimes suggested.) 
These locusts are made into fertilizers, also, for the land 
which they have so often devastated. Which goes to show 
that even insects arc not exempt from the irony of Fate. 



— The Board of Education is buying land and there is 
the deuce to pay in the Board of Supervisors. "It needs 
it," "It does not need it," "There is graft," "No, there isn't." 
That is how a democratic city gets land for its school de- 
partment. Wouldn't it make you sick? 

* * * 

— Some states are taking up the movement to do away 
with billboards along the roads. Some say that billboards, 
along with their other numerous criminal propensities, have 
sold more cigarets to children than any other form of ad- 
vertising. We know that often the most glorious scenery 
is ruined on account of these blatant signs along the high- 
ways. This latter fact alone, should spur beauty-loving 
Californians on to action in removing these hideous blots 
upon our fair landscape. 

— They say that there is a lady who commutes from Los 
Angeles to San Francisco, weekly, all for love ; love of 
her husband, mind you. They give the lady's name in the 
press, which is unkind. I wonder what D. H. Lawrence 
would do with a theme of that sort. Fancy the inside view 
of the lady's mind as she comes and goes, all under the 
psycho-analytical spell of Lawrence. It won't bear think- 
ing about. But what a book he would make of it! 

— Philadelphia is having a discussion among her promi- 
nent citizens on the subject of "unnecessary noises on resi- 
dential streets." A significant fact is that one of the par- 
ticipants is a Doctor of Neurology. Physicians specializ- 
ing in nervous diseases are awakening to the truth that 
noise is a powerful enemy to health, and furthermore, that 
much of the noise of cities is absolutely unessential to de- 
velopment or progress. The City Fathers of San Francisco 
should not allow the Quaker Town to get ahead of us in 
this civic evolution. 

* * * 

— In puncturing the illusion that everybody liked Robert 
Louis Stevenson with his long hair and long' cape, at sight. 
.Mr. Hamilton quotes Andrew Lang, who afterwards be- 
came one of R. L. S.'s dearest friends: "Mcntone. Prome- 
nade. Saw him coming. Didn't like him. Long cape. Long 
hair. Queer hat. Damned queer. Hands: white, bony, 
beautiful. Didn't like the cape. Didn't like the hair. Looked 
like a damned aesthetic. Can't stand them. Talked well. 
But didn't like him. Didn't like him at all. Later — oh. ves 
— but I needn't tell you that. Didn't like him at first. Took 
time." 

* * * 

— "In this time of political crisis and financial depression. 
there is one thing which I and most people want to know 
above all things, ami nobod) seem- able to tell us: AYhat 
; s the spirit of the people?" What are they all thinking 
about? 1 mean the unemployed men and women, little 
families in back streets, making both ends meet somehow 
or other — or not doing so — farm laborers watching so many 
liehls being turned back to grass, clerks and small shop- 
's of country towns, factory hands on short time; this 
nation of ours and its mass mind." — Sir Philip Gibbs. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 2, 1924 




Who would have thought that the radio, 
A Use for Radio which is, so far merely an annex to the 

home and brings one into contact with 
the more or less vulgar and noisy cackle of the outside 
world, could be put to industrial uses so rapidly? Here is 
the Canadian Pacific Railway, which is about to install 
a great central broadcasting system and place a receiving 
station in the house of every employe of the road, order- 
ing one hundred thousand of them. The President of the 
road will talk to all the employes personally every week 
over the radio and tell them just what he expects for the 
coming week. There are two ways of looking at this. If 
we hold to the old doctrine that every man's house is his 
castle, the fact that he will be obliged to listen to the or- 
ders of his business superior in his house, out of working 
hours, would seem to be rather an infringement on per- 
sonal liberty. On the other hand, it will make tremendously 
for efficiency in business. They say that team work is as 
essential to the conduct of modern business as it is in foot- 
ball. How can you get team work to the ultimate degree 
better than through personal contact with the leader of 
the team? It would really seem as if the plan entered 
upon by this clever railroad management was capable of 
indefinite extension. Give workmen radios and they are 
in touch with the world at large and lose their sectional- 
ism. Also consider the possibilities of the radio as an in- 
strument of mobilization in war time. 



also that the Ruhr adventure is producing its vicious eco- 
nomic results and the French elections will tell the story 
of the effect on the French mind. It is very true also that 
the Little Entente, in spite of all the money expended by 
France, is getting restive and can not be relied upon to 
obey orders. Also the British Labor party or rather, Gov- 
ernment, will recognize Russia. And, again, the problem 
as to whether Germany will lie down and die of starva- 
tion quietly is very much to the fore. So the structure yaws 
and rocks under these disturbing and intricate movements. 
The British Premier is taking time by the forelock and 
will try and convert the League of Nations into a real 
force and for that purpose has sent Margaret Bondfield to 
Geneva. "Good old Maggie." as they call her in England, 
is a person of character and force, and worth, as Lady 
Astor savs, any two men in the government. We can only 
sit tight and watch which way the storm breaks, or, if it 
does not break, we can thank Providence that a Scotch- 
man was born with power and brains. 



L'nder the baton of the rain, the orchestra of 
New Life nature has taken up the life-motif and every- 
where throughout the state, there is new force 
and new vigor. Last week we went through the Sacra- 
mento Valley which was languishing under the drought. 
The tone of the people, who came into the car, echoed the 
desolation which seemed to be impending. They talked in 
low tones and always one could catch the note of forebod- 
ing. The brown hills were too brown, and, even from the 
train, the experienced could see that the ranches and or- 
chards were in a precariously critical state. Now. it is all 
changed. On Sunday, we went again over the same route. 
People that came into the cars were dripping and actually 
happy. Their joy ran into expressive gestures and laughter 
was general. There was that little undercurrent of excite- 
ment which pervaded even the most decorous at the time 
of the armistice, a tendency to talk about nothing, an in- 
clination to laugh on the slightest provocation. 

It was obvious that the face of the country had changed. 
A new and intangible something had come and under its 
influence the appearance of even tree and rock was altered. 
A softness had come into the horizon akin to that wonder- 
ful bloom, as it were, which falls on the Monterey Hills 
in the springtime. Where before was death, now there was 
life. Less than forty-eight hours of rain had made the 
change and Nature was already producing new symphonies 
of color and breathing confidence into man and beast. 



We are on the hinge of destiny now. All 
On the Hinge the events that have been piling up since 

the Versailles Treaty are getting to sat- 
uration point and we shall have something happening; 
whether storm or dew. depending upon the way in which 
matters are handled. Europe is in for a show down before 
long. It is very clear that the continued fall of the franc 
will have its effect upon French policy. It is very clear 



If there is one doctrine more American 
"Earn Your than another, it is that of the heading of 
Own Living" this article. Nowhere in the world has the 

idea that it is essential that one should 
make his own way, taken a more complete hold, than in 
this country. Now. this doctrine is enunciated by no less 
a personage than the late German Crown Prince. He has 
said, according to reports, that it is the duty of his sons 
to work and he regards a business career as necessary for 
his oldest. Such a revolution has the war made in the psy- 
chology of the Hohenzollerns. To no one. more than to 
the junker class of Germany, was trade abhorrent and the 
whole system of the former German ruling class was found- 
ed on the notion that the business of an aristocracy was 
ruling and deference must be paid to those who had noth- 
ing to do with trade. 

There is nothing like adversity for teaching the facts of 
life. It is dawning upon those who had formerly wealth 
and high position that these have no certainty and that in 
order to live one must work. It is a lesson that should be 
brought home, even here, for there is a tendency on the 
part of those of established position to neglect the work- 
formula and from this proceeds much of the trouble of to- 
day. Even the war will not have been in vain if it brings 
to the privileged folk the lesson that they cannot exist 
upon privilege but must make their own way. 



One of the worst features of today 
Bad Sensationalism is the blatant and irrepressible call 

for sensation. No evidence has been 
more pronounced than that in the Fall-Doheny matter in 
connection with the oil leases. The whole country appears 
to have leaped to the conclusion that there is something- 
corrupt about it. Even the President has departed from 
his usual healthy calm and talks about prosecutions; a 
result, no doubt, of the political use which his adversaries 
are making of the occasion. But. as a matter of fact, so 
far there has really been nothing actual on which to hang 
such momentous conclusions. Mr. Doheny >ay.s that he let 
Mr. Fall have one hundred thousand dollars. The fact 
that this was an honorable transaction appears in the can- 
dor of the admission, for the money, having been paid in 
currency, could not have been traced if Mr. Doheny had 
chosen to deny it. He says also that the loan meant noth- 
ing to him. because he has so much money that it was of 
no more importance than a loan of twenty-five dollars by 
the average man. This makes it all the more likelv that 
the transaction was square, for a man of affairs possessed 
of so much wealth, to whom money was no object, but 
to whom also reputation was of infinite value, would not 
have jeopardized his chances so readily or so openly. Now, 
conies Mr. Doheny and says that he is readv to give up the 



February 2, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



i of the oil lands unconditionally. Which again 
to show that the money transaction with Fall was in all 
probability just what it is said to have Ik-cm. a mere loan 
for the sake of obliging a friend. 

There is no evidence in this that is not merely circum- 
stantial and which is not capable of a rational and honest 
explanation. 

'The whole question of public lit'e is raised here, [s a 
public man not allowed to have private friends and must 
a man whom fate and ambition have placed in an impor- 
tant public position to be deprived of those friendly ameni- 
ties and kindly benefits, to which other men are not only 
entitled, but the access to which at some time or other is 
necessary to almost everybody? 

If the question is answered in the affirmative and the 
standard is established that no public man can receive pri- 
vate aid. we are in a very awkward position as regards our 
public men. A public man could then accumulate debt 
and place himself under any financial obligation, and the 
necessity would be imposed upon us to protect him against 
the vicissitudes of life and to provide him with means suf- 
ficient to meet all exigencies. This of course is quite im- 
possible. It is our habit to pay our public officials very 
poorly and then to regard them with intense suspicion. 
Such action is not only stupid, it is quite destructive of 
good public service, as no man with an ounce of indepen- 
dence could under such circumstances ever take a public 
office. 



To find out what had become 
The Civic League and the of the Special Committee ap- 
Market Street Railway pointed by His Honor, the 

Mayor, over a year ago, to de- 
termine upon an equitable price which should be submitted 
to the people for the purchase of the properties of the Mar- 
ket Street Railway Company, a resolution was unanimous- 
ly adopted by the Civic League following a report made to 
them by Marshall Hale, Chairman of the League's Com- 
mittee on the Unification of the Street Railways. 

The resolution is as follows: 

"Board of Supervisors, 

City Hall, Civic Center, 

San Francisco, 

Gentlemen : 

"At the regular meeting of the Civic League of Improve- 
ment Clubs and Associations duly held last evening. Janu- 
ary 24th, 1924, the following report of its special Committee 
on' Street Railway Unification, Mr. Marshall Hale. Chair- 
man, was unanimously approved and adopted: 

"'At the last Charter Election of }<>22, the people of 
San Francisco, by nearly two-thirds majority, authorized 
the purchase by the City of the Market Street Railway 
Company's properties, payable out of its earnings, for the 
purpose of unifying the street railways of San Francisco, 
and thus solving the transportation problem. 

"'The outlying districts are still being denied transpor- 
tation facilities h\ reason ><i lack of funds for extensions, 
and the list of Commuters is dailj growing while the Pen- 
insula, tributary to San Francisco, with superior climatic 
condition- remains undeveloped. 

"'The Board of Supervisors, more than a year ago, by 
Resolution, directed His Honor, the Mayor, to appoint a 
Special Committee for the purpose of determining upon an 
equitable price for the Market Street Railway Company's 
properties, and. in the opinion of the undersigned, suffi- 
cient time has elapsed to enable the Special Committee, 
appointed by His Honor, the Mayor, to submit a report. 

"'The undersigned Committee therefore recommends 
that a communication be sent to the Hoard of Supervisors 



asking that a report from the Special Committee appointed 

b) His Honor, the Mayor, be called for.' 

"Pursuant to aforesaid action, I am instructed by our 
Executive Hoard to petition your Honorable Hoard to ask 
for an immediate report from your Special Committee hav- 
ing this matter in hand. 

Very truly yours, 

CIVIC LEAGUE oh" IMPROVEMENT CLUBS AND 

ASSOCIATION'S. 

George W. Gerhard, 

Secretary. " 



A writer on an esteemed contem- 
The Quatr'z Arts Ball porary of our's (we will kindly sup- 
pose in a state of emotional reac- 
tion ) scores the recent Quatr'z Arts Ball at the Fairmont 
as a "riot of profligacy, drunkenness and vulgarity, such as 
this city has rarely witnessed except along that once char- 
tered but now happily faded Alsatia, the Barbary Coast." 
And after much more in the same vein, he ends with "Let's 
have no more of it!" 

We went to the Ball in question about 10:30 p. m. and 
left about 3 :00 o'clock in the morning. During that time 
we wandered through all the rooms thrown open to the 
participants, and found nothing so very shocking; (and 
we have a New Englander somewhere in our ancestry, too !) 
We even penetrated in that so-called Den of Iniquity, the 
"petting room," of which a friend spoke as follows: "A 
friend of mine said that some-one told her that the petting 
room was awful !" 

Although the illumination in this room was of a "dim, 
religious quality," and there were soft cushions to recline 
upon, along the wall, the writer did not witness anything 
"awful" going on. The fact that we were unaware of its 
cognomen until afterwards speaks well for it ! True, there 
were some revelers whom we met (and danced with) who 
had dined not wisely but too well, — but is that occasion for 
vitriolic comment by the press? Is that convivial condi- 
tion synonymous only with the Quatr'z Arts Ball? 

The unique attribute of the whole affair was, that with 
guests numbering into the thousands, from a veritable 
hodge podge of classes, — given carte blanche, more or less, 
as regards the evening's enjoyment, — it functioned so clev- 
erly, entertainingly, colorfully, and circumspectly. 

Let's have another next year ! 



Some of the American newspaper edi- 
A Prince President tors are disposed to treat very lightly 
of the removal of the erstwhile Crown 
Prince to Berlin. Some very well written editorials poke 
fun at this removal of the son of the ex-Kaiser. Evidently, 
these writers have not read history, or they would know- 
that just as much fun was made of the candidacy of Louis 
Napoleon Bonaparte for the Presidency of France. 

Louis Napoleon was elected president and soon after 
there followed the coup d'etat and Napoleon the Third be- 
came a reality. He was at no time a joke but a very able- 
man, who metamorphosed Paris and made so many im- 
provements in all France that his impress on the country 
will last forever. The Crown Prince of Germany is no man 
such as Louis Napoleon, but the German people are so wed 
to the idea of being ruled by decayed royalty that even such 
a wit-less fool as Frederick William would have a chance to 
be elected and the people of Germany would, according to 
those who have been in Germany recently, take the change- 
to an empire from a republic quite as the natural thing. 

i 'ther nations will have something to say as regards any 
developments in Germany in which the Hohenzollerns, 
father or son. are involved. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

Exaggeration on the Stage 

By Nathaniel Anderson 



February 2. 1924 



NOTING that surety of purpose is expected from actors 
who give an interesting performance of the drama, 
and granting the intensity here required, just where is 
marked the jarring note of exaggeration? Undeniably and 
indisputably, wherever it is felt. There never was an ex- 
aggeration on the stage that did not score as such with 
every person in the audience. One does not have to be a 
critic to feel things. Let it be granted that people laugh at 
an unwarranted fulsomeness, that they cry at a sentimental- 
ity that never existed on land or sea, risibilities and emo- 
tions are also wrought up by acting that is toned high and 
true at the same time. It all depends on what is the style 
of drama in hand — and the judgment and finesse of the 
actors. Many a person has sat listening to a drawing-room 
drama, laughing or weeping at what he saw. priding him- 
self he was having a good time at a polite play, though at 
times it was heavens knows what! The closer to life the 
piece that is given, the less over-indulgence in the rendi- 
tion should be permitted. Some readings of lines in other- 
wise finely stylized plays could be the efforts in farce or 
burlesque with exact fitness. The question then asserts it- 
self as to how to be remarkably effective, and at the same 
time true. This is up to the art of the author, the director 
and the actor. 

Perhaps only Shakepeare's judicious One has the right 
to censure and the discriminating will always remain 
the few. but because a man has not the technical knowl- 
edge to point out what is wrong, is no reason why he 
should be a target of bad acting, especially when it is wil- 
ful. Mature at least has provided everybody with a harmo- 
nious nervous constitution, and until it is "jazzed" down 
to the lowest possible condition, he will have an instinct 
about the fitness of things, and it is within the rights of 
audiences that their sensibilities should not lie shocked or 
their natural tastes lowered. When one comes to think of 
it, the abused critic ought to be a great protection to the 
public. 

After a player overcomes the negative way of proceeding 
which he retains as an amateur, and when as a professional 
he secures his voice and some strength, he should also have 
a little art, or look to it that he strives for reality and truth 
and exact interpretation and not noise and over-emphasis. 
Those who listen should be pleased with good work, and it 
indicates lack of ability where the listeners are figuratively 
pounded with voice or movement from the stage. "Poetic 
license" is all very well, but it, too, must be sanely meas- 
ured by realities. Exaggerations are usually the marking 
lines of where good acting stops. In many otherwise splen- 
did performances that grow out of first-class rehearsals, we 
have burlesque sounds and movement, carefully worked- 
out crudities, but crudities nevertheless. 

These points have often been proved, so amply demon- 
strated that there is no doubt of the difference between 
cheap effects and the fine, full, sure result arrived at by 
the careful practice of an artist who seeks for just the tell- 
ing qualities necessary. Why is the bombastic style a thing 
of the past? Because in this particularly has the stage pro- 
gressed. One actor of good enough reputation, and with 
incontestible ability played "Hamlet" splendidly, but with 
a plentitude in the wrong spots. He could be outmatched 
— this is stage history — and he was, for soon came along 
the quiet, sure, strong, vibrant man, the genius. The second 
was so much the superior that it was provincial to men- 
tion the two in the same breath. Quality is what is wanted' 
it represents advancement in the theatre and elsewhere. It 
educates, because the public is susceptible to it, even ad- 



mitting it can be influenced by the tawdry and the foolish. 
For an even, hitting performance, Mr. Charles Coburn's 
work in "So This Is London," lately in San Francisco, 
should be given the praise of the experts. He passed over 
many temptations for ridiculous acting. As a contrast to 
an effete Englishman, a character made to represent the 
British nation, Mr. Coburn played a blunt American. He 
did the trick to the fullest extent, giving neatly and whole- 
heartedly all values required in the particular kind of 
drama that was played, but showed us a man we are in 
the habit of liking, and in no way the two-footed bear we 
read about and are expected to admire in our literature. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Sutter 0180 



Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Ness Ave., at Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 




romantic 
America, 

East 

and there are 

9 all year © 

excursions 

at reduced round trip 
rates to midcontinent 

and Atlantic Coast points 
Stopovers anywhere 
Fred. Harvey meals 

■J°f details and reservations 

R. D. Johnson, Div. Pass. Agt., 601 Market Street, or 
Perry Depot, Phone Sutter 7000 

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February 2, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




CORD 



By ANTISTHENES 

— Paralleling in ultra misidentification Belle Bennett's 

declaration that her husband is not her husband is C. C. 

fulian's statement that he was not C. C. ]ulian. 
* * * 

— H. O. Harrison, local auto dealer, has sent his $15,000 
bull to his ranch at woodland. Some bull, but, nothing' to 
compare with what's always with us. 

— As a sequel to the plethora of gymnastic stunts in- 
dulged in these (.lays by our boys during- what should be 
school hours, the lads will be well qualified, in their coming 
battle for existence, to pass all tests — from the neck, down. 

— A man-hating' sorority has been organized at Coe Col- 
lege, Iowa, and coeds at University of Southern California 
"pray" the society be extended to their school. As mem- 
bership is limited to "those who have loved and lost." the 
society should soon outrank, numerically, all other sorori- 
ties. 

— Which? Amazing lies, or. remarkable coincidences? 
William H. Anderson, head of the anti-saloon league, says: 
He received $25,000 from a man who has completely van- 
ished; loaned the 25 thou, to a Mr. Mann whom it is im- 
possible to locate; a Dr. Baldwin could corroborate in both 
these statements but — the doc is dead!! 

— From now on till after the national conventions the 
voter might as well gird himself against viewing the gro- 
tesque political marathon of canditorial deception — two big 
parties lumberingly maneuvering to avoid definiteness on 
prohibition — actually the outstanding question in the Unit- 
ed States today! And we wonder why millions do not 
vote ? 

— A mammoth typewriter, bearing the name of the man- 
ufacturer, was erected in the civic center plaza a few days 
ago, hence, three questions: Who allows these mutilations 
of public property? What is paid for rental and who gets 
it? Or, — who is foolish enough to allow this thing and its 
kindred street "fairs" etc. and not gather in a rakeoff? It's 
positively unsafe for the public to have so unbalanced a 

fellow at large. 

* * * 

— Colonel Charles K. Forbes, former chid of the Vet- 
erans' Bureau, is "censured" for his "activities" in that of- 
fice! Apparently, hanging is becoming obsolete, tor men 
have died through neglect of this bureau. However, Forbes' 
alibi may be that chiefs of these outfits are supposed to 
merely travel, cat, drink and be merry at government ex- 
pense — if they were paid for accomplishments the jobs 
would go a-begging. 

* * * 

— When recently, Senator Caraway accused former Sec- 
retary of the Interior Fall of being a worse traitor than 
Benedict Arnold, because of his suspicious connection with 
the Teapot Dome oil concession, he smote, hip and thigh. 
all tradition in cautious accusatives in high places. Irre- 
spective of the senator's correctness in the premises, it is 
to be regretted that effemination of \merican men's public 
Utterances is well nigh complete. We sigh for the time 
of absolute expression when an ace was called an ace and 
a spade a spade. 



THE CALL OF THE WARD 

Headed by one George Watson, a l'>25 model political 
outfit is being assembled with the members thereof gird- 
ing hip and thigh to work for a division of San Francisco 
into supervisorial sections — each section to vote for a su- 
pervisor representing that district. 

Politics, like water, seeks its own level. With the ad- 
vent of civil service, civic leagues and kindred interferences, 
the old-time preserves have been opened to the public and 
now citizens actually tread with shod feet in the sanctum 
where once were wont to pussyfoot the soft-heeled and 
aspirate-voiced guardians of municipal government. To this 
condition the old-school politician cannot grow accustomed 
— too much sunlight, spotlight and light of reason now 
break through the miasmas clouding the ball wicks of stereo- 
typed oratory where once only the procession torchlight 
guided the stumbling feet of the uninitiated who would 
rashly venture in. 

The Missouri-ing of the people has been accomplished 
to the point where irreverent citizens now inquire what be- 
comes of their tax money; they have, on occasions, even 
unleashed the recall to pluck off governmental servants 
deemed negligent in their stewardship. These and similar 
acts have so altered the face of things political that a 
dyed-in-the-wool and departed old-timer, should he by some 
agency yet to be devised, come from beyond the Styx to 
view his former stamping ground, would be shocked back 
whence he came, on witnessing the changed order of affairs. 

But now, just as vox populi is beginning to peep audibly 
amid the din of modern bustle, come the hard-pressed sur- 
vivors of the past from out their hibernating quarters to 
plea for a re-trial of the ward system in politics. And, 
strange as it may appear, these have a following, who, ap- 
parently enervated by the manna of practically honest gov- 
ernment now obtaining, (and bearing out the prophecy 
of Barnum), are actually sighing for another whack at the 
decadent municipal relic. Of course, the ward system of 
electing supervisors has been tried and found wanting; 
but, advice to voters being about as welcome to them as 
a "flu" visitation, some morsel might be thrown in to ap- 
pease these hungry after change. 

It is asserted there are too many supervisors; that the 
supervisorial work is a side issue in the lives of the legis- 
lating eighteen; that the "let George do it" inclination 
among the dozen and a half is an obsession; that only a 
couple of wheel boys strain their Auroch's thews to keep 
agoing the ponderous chariot of state! Now, some of this 
is not untrue and the worst is unrelated, so. why not re- 
duce their number to six, triple the remuneration of these, 
make it incumbent that the half-dozen work eight hours 
a day and beat their official cylinder runabout into a time 
clock as there would no longer exist a reason for its being? 
This might suit the ward fans, promote efficiency and 
edifv those who earn their bread laboriously. 



— Is this English? "1 can recall no more striking ease 
of exaggeration than that which appears in one of the 
afternoon papers of today as to the headlines and text of 
its front page article concerning 'red plot at University of 
California.' etc.:" "Neither yesterday nor today did Dean 
Wood make statements to the author of the article which 
would justify the matter in writing, etc."; These statements 
in "our language" were attributed to President W. W. 
Campbell of California University by a San Francisco 
paper! 1- it possible, or. may it be the work of a reporter 
inclined to the cubist in English? 
* * * 

— Vet a little while ago one had to be keen of sight to 
be rewarded when in search of a drink, but times have 
changed Joseph < Itt, stone blind and residing in 141 S Kllis 
street, some days ago was fined $100 by Federal Judge 
Partridge for imbibing prevolstead fluid. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 2, 1924 




I'VE WORKED FOR A SILVER SHILLING 

I've worked for a silver shilling! 

I've slaved for a friend ; 
And ever the work was willing, 

Though much to mend. 

Yet of the years' achieving 

Little I find 
Worth pride, or hope, or grieving 

Or calling to mind. 

But love and laughing youth 
And a rain-washed spring; 

These were truth, 

And a memorable thing. 

— Charles W. Kennedy, in "Scribner's." 



INHIBITION 

I live a hidden life unguessed, 
A life of quaint, fantastic schemes ; 
I dwell with flushed, romantic dreams 
And freakish humors unconfessed. 

Though I can show the world a mein 
As cold as any judge's mask . . . 
(The judge, too, lives behind his task 
And traffics with a realm unseen) . . . 

Behind the placid front of use 

The baffled whims move to and fro ; 

We fear to let these genii go, 

Their wings grotesque we dare not loose. 

But sober-faced in church or mart. 
In office, street or drawing-room, 
We carry caged to the tomb. 
The golden nonsense of the heart. 
-From "Poems and Portraits" by Don Marquis. 



PRAISING HER HANDS 

Your hands I love so well that I could lie 
All day and hold their coolness to my lips. 

Or trace the violets in their ivory, 

And learn their shape from wrist to finger-tips. 

Pale I have seen them as white lilies are, 

And then I thought I knew no lovelier thing, 

Till summer's sun espied them from afar. 
And kissed them, as a captive, not a king. 

Now, whether brown becomes them more than white, 

I can not tell, they are too dear to me — 
Your hands, more delicate than birds in flight. 

Sweeter to smell than blossomed hawthorn-tree. 

So proud they lie, and quiet, who could guess. 
Those hands know moods of sudden tenderness? 

— Narcisse Wood, in "Poetry." 



FUSCHIA 

Across my breast 

A purple sword was struck. 

It left me bleeding on the grass : 

A ghost in scarlet 

Of the girl I was. 

— Gladys Wilmot Graham. 



THE AUSTRALIAN STATE MERCHANT MARINE 

The news comes by cable that the Australian govern- 
ment will now sell its mercantile marine and go out of the 
shipping business. 

Australia has ever been the place in its various states, 
where all kinds of experiments have been had with state or 
municipal ownership or operation of activities. About 
everything which the mind of man might conceive could 
be run by the government of provinces, states, or towns 
has been tried in Australia. Some parts of Australia have 
gone municipal ownership mad, others have gone union 
labor insane, while still others have applied every idea of 
taxation which might be suggested to make the going easier 
for its citizenship. 

During and immediately after the war Australia acquired 
a mercantile marine. Now it wishes to sell it and, mayhap, 
it has already parted company with its ocean carriers. Be- 
fore we have more details on this sale of ships we may not 
safely say that this sale is another bit of evidence against 
the public ownership and control of what should remain 
owned and controlled by private corporations. 

We do know, however, that Australia, in some of the 
states of the Commonwealth, operates the coal mines and 
we do know it to be undenied that private corporations 
could operate those mines much more effectively and eco- 
nomically. Here it is openly admitted that government 
operation is a failure, but it is also said there is no likeli- 
hood of any change as to conditions. 



MEN, END AND MEANS 

In the trial of William II. Anderson, superintendent of 
the New York Anti-saloon League, on charges of forger}', 
the evidence being unloosed should make bootleggers pon- 
der whether or not they are on the piker's side of the 
liquor contention when it comes to harvesting the root of 
all evil. It seems Andy gets ten thousand of the silver 
discs per annum for driving rum from out of the United 
States temple of sobriety, but, like the bootlegger, this 
rakeoff doesn't sate him — he demanded another cut from 
his trusted lieutenant. A. Berstall Phillips, a "zealot" whom 
testimony shows is built of grab from the insoles up and 
doesn't care whether God or Satan hires him. Accused of 
selling munition secrets to the Germans during the war 
he refused to "incriminate himself"; however, he did relate 
how he signed a fake salary contract for "only" $7500 a 
year, "to show Rockefeller in case the gas king ever wanted 
to see the League's payroll." (And that reminds us — old 
John has just stuck on another raise in gasoline prices.) 
Incidentally, in a spirit of vanity. Anderson related how a 
"perfect stranger" salved him with $25,000 in recognition 
of his work. I We'll say this was a "perfect" stranger!) 

And thus the tale "that he who runs may read": There's 
big money in moralizing and apparently "the end justifies 
the means." 



— A\ e thought Pete McDonough and nephew Harry Rice, 
convicted a year ago in May, of downright careless infrac- 
tions of Volstead inhibitions, had all these months been 
guests of one of our wardens, but it seems since a jury 
found them guilty on evidence as open as the face on the 
ferry clock, they have been mingling freely with the rest 
of us unconvicted violators. So, why all our unnecessary 
precautions? 



— Never, until recently, has it so forcibly been brought 
to our notice how backward a set we are here in San Fran- 
cisco ; we were forced to import from somewhere — was it 
Louisiana? — a superintendent of schools, and, now, accord- 
ing to newspaper report, this superintendent. Mr. Gwinn, 
who is forming a "bureau of service." states he has been 
unable to find a qualified local candidate to head the out 
fit! So, with heads bowed down, we now await a new im- 
portation from Louisiana. 



February 



1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




.WVejyou 

" HEtfRDIT? 



— "How is it?" asked an Englishman of an American 
friend, "that the Yankees get on well in business, while 
many Englishmen tail?" 

"Brains, my boy!" was the reply. "You should eat move 
fish. Give me five dollars and I'll get you some of the fish 
that my wife gets for me. Eat it and see how you gel on." 

The Englishman parted with his five dollars and the fish 
was sent to him. Next day he met the Yank again. "Mow 
did you get on?" the Yankee asked. 

"'Well, it was splendid fish !" 

"Do you feel any different?" 

"No, I can't say I feel any different," said the English- 
man, "but five dollars was a lot for a piece of fish, wasn't 
it?" 

"There you are!" said the Yank. "Your brain is be- 
ginning to work already!'' 

* * * 

— A very deaf old lady was plaintiff in an action for 
damages in connection with a street accident. The judge, 
finding the case tedious, suggested a compromise, and asked 
the plaintiff's counsel to inquire what she would take to 
settle the case. 



"His lordship wants to know what you will take," roared 
the learned counsel into the old lady's ear. 

\ smile spread over her face as she replied, "I am verj 
much obliged to his lordship. 1 think I would like a drop 
of gin!" * * * 

— Mrs. Whann, the weeping widow, requested that the 
words "My sorrow is greater than I can bear" be placed 
upon the marble slab. 

A few months later she returned and asked how much 
it would cost to have the inscription effaced and another 
substituted. 

"No need of that, ma'am," replied the mason; "you see, 
I left enough room to add 'alone'." 

* * * 

— "You wanta da hair cut?" asked the Italian barber. 
"Den I calla my brother Petro." 

"Is he better at hair-cutting than you?" asked the new 
patron. 

"Petro mucha better. He tella da wonderful ghosta story 
an' maka da hair rise, an' he no lossa time holdin' it up 

wid da comba." 

* * * 

— Little Margaret was talking to a family of kittens, 
which she snuggled closely in her arms. A thoughtful pause 
caused her mother, who was sitting near her, to pay some 
attention to what was coming next. "Kitty," said the lit- 
tle girl, "I know your little brothers and sisters; but I've 
never seen your papa. I 'spect he must be a traveling man, 
like Daddy." 



A pale, proud girl turned to the big, 
heavy-browed man who was gazing at 
her intently. He held a glittering knife 
in his hand. "Have you no heart?" she 
asked in low, even tones. "No," he 
growled. "Then give me ten cents' 
worth of liver." 




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"Fader, poor old Ikey has just died 
after that Scotsman paid him the half- 
crown he owed him." "I suppose it vas 
the shock?" "No, fader — it was lead 

poisoning." 



"Have you forgotten that $5 you owe 
me?" "By no means. Didn't you see 
me try to dodge into that doorway?" — 
Boston Transcript. 



"Does Jimmy remember the anniver- 
sary of your marriage?" "Never. I re- 
mind him of it in January and in June 
and get two lots of presents a year!" — 
London Mail. 



"What, the engagement is off? Why 
she told me she adored every hair on 
his head." "Yes. but not every hair on 
his shoulder." 



"Ma'am, there's a man at the door 
with a parcel for you." "What is it. 
Bridget?" "It's a fish, ma'am, and it's 
marked C. < >. D." "Then make the man 
take it back. I ordered trout." 



"But, John, dear, before we were 
married you told me you were worth 
$50 a week." "1 am. but the boss just 
gives me $20." — Oregon Lemon Punch. 



Bill — Yes, sir. Jim is now in the pub- 
lic eye. Phil — Is he in politics? Bill — 
No; he makes hot cakes in a restaurant 
window. 



"San Francisco 
Girl Gunners" 

If you are one of those 
people who think wo- 
men can't shoot, you will 
change your opinion aft- 
er seeing the front page 
of next Sunday's Rota- 
gravure section, as it 
shows several girl gun- 
ners from San Francis- 
co, ending a happy day 
in the marshes, each 
with the day's limit. An- 
other attractive local 
page shows the beauty 
spots 

"Along 
the Skyline" 

of the new San Fran- 
cisco-San Mateo boule- 
vard. Here are a half 
dozen beautiful pictures 
that everyone will wish 
to keep. Still another 
local page shows the 
beauties of the new 
Park Aquarium. In ad- 
dition are all the latest 
foreign news pictures, 
and a page of fashions 
that will please the 
women. There is a big 
treat for everyone in the 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 2. 1 ' »24 




JownMLCrier 



jl WHO THE DEVIL ART THOU, 

'ONE THfiTWILL PLAY THE 
) DEVIL,5IRWITH YOU" 

Shakspeare- , 



— It was said the other day by a prominent person that 
the matter of manufacturing and industrial sites in San 
Francisco is becoming important. The speaker pointed out 
that while new plants come into the state, they do not 
come to this city. They go to the East Bay District. Per- 
haps it is a pity that they do not establish themselves on 
the peninsula. But there are many good reasons to the 
contrary. The solution of the whole problem lies in the 
recognition of the essential unity of the San Francisco re- 
gion. Once establish that, and the mere place of settlement 
of the industries does not matter. 



— Alexander Hume Ford. Director General of the Pan- 
Pacific Union, from Honolulu, has arrived to enroll key 
men of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce as dele- 
gates to the Pan-Pacific Food Conference to be held at 
Honolulu in July. Of course he was entertained at lunch- 
eon. We see also that the San Francisco Real Estate Board 
is down for a big luncheon. Any hotel will show at least 
five social group luncheons going on. It would seem that 
there would have to be food conservation somewhere. 
Never was there such a lot of public eating. 



— Somebody hired a municipal bus in Oakland to com- 
pete with the railroad traffic. Now the city will not audit 
the bill and the automobile company is up against a law- 
suit. But who has taken the fares collected during the 
period of use? There, is a little question. The nickels are 
off, and where, no one seems to know. By the way. the 
bus proves that gasoline can put up a fight against elec- 
tricity for street traffic. The auto-bus should have a fu- 
ture even on the coast. 



— The News Letter has over and over again called at- 
tention to the street traffic and the consequent need of 
rational control and regulation. We are a curious people, 
we .Americans, who endure more than any other people and 
are a sort of morons in some respects. Thus, fifteen thou- 
sand people were killed last year by automobiles. Fifteen 
thousand! It sounds incredible. Are we going to perpetu- 
ate this disgrace to our power of street management? 



— The I. W. W. have come out with a circular calling on 
the authorities to enforce the criminal syndicalist law. They 
have their nerve with them. But who can say they are not 
justified? Has anybody here seen even an attempt to put 
down their blatant mouthings? We have to give even the 
devil credit, for his virtues and assurance is an I. W. W. 
virtue. 



— Who salted the debate at Berkeley with radical litera- 
ture? The President is worried and declares that he did 
not do it and he does not think that any of the professor-, 
either, did it. But the stuff was there. That does not help 
donations to the university and Dr. Campbell, as a good 
business man, knows it. 



— All sorts of horrible stories are being printed in a local 
paper about the price that girls have to pay for success in 
the movie business. It has always been the same story in 
the theater game, and we don't pay any attention to it. It 
is universal, even in the department stores. If a girl does 
better than others there, the others always have their ex- 
planation. Nothing to it. 



— An increase of three hundred per cent in burglaries in 
one city in a vear is certainly something to open your eyes 
and make you wonder. That is what they are up against 
in Los Angeles. None of the explanations such as police 
mistakes, judicial incompetence, or even the general un- 
satisfactoriness of the legal profession, hit the mark. It 
is not capable of any reasonable explanation at present. 
This item is no knock at Los Angeles; the same thing 
might happen anywhere. But why? 



— It is good to see that William H. Metson is really 
taking the field in his fight on the Prohibition Amendment. 
He is a fighter when he starts, as is well known, and just 
as clever in his methods as he is strong in attack. Who 
but he would have thought of getting a scholar and a 
churchman like Father Kavanagh to make a speech against 
the total abstinence fanatics? Also a speaker from New 
Zealand is to show what the good folks there think about 
it all. It should be a corking good meeting. 



— The governor's literary style is strong and a trifle un- 
usual. I wonder what sort of people they will think we 
were a hundred or so years from now. when the historical 
student, turning up the records, finds the following: "What 
moron started the present agitation on the matters, is for 
psychologists to answer." Whether the form of English 
employed or the manner of diction be taken into account, 
the results are equally appalling. There is something a bit 
Cromwellian about our quaker governor. 



— The calendar of the District Court is simply disgrace- 
ful. It would be impossible to even call the list of cases 
in a day let alone do anything with them. If an ordinary 
business were conducted in this fashion, bankruptcy would 
be certain. 



4 



trains 
daily 

(EACH WAY) 



PORTLAND 

$48.75 

TACOMA 

$58.25 

SEATTLE 

$60.75 

VICTORIA 

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VANCOUVER 

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until April 30 

Return Limit 
May 31, 1924 

Stop overs 
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Southern Pacific 



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Phone Sutter 4000 



February -'. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




By KEM 

"If a book is worth reading, it is worth buying." — Ruskin. 

Ruskin would certainly repent the Foregoing aphorism 
with emphasis if he could only have visioned forward to 
the present (lav and had the two first volumes of Drink- 
water's "THE OUTLINE OF HISTORY" spread before 
his beauty-loving eyes, to say nothing here at this time of 
the companion volumes: "THE OUTLINE OF SCI- 
ENCE" and "THE OUTLINE OF ART." 

The average reader naturally gravitates to the "OUT- 
LINE OF LITERATURE," and if he has the poet Keats' 
eye for color, and "loves crimson in his soul," he will re- 
joice over the brilliant jackets which give the aim of this 
great work : 

"A Plain Story Simply Told" with more than 500 illus- 
trations, including many full-page plates in color, in which 
we are given a generous taste of the "great books of all 
ages, from the time of Homer to the present day, whose 
power and charm have thrilled the souls of succeeding gen- 
erations." 

The print is clear and inviting" and the text is culled for 
us by the great master mind who gave us the play "ABRA- 
HAM LINCOLN," so we have this guarantee that we will 
he given not only the wit and wisdom, the letter of these 
great writers, but also a glorious glimpse of their souls. 

These hooks are not for the "specialist" nor for those 
bent on research to bolster up "learned arguments or criti- 
cal dissertations," but they are for the busy man who has 
long neglected the worthwhile literature he once scanned 
with a youthful mind ; for the rushed modern woman who 
has either forgotten or never had a chance to absorb these 
riches she now needs "to keep up with the procession" — 
for the young readers who love pictures, beauty, who 
haven't time or opportunity to go to the thousand sources 
these books were gathered from. 

Impatient fingers running hastily over the introductory 
hooks — the first ones in the world, will have to pause be- 
fore . . . "the face that launched a thousand ships, and 
burnt the topless towers of Ilium!" a copy of the famous 
painting l>v Lord Leighton, also his "Captive Andro- 
mache;" Hume-Jones' "Dream of Sir Launcelot" or Watts' 
painting of "The Happy Warrior:" These famous pictures 
always enthrall as well .'is the well chosen stories surround- 
ing them. 

The chapter on the "Rise of the Novel" is fascinating as 
well as the renewal of acquaintance with Jane Austin, the 
first of the "Realists" who woke up a romantic-adventure 
loving world to realize that the most absorbing fairy tale 
is the chronicling of our own daily life and its little hazards 
and annoyances. Drinkwater tells us "To the reader who 
asks that a novel shall take him 'out of himself Jane 
Austin's appeal is small. Rut is that quality the test of a 
good novel? Is not the true test its power to take us into 
ourselves — that is to say, into our human nature, of which 
the true and livelj exhibition is the very purpose of all 
drama?" We have to stop and think and ask how many of 
the modern writers do this — and what do the ones who do 

make us find? Anyway, Drinkwater is one, and we 
gladly renew our acquaintance with the French literature 
that made the revolution; look at the eighteenth century 
poets through his eyes, loving the pearl- he has secured 
fi ir us in his divings. 

Robert Rums gets a whole chapter to himself. V 
with him to the "Rums" cottage "A National Shrine." and 



love the Burns pictures and poems he gives us, and though 

"Nae treasures nor pleasures 
t ould make us happy king ; 
The heart aye's the part aye 

That makes us right or wrang" 

we feel these hooks are treasures that would add to any- 
one's pleasures, and are looking forward to publication of 

the third volume that is promised soon. 

Putnam; Volumes 1 and 2, $4.50 each. 



— All of the officers of the San Francisco V. M. C. A. 
have entered upon a new term, having been re-elected by 
the board of directors at the last annual meeting held re- 
cently. They are John H. McCallum, president; George C. 
Boardman, first vice president; Judge Curtis D. Wilbur, 
second vice president; Frank I. Turner, recording secre- 
tary, and Franklin P. Nutting, treasurer. The board ap- 
pointed Raymond W. Blosser comptroller of the associa- 
tion. He will occupy this position in addition to his present 
duties as executive secretary of the Golden Gate avenue 
branch of the "Y." 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 2. 1924 




BUSY CIPID 

MISS FRANCES PRINGLE and George MacDonald have decided 
on March 12 as the date of their wedding. It will take place 
at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Pi in- 
gle, in the evening. 

MISS MARGARET WEBSTER is announcing her engagement to 
Mr. William Norris King. Miss Webster is the only child ot 
Mr and Mrs. Frederick Webster, member of an earlj day 
prominent family of San Francisco. Mr. King is the young- 
est son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick King and a grandson ot 
the late Thomas Starr King, the celebrated orator and diyine. 
The wedding will take place about May. The couple will re- 
side in this city. 

MISS H vZEL DAVIS, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Davis of 
San Francisco, and Mr. Otto Ludewig Jr. of Richmond an- 
nounced their engagement Saturday afternoon at a tea given 
by Mrs. Eugene Trabucco and Miss Gwendolyn Cochrane. The 
affair was held at the Palace Hotel. 

MISS JEAN CLIFT SEARLES has set the date for her marriage 
to M. Jean Delattre-Seguy for February 11. The wedding 
will take place at half past four in the afternoon at the 
home of the bride's mother, Mrs. Mailler Searles. in Pied- 
mont. It will be a small wedding and only relatives and 
intimate friends have been invited. Miss Emily Clift Searles 
will be maid of honor. Mr. Frank L. Belknap of Chicago 
will be the best man. After their wedding trip the couple 
will go to Chicago to make their home temporarily. 

MISS KATHERINE STONE, daughter of Mrs. L. D. Stone, will 
be married to Harold Black, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Black 
of this city, on March 4. Mr. Black is of the law firm of 
McCutchen. Olney Mannon & Greene. His father is also a 
member of the bar in this State. Mrs. Black returned re- 
cently from Los Angeles, where she visited her daughter, Mrs. 
Carroll M. Wagner (Marion Black), and another daughter, 
Mrs. William Kew. 

IAXCHEOXS 

MRS. WHITELAW REID, who is spending the spring in her home 
in Millbrae, was the guest of honor at a luncheon at which 
Mrs. Edward Simpson entertained Wednesday afternoon. The 
party was held at the Fairmont Hotel. 

MRS. E. HOPE SLATER of Washington and Newport is at the 
St. Francis and is spending a few days in town before going 
to Santa Barbara for the remainder of the winter. She was 
the guest of honor at a luncheon given on Monday by Mrs. 
Charles Templeton Crocker. 

MISS MARION FITZHUGH gave a large luncheon Tuesday at 
the Woman's Athletic Club for two engaged girls. Miss Ger- 
trude Bangs, whose engagement to Mr. William Shaw was 
recently announced, and Miss Mary Gorgas, who is engaged 
to Lieutenant Matthias Gardner, U. S. N. 

MR. AND MRS. ANDREW WELCH, who will take their de- 
parture from San Francisco shortly, will be the guests of 
honor at a large luncheon given on Sunday by Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick W. McNear. The affair will be given at the Mc- 
Near home at Burlingame. Mrs. Welch and her daughter. 
Miss Marie Welch, have set February S as the date of their 
departure. 

MRS. GEORGE LEIB was a luncheon hostess Tuesday at her 
home in Buchanan street, when she entertained in honor 
of her mother, Mrs. John Haldeman of Kentucky. Mrs. Halde- 
man has been passing the midwinter months in San Fran- 
cisco. 

MRS. MILTON BUGBEE, who is spending the midwinter months 
in town, will entertain at a luncheon next Tuesday for 
Mrs. Clement Tobin, which will be held at the Women's Ath- 
letic Club. 

MRS. CLEMENT TOBIN was the incentive for a luncheon given 
Tuesday by Mrs. Thomas Driscoll at her home in San Mateo, 
which was attended by several guests from town and a group 
of the peninsula society set. 

MRS. CULLEN WELTY will be hostess at a luncheon party on 
February 7, in honor of Miss Betty Knight Smith. It will 
be at the Francesca Club. 

MISS CAROLINE MADISON was a luncheon hostess Tuesday 
afternoon when she complimented Miss Julia Adams and her 
cousin. Miss Idabelle Wheaton. The parly was held at the 
home of the hostess in Stanford Court and was enjoyed by 
the debutante set. 



MRS. ANDREW WELCH was hostess at a large lunchean Wed- 
nesday at her home in Broadway, which was the first of a 
series of affairs that she will give before her departure for 
Europe. 

MRS. RENNIE P. SCHWERIN, who is entertaining at a series 
of affairs during her stay in San Francisco, was luncheon 
hostess Tuesday at her apartment at Stanford Court, where 
she is established for the remainder of the winter. 
TEAS 

MRS. ADOLPH SPRECKELS and Mrs. Alexander de Bretteville 
will give a tea at the Spreckels home in Washington street 
this Saturday afternoon. The function is being held in honor 
or Mr. Richard Hall, a portrait artist who has recently com- 
pleted portraits of the hostesses. Mr. Hall, who has been 
visiting here, lived for years in Paris and in Buenos Aires 
and is also well known in New York. While in the latter 
city he did five portraits of members of the Vanderbilt fam- 
ily, of Mrs. Charles M. Schwab and of Mrs. Herman Oelrichs. 
Mrs. Spreckels' portrait shows her seated in a silver chair 
presented to her by Queen Marie of Rumania. Mrs. de Brett- 
ville is shown with her son, in a garden setting. 

MISS OLIVE REED CUSHMAN entertained a number of her 
friends at a musicale tea at her home across the bay re- 
cently, the afternoon being in honor of Madame Caro Roma, 
a California composer of note. 

MRS. JAMES FRANCIS DUNNE was the guest of honor at a 
recent tea at the Palace Hotel given by Mrs. William Deamer. 

MRS. WALTER SMITH and her daughter, Mrs. Austin Sperry, 
were joint hostesses at an attractive tea given on Saturday 
afternoon at the Hotel St. Francis. 
BRIDGE 

MISS KATHERINE MACKALL, who will "become the bride ot 
Mr. William Elie Jason Jr. in April, will be the incentive 
for a bridge tea given by Mrs. James Schlesinger on Febru- 
ary 13th. 

MISS INEZ MARION has issued cards for a bridge tea at the 
Fairmont Hotel on Tuesday, February 5, in honor of Miss 
Leonore Fitzgibbon, whose engagement to Brooke Mohun was 
recently announced. 

MAH JONGG 

MISS ANITA BERENDSEN, the bride-elect of Mr. Sanford Mar- 
rian Dickey Jr.. will be the complimented guest at a mail 
jongg party given on the afternoon of February 13, by Mrs. 
Reed Funston. The affair will be held at the home of the 
hostess in Vallejo street. 

MRS. MACONDRAY MOORE entertained at a mah jongg party 
Tuesday for airs. Norris King Davis at her home in Broad- 
way. Mrs. Davis has been entertained continuously since her 
arrival from the south and Tuesday's party brought together 
a congenial group of her close friends. 

MRS. SIDNEY VAN WYCK PETERS, for whom many affairs 
have been given since her arrival in San Francisco, was the 
guest of honor at a mah jongg party given last Thursday 
afternoon by Mrs. Robert Miller. The affair was held at the 
home of the hostess in Clay street. 

MRS. BENJAMIN F. SHAW will entertain at a luncheon and 
bridge and mah jongg on Friday afternoon. February 15th, 
at the Woman's Athletic Club. The affair is in honor of 
.Airs. Calhoun L. La Rue. 

DINNERS 

MISS GWYNETH GAMAGE. whose marriage with Mr. Arthur 
Wilde of Seattle will be an event this Saturday, entertained 
the members of her bridal party at a dinner Wednesday eve- 
ning. The affair was held at the Palace Hotel. 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE A. NEWHALL will give a dinner party 
at their home this Saturday evening preceding the second 
performance of the Peninsula Players, which will be given 
at the playhouse on the George A. Pope estate. 

MRS. H. H. DURYEA of New Y'ork has come to California to 
spend two or three months and will make her home in Mr. 
and Mis. Charles W. Clark's villa at Pebble Beach. She is 
now visiting Mrs. Richard MeC'reery at Burlingame and was 
the principal guest at a dinner Mrs. McCreery gave Wednes- 
day evening. 

MISS FRANCES PRINGLE gave a dinner Tuesday night in honor 
of Miss Margery Davis, one of the very popular debutantes 
of this winter. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Bush street, Between Powell and Stockton, Sun Franeleoo 
Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLKTHEN, Proprietor 



February 2, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



Mil. and MRS. AUGUSTUS TAYLOR gave a dinner Tuesday 
nijili r a( their home in Van Nesa avenue and entertained 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Lowery, 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles McCormick, Mr. and .Mrs. Roger Lap- 
ham and Mr. and Mrs. Waller Filer. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM W. CROCKER, who have been en- 
tertained at a series of affairs since their return from In 
rope, were the principal guests at a dinner given recently by 
Mr. anil .Mis. William Devereaux. 

MR. AND MRS. JEROME POLITZER were hosts at a dinner 
party on Saturday night, preceding the Sprockets hall, at- 
tending the latter (unction with Mr. and Mrs. George Leib, 
Mr. and .Mrs. Frank P. Deering and William Gwin. 

MISS OLIVE McCORMICK entertained a group of the younger 
set at dinner Saturday evening at her home in town and later 
with her guests attended the dance given by Mr. and Mrs. 
T. C. Kierulff for their daughter. Miss Dorothy Kierulff. 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS GRAHAM CROTHERS were hosts at. 
a dinner party on Saturday evening at tlie Fairmont Hotel. 

MR. AND MRS. C. O. G. MILLER will be hosts at a dinner on 
Wednesday evening. February 6. in compliment to Mr. and 
Mrs. Andrew Welch. The affair will be held at the Millet- 
residence in Pacific avenue. 

MRS. W. S. PORTER will be hostess at a dinner party on Feb- 
ruary 5, complimentary to Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch. 

MR. AND MRS. EDSON F. ADAMS will give a large dinner party 
the evening of the Annual Bachelors' ball, February 2 9th. 
The dinner will be for their daughter, Miss Ellita. As the 
latter gave up the idea of having a formal coming-out ball, 
the family having been absent in New York during the 
height of the mid-winter parties, the dinner party preceding 
the ball at the Jockey Club is intended as a substitute. The 
debutantes of this winter and the preceding, with their es- 
corts, will be the guests at the Adams' party. 

A HANDSOME DINNER, Sunday evening, was that given by 
Mr. and Mrs. William Fries, at the St. Francis Hotel, where 
they make their home. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM ROTH entertained at an informal 
dinner Monday evening when they were hosts to a small 
group of friends at their home in Jackson street. 
DANCES 

GOLDEN JUBILEE BALL will be characterized by dignity and 
social eclat, to be given on the evening of February 11, in 
the gold ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel under the auspices 
of the committee assisting in the celebration of the fiftieth 
anniversary of Sacred Heart College. Three generations will 
participate in the grand march at the ball, the leaders to 
be chosen from the early graduates of the College, followed, 
in turn by those graduating later and concluding with a 
group of the younger set, many of whom will be sons and 
daughters of the first contingency. This return to former 
gala events of San Francisco's society days, when prominent 
families assembled for social concourse is creating consider- 
able interest. Patronesses for the Golden Jubilee Ball in- 
clude: Mesdames Joseph Donohoe, Edward Eyre. John Hanify. 
Eleanor Martin, John J. McDade. W. J. Ruddick, Bartley 
Oliver, Frank Silva. Warren Shannon. Fred Murphy, Rich- 
ard Doyle, Frank S. Kelly, Matthew Brady. Arthur Conlin. 
John O'Toole, Ralph de Cebrian. Plait Kent. D. C. Heger, 
Joseph Costello, R. P. Merillion, .Daniel Ryan. J. Emmett 
Hayden, August Conte Jr., T. J. Shea. Charles McGettigan, 
R. P. Oliver, Reginald Oliver, Reginald Jenkins, Theodore 
Rethers, E. Raymond Murphy, .lames F. McCue, and the 
Misses Mary Fay, Florence Olson. Elizabeth Myrick, Claire 
Fitzgerald. 

MISS LEITA NELSON, who is the house guest of Mr. and Mrs. 
Roy Bishop, and Miss Josephine Drown, who recently an- 
nounced her engagement to Mr. Jerd Sullivan, shared the 
honors Wednesday evening at a dinner dance. The parly wlis 
enjoyed by a large group of the younger set and took place 
at the home of Mr. anil Mrs. Bishop. 

MR. HOWARD SPRECKELS announced at the ball given last 
Saturday night by Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Sprockets for the 
debut of their daughter, Miss Claudine Spreckels. that there 
would be a. dance given by I wo of the Ziegfeld Follies girls 
of New York anil then two \oung women appeared dressed 
alike in while. Huffy costumes of tulle made with petal skirts. 
Mrs. William Shuinan and Miss Eleanor Spreckels were the 
girls. They gave a charming dance and it was several min- 
utes before they were recognized. 

IN TOWN AND OUT 

MRS. LURLINE SPRECKELS EDDY has arrived in New York 
From her home in Paris and will spend the remainder of 
the winter i hen Slu was recently a luncheon hostess at the 
Marguery and had among her guests Miss F.lsie de Wolfe. 
Miss Eugenie Ladenburg and Marquise de Somml Picenardi. 



MRS. WILLIAN I. Kill returned Wedn.-sday from He- Hawaiian 

u!. mils, where she has been since before Christmas, Mrs. 
Leib has I d visiting her family in the islands. 

MISS EMILY. CAROLAN has come up from San Maleo and has 
taken apartments at the Hotel Fairmont for an indefinite 
period. 

Miss MERRILL JONES is the guest of Miss Caroline Madison 
at the Madison home at Stanford Court. 

Ml!. AND MRS. GEO. TYSON will leave in a few days for Hono- 
lulu, and will he gone three or four weeks. Mr. Tyson has 
been working strenuously for some time, and has earned bis 
vacation. 

MR. AND MRS. HAROLD CASEY left Tuesday for a visit of sev- 
eral weeks in the East and the South. En route to New 
York they will spend several days in Chicago, where they 
will be the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas R. Symington 
of Baltimore. 

MR. AND MRS. LLOYD TEVIS arrived in San Francisco a few 
days ago from their ranch at Bakersfield. They are the guests 
of Mrs. Tevis' uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Edward L. 
Eyre, at their residence in Pacific avenue. 

MISS YSABEL CHASE, who left here a fortnight ago, is at 
Palm Beach, where she is the guest of her uncle, Mr. Addi- 
son Mizner, and her brother, Mr. Horace Blanchard Chase Jr. 

MRS. JAMES V. COLEMAN has taken apartments at the St. 
Francis and expects to pass the remainder of the winter 
there. Her son, Mr. James V. Coleman, has entered board- 
ing school at Belmont. 



THE DYNAMIC OF COLOR 

"Does your costume in its color expression 're-present' you, — 
or does it 'create' you? Is it merely a 'self expression of what 
you are, or has it a meaning aside from your own personality? 

"This same inquiry may be made concerning the use of color 
within the home. Does it call forth the fullest of what you may 
become? If the color within your costume 'creates' you, draw- 
ing forth from your physical appearance and personality latent 
powers, then the dynamic of color is being realized, and within 
realization lies achievement. Y'ott and your home may therefore 
be humanized through function-alized color." 

Such were some of the pertinent paradoxes that were presented 
by B. Northcott Helph in the second of the series of studio 
studies in the "Vital Relationships of Color" given last Mon- 
day evening in the Galerie des Beaux Arts, 116 Maiden Lane, 
under the sponsorship of Beatrice Judd, promoter of the Galerie 
and its program of socialized study. Color Interpretation in 
Dress, Color Interpretation in Drama, and Color Interpretation in 
the Decoration of the Home, are taken up at 4:30, at 6:00 and 
at S:00 respectively, on Monday evenings. 

DEL MOXTE 
MRS. HERMAN B. DURYEA of New York has taken the Italian 
villa of Mrs. Charles W. Clark at Pebble Beach for a month. 
During the Pebble Beach Women's Golf Championship Mrs. 
Duryea will have as her guest Miss Marion Hollins, who 
originated the tournament. While at Pebble Beach she is 
devoting much of her time to the golf course and the sad- 
dle paths. 
MR. AND MRS HENRY SAGE of Albany. N. Y.. and their two 
children are spending the winter at Del Monte Lodge on the 
recommendation of their friend. Elihu Root, who stayed 
some time at the lodge last winter. 
MRS. J. HUDSON POOLE and family of Pasadena, who have 
spent most of the time since last June at their Pebble Beach 
residence, will spend part of February in their Pasadena 
residence, returning to Pebble Beach in March. The Poole 
residence at Pebble Beach is one of the show places of the 
peninsula. 
MAJOR AND MRS. LEWIS CASSELL of London. Hong Kong 
and Cape Town, who have been occupying the Hathaway res- 
idence at Pebble Beach since the beginning of the year, are 
about to leave for China where Major Cassell has large in- 
terests. 
MR. AND MRS. F. C. HILLARD of Reno. Nevada, who spent 
most of last year at Del Monte, have returned for the win- 
ter. 
MR. AND MRS. W. HOUGHTELING of San Francisc are spend- 
ing several days at Del Monte. 




HOMES 



READY to ERECT 
on Your Property 



$300up 

SIMPLEX UNIT CONSTRUCTION CO. 

loo I lib street, San Francisco 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 2, 1924 






financial; 



By P. N. BERINGER 

THE general business situation is very good but, as far 
as California is concerned, we may as well say. right 
now, unless this continued and beautiful fair weather ceases, 
we are going to have terrible crop failures for the year 
1924. The failure of the hay crop alone would be a great 
calamity to the state, but when nearly every other crop is 
threatened with failure because of the lack of precipitation 
of moisture, we may look for a year of high prices, in nearly 
everv commodity, having its origin on the land, and high 
prices in every manufactured article is sure to follow. The 
hinterland feeds the coastal cities and, unless the hinterland 
prospers, it loses its purchasing ability. Let us all pray for 
more rain, continuous drizzling downpours. 

* # * 

The Business Prospects 

If it were not for the calamitous outlook, as to crops, 
1 would be encouraged to the extent to say that business 
prospects never looked better. The whole country seems to 
be right on the verge of a vast business revival. The indi- 
cations are certainly unmistakable and the wave of im- 
proving business conditions should overtake us by the 
month of April. All Eastern economic writers, of any note, 

are agreed the wave is due. and sure to come. 

* * * 

The Banks of San Francisco 

After the very successful year of 1923 the banks of San 
Francisco are. all of them, prepared for the coming of very 
good times. They have strengthened themselves and their 
reports show a better condition now than at any time since 

1914. 

* # * 

Wholesale and Retail Trade 

Merchandising at wholesale and retail is in a better con- 
dition than for six years past and the wholesalers, jobbers, 
and retailers are all of them confident 
ful 1924. 



it a verv success- 



Export and Import Business 

The shipping business has received a great impetus, 
through the improvement which has taken place in the con- 
ditions surrounding importation and exportation of mer- 
chandise. It goes without saying, however, that, in both of 
these branches of business a vast improvement, over pres- 
ent conditions, is possible, and those who are en- 
gaged in overseas trade, and in trade with Alaska, on the 
one hand, and with Mexico, on the other, might, with in- 
tensive study, increase their total business transactions 



yearlv by many thousands of dollars. It is so, too, with 
"regard to Canada. It may be said, without danger of any 
verv great opposition, that we know, as merchants, en- 
tirely too little of the markets it is possible for us to in- 
vade and conquer. 

* * * 

The Wars Abroad 

The condition of war prevailing in certain parts of the 
immense territory of China have, to some extent, prevented 
the spread of trade in a natural way, during 1923. There 
is no one who may venture, knowing anything at all about 
China, to say when the central government, at Peking, will 
have the upper hand with Sun Yat Sen. In addition to 
the establishment of the Sun Yat Sen government, there 
are many smaller schismatic struggles going on. in differ- 
ent parts of China, none of which has any relationship at 
all with the Sun Yat Sen movement. In Mexico the re- 
bellion is being put down as rapidly as possible. This 
revolution was apparently very well organized at the out- 
set, but Obregon is too good a military man for anyone 
to have hoped to catch him napping. In Germany, we still 
have war conditions and the government there is only very 
slowly coming to its senses as regards its suicidal mone- 
tary policy and its stubborn refusal to pay its debts. But 
there, too. there will be an end to the nonsensical and 
criminal actions which have been going on since the arm- 
istice was signed. 

Real Estate and Building 

The sales of realty continue right along through the 
winter, and if the promise is kept of a wonderful year in 
sales, it may be just as easily predicted that the building 
record for 1924 will eclipse any year preceding it. There 
is sure to lie a very active market for suburban property 
and building of homes in near-by towns and localities is 
going to go on feverishly, for the whole of 1924. The city 
is extending down the Peninsula, and in Marin County 
especially, we will see building following buying because 
Marin is just being "'discovered" by many as an ideal place 
to live, summer and winter. Oakland never has stopped 
building' and there are more homes planned to go up the 
coming summer than have ever been planned before. 

Mining in California 

Mining in California is coming into its own. with more 
large capital investing than in many years of the past. Old 
mines are being worked, consolidations have been brought 
about and. with modern methods, gold is being recovered 
out of bodies of ore that were supposed to have been 
worked out years ago. Grass \ alley is still the center of 
much excitement and next summer will see verv great 
activity in the old camps about the interesting mountain 

tow 11. 



— Mrs. Ida Hughes of Georgia is sentenced to hang for 
murdering her mother-in-law. Apparently judge and jury 
were bachelors. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter. Just Out 

370 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 1726 San Francisco, Cal. 




Are You 
Particular? 



vsgr^ We offer 

Dining Car Service and Observation 
Cars With Speed and Comfort tor your 
trip to Sacramento and the Sacramento 
Valley. 

For further information call 

San Francisco — Telephone Garfield 64 

Oakland — Telephone Piedmont 345 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R. 

The Scenic Route 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1349-51 Mission St., bet. 9th and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 
Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 



Februan -'. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 



« :: :: ^ x r. :j « n k :: n :_: k k jOs s 8'8aK««K»is'R«8«»»S8S k » 8888888 

STOCKS AND BONDS I 

:; 

By Pierre Berringer 

:: 

„-__ '"' 

:: " i: :: r.x :: it K k « x H x it K k j; k j; st j: » :: it i: v. j; :: a a it :t i: a " ::;:;; jt it it x " :t it 

IN different cities there are, just now, a number of stock 
brokers on trial, against whom have been charged a 
variety of crimes. In other instances promoters are being 
tried lor having attempted, and sometimes successfully, to 
float stock of concerns that have since failed, or that are 
-o near to failure that it may as well be said they are bank- 
rupt. In New York the promoters of the building of the 
largest hotel in the world are face to face with charges, 
from various groups of stockholders who have applied for 
a receivership for the concern, — the Commonwealth Hotel, 
These stockholders will most probably have a return of 
from fifty to seventy-five per cent of their money and they 

may consider themselves lucky at getting that much. 

# * * 

A San Francisco Case 

In San Francisco, for the last month, there has been 
going on the trial of a number of men, associated with one 
Eiseman, in an investment and banking concern. So far, 
it has been impossible to get a jury which would agree to 
send the men to jail, although it is said, that the majority 
of the jurors voted to do so. 

•¥ * * 

Buying Stocks and Bonds 

The buying of stocks and bonds is not, after all, such 
a fearfully risky piece of business to engage in, if one 
uses common sense, and there should never be such enor- 
mous chances for losses offered the public. The great trou- 
ble is that the investor, or rather, in such instances, the 
speculator, takes enormous chances, because he or she ex- 
pects enormous gain. And, when less comes, we hear a 
terrible wail of distress from the disappointed speculator. 
The cure for this is readily found by dealing with a reput- 
able house, that will stand, as far as it is possible, as a spon- 
sor behind the stocks or the bonds sold. There are stocks 
and bonds having a stable and constant value and, if these 
are purchased as investments, should give little care to the 
buyer. These buyers are investors. 

The Speculators 

There are other buyers, however, and these are the spec- 
ulators. The speculators are those who do expect and who 
should expect to take chances, but they are also those who 
tllty on their own judgment and they therefore, according 
to the officials of bond houses, have no business at all to 



hold the bond houses responsible for their losses. 

In addition to the stocks and bonds, which reputable 
stock and bond houses offer for sale, we also have always 
a perfect avalanche of practically worthless stocks and 
bonds, on which it is usually presumed a vast profit may 
he made by the speculator. Sometimes this is true, but usu- 
ally the reverse is the case, and we have many disreputable 
stock and bond brokers who sell just such stocks and bonds, 
knowing them to be worthless, to their customers. Once 
in a while, too, a reputable house will sell worthless or 
near-worthless stocks and bonds, but this happens only 
rarely. 

Xow and ag'ain bond houses may sell bonds or stocks 
which turn out a very bad speculation or investment. This 
happens usually when the directors of a corporation are 
themselves dishonest and have juggled the finances, the 
bonds and the stocks of the company they have misman- 
aged, to their own advantage. 

That is why it is hoped that, whenever the authorities, 
under the spur of the Commissioner of Corporations, or 
some other State activity, gets the hand of the law on the 
culpable promoters, or the bond dealers, and the sellers of 
stock, everyone should wish most heartily that the severest 
penalties may be inflicted. 

Who Gets the Profit? 

The question is so very often asked as to who gets the 
profit in the selling of bonds? The bankers get the profit, 
because it is from the banker the bond-issuing seller gets 
his money. The banker may not sell at par and buy at 
par; he often has to put the bonds on the market below 
par, through a bond house. He must therefore absorb 
enough profit to make the handling of the bonds worth 
while and he sees to it. usually, that it is a worth while 
transaction. The bond houses have been accused, many 
times, of making huge profits on bond transactions, but 
this is not always or commonly so at all. The bond bouse 
charges you a small sum to take care of your business, and 
they may make a slight profit out of the banker as well, but 
the big profit in the transaction finally finds lodgment in 
the treasury of the bank. 

Who Pays the Profits? 

This question is one which should not suggest itself to 
anyone with a capacity for thinking and arriving at sane 
deductions. The borrower pays the profit — in such cases 
the corporations issuing- the bonds. In other words, the 
people who have made such corporations possible, by their 
investments, pay the profits. And it cannot he otherwise. 
Of course, there are instances of frenzied or wild finance 
and the days of that kind of finance are by no means over 
at this time. 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate *>f James Wheeler Riley, deceased No 
3812H, Dept. No. I". 

Notice is 1 1 , ■ , . ■ i . v given by the undersigned 
u .1 Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased, to the creditors 
of and all persons having claims against the said 
<i ident, in Hi'' them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within four i i' nil. inns after the Brsl pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
"I' the Superior Courl of the State of California, 
in and for the Clt3 and County of San Fran- 
cisco, "i- to exhibit them with thi- necessary 
vouchers within four t-t) months after the first 

Publication of this notlOS to the said ailntihls- 

trator, at his office, 868 Phelan Building, San 
Francisco, California, which said last-nan 
fice the undersigned selects as his place ol 
ness in all matters connected with sain estate of 

.lames Wheeler Riley, di ased. 

w. J. HYNES, 

Ailministralnr of the estate >^f 
.lames Wheeler I'.lley. .1. 

i lated S in F nia, January 22nd, 

on. UN \N X- HICKEY, 

Attorneys for Administrator. 5t 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
Estate of August Bod, a. ased, No, 88116. 

Kept, No li 

Xotiee is hereby given by the undersigned, 
w .1 Hynes, administrator of the estate of 

August Bod, deces si I ] I Ltors of a nd 

all persons having claims against the said 
a. ''ii. hi. io Rie them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within four in months after the first pub- 
lication of tins notice, i- of the Clerk 
of the Superloi Courl ''i' the State of California, 
i for tin- City ami County of san Fran- 
"i to exhibit them with the necessary 
■tir 141 months after the first 
publication of Has noli,-, to the said adminls- 

868 Phelan Building. San 
California, which said last-named of- 
fice the undersigned selects as his place of busi- 
1 all matters connected with said estate of 
August Bod, a. - 

W .1 HYNES, 
Administrator of the , 
Angus! Bod, d< 



I »ated. San Finn, 

mil. 
iTl.l.l.NAX \- HICKEY, 

Attorneys for Administrator. 



California, January 22nd, 



NOTICE OK ANM \l. MEETING llf 

■- I (II Midi III U- 

Notlce is hereby given that the annual meet- 
ing of ,i,e stockholders of PATTERSON RANCH 
COMPANY, a corporation, will t.e held at the 

i at ion, to-wit : the "1 directors 

It n." in the building of tin Union Trust Com- 

pany of San Francisco, at the Junction of Mar- 
ket and O'Farrell streets and Gram avenui 

... California, on WEDNESDAY. Feb- 
ruary 13, 1924, at the hour of ten o'clock a. m.. 
for the purpos - d for tie- en- 

suing year and the transaction "f any other 

ss which may properly come before the 
- 

W. w PATTERSON, Secretary 



AXM'AL MEETING OF THE 40MI I \ 
BENDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the stockhold- 
ers of The Joshua Hendy Iron Works 
laid at the office of 

San Francisco, California, on 
12th day of February, 1224, at the 
hour of 10 o'clock a. m.. for the purp 
electing a Board of Directors to serye for the 
ensuing year, ami the transaction of such other 
business as may come before the meeting. 
i'HAS C. GARDNER 
7:> Fremont Street. San Francisco. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 2, 1924 



Pleasure's W^nd 




OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moore- 



Orpheum 

"Senator" Ford from Michigan, dis- 
cussing' topics of the hour with patrons 
of the Orpheum this week, is almost 
as comical as was Henry himself a 
short time ago, when this "manufac- 
turer oi perambulators" — as some 
facetious Britisher dubbed him, — sailed 
in a "Peace Ship" with a dove as a 
mascot. 

Homer B. Mason with Margaret 
Keller, in a one-act play, "Married," 
which is better termed a bedroom 
farce, did some really fine acting. But, 
we must admit, we don't like bedroom 
plays. A scene laid in a bedroom al- 
most always comes dangerously near 
being obscene. We are not insinuat- 
ing- that "Marriage" was any such act ; 
for it was not. It was the sort that a 
Los Angeles supervisor might view 
with equanimity. The only thing he 
might object to was the fact that the 
act ran past the hour of 12. But we 
reiterate that we don't like this sort 
of play. 

A flawless characterization of a man 
fresh from the country, and other 
places south, trying to get "fresh" in 
the city, was given by Pat Barrett. He 
was assisted by Nora Cunneen, and the 
act was called "Looking Fer Fun." 
Contrary to some numbers we have 
seen on the Orpheum stage, the au- 
dience did not have to do the looking. 

Martinet and his crew did some 
novel stunts. R. & W. Roberts, equilib- 
rists, did well as far as these contor- 
tionists go. "Hilliamesques of 1923" 
was a good stab at a musical revue 
with lots of reviewers but not so many 



Adjoining Columbia and Curran Theaters 
Geary and Mason. Phone Prospect 61 



V| 


ffitwt 

hid! 

mm 

— r~fvrT 



Dinner and Cabaret Every Evening 

JACK HOLLAND AND HIS FAMOUS 

BEAUTY REVUE IN LATEST 

SONGS AND DANCES 

RADIANT COLORFUL COSTUMES 

HIGH GRADE ENTERTAINMENT 



revuers. Jean Southern in a self-styled 
"bit of Femininity with a Masculine 
Twist," named on the program as 
"Girls will be Boys," impersonates 
members of the sex she isn't. Raymond 
Fagan and his orchestra were there 
again this week. We won't say any- 
thing more about them. The last 
number of the News Letter contained 
our opinion. And, despite a change of 
musical numbers by Mr. Fagan, that 
opinion remains the same. 



Noted Show Moves to Tivoli 

"Lightuin - ," with Percy Pollack and 
Anne Merrick and Jason Robards and 
everything that goes to make the show 
one of the cleverest and most enter- 
taining that has ever been presented 
in a San Francisco playhouse, is going 
to move. 

But — and most every humor loving 
San Franciscan will emit a sigh of re- 
lief when he hears this — the show is 
not going to leave San Francisco but 
will merely make its new headquarters 
in the Tivoli Opera House, starting 
Monday. Here the rest of San Fran- 
cisco that has not yet seen the play, 
and a good many of those who have 
seen "Lightuin' " already — for it is 
that kind of a show — will come and 
come. And nut until they stop coming 
will "Lightuin' " move on. 



Cameo 

"The Man from Brodneys'," a mys- 
tery-adventure story by George Barr 
McCutcheon, showing at the Cameo 
this week, has plenty of thrills and 
tells the story of a native uprising on 
the island of Japat where an Ameri- 
can falls in love with the Princess of 
the country. 

The action moves fast and the cast, 
headed by J. Warren Kerrigan, who 
plays the American, is well picked and 
does some pretty good acting. Alice 
Calhoun is the Princess and she takes 
her role well. Wanda Hawley, one of 
the heirs, acts well and looks very 
pretty — as Wanda usually does. 

A new series of the popular "Leath- 
er Pushers" followed with Billy Sul- 
livan in the leading role. 

For the week of February 3 the 
Cameo will present Hoot Gibson in a 
fire thriller, "Hook and Ladder." It is 
said that this picture is one of the best 
of it's kind ever produced by Univer- 
sal Studios. Pretty Mildred June is 
the heroine. 



Casino 

The Prince of Pilsen at the Casino 
Theater is a mixture of comic opera 
and musical comedy. The handling- of 
a part like "Hans Wagner" the Cin- 
cinnati Brewer, throws the principal 
comedians of light opera out of gear. 
Mr. Hartman shows his long training 
in the present opera, is as thorough as 
ever, but proves to better advantage 
in King Dodo and Wang. "Arthur St. 
John Wilburforce" is beyond the ex- 
perience of Thomas O'Toole. John 
Van, as "Carl Otto," the Prince of 
Pilsen, fills the requirements of prin- 
cipal juvenile. Harriet Bennett is again 
faithful to the sentiment of her role. 
She sings well and demeans herself 
with grace. Lavinia Winn is always a 
good actress, while Dixie Blair was a 
delight. As "Sidonie," the French 
maid, Hazel Wilson is drowned in the 
accent. The book of the Prince of Pil- 
sen is somewhat stale. The music 
bears this piece up. though it is 
a bit sentimental. 



Strand 
"The 

the attraction at the Strand Thea- 
ter for the week ending February 1, 
is a picturization of everything that the 
title implies in which Barbara La Marr 
wears some wonderful clothes. Olive 
Berry is also starred in the production. 



Warfield 

Sol Lesser will present at the War- 
field beginning Saturday evening, his 
late>t visualization of one of the must 
popular of all the Herold Bell Wright 
stories, "When A Man's A Man." The 




WEEK. 

FEBRUARY 16--23 

Visitors to the Auto Show are cordially 
invited to make Hotel Plaza their 
headquarters. Every essential to perfect 
comfort.and asplendid program of en- 
tertainment, has been provided. 



w o -r tr i_ 

PLATA 

POST STREET AT STOCKTON 



SAN FRANCISCO 



February 2, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



scene taken is in Arizona, the type oi 
western drama that American movie 
audiences so well like. The cast is 
headed b) John Bowers, Marguerite 
De La Mott, Robert Frazer and June 
Marlowe, while Eddie Cline is the di- 
rector. 

In conjunction with the feature pic- 
ture there will be the Fanchon and 
Marco "Ideas." a type of entertainment 
that has brought the Warfield theater 
to the attention of the entire country. 
George Lipschultz and his Warfield 
Music Masters will be heard in a con- 
cert of popular and classical numbers. 

< Ither attractions of interest coming 
to the Warfield in the near future are 
Mae Murray in "Fashion Row," Bert 
L\ tell, Barbara La Marr, Lionel Barry- 
more and Richard Bennett in "The 
Eternal City." Ramon Navarro in the 
Fred Niblo production of "Thy Name 
is Woman," and Owen Moore with 
Sidney Chaplin in "Temporary Hus- 
band." 



Symphony Popular Concert 

An unusually fine musical offering 
has been prepared for the fourth popu- 
lar concert under Municipal auspices 
of the San Francisco Symphony Or- 
chestra, Alfred Hertz Conducter, to 
take place at the Exposition Auditor- 
ium, this Tuesday evening, Feb. S, at 
8:20 o'clock. In addition to a carefully 
chosen program, the guest soloist will 
be Josef Schwarz, probably the most 
interesting baritone before the public. 
I lis success with the Chicago Opera 
Company, two seasons ago, when he 
sang- Rigoletto here, is well remem- 
bered. Schwarz has often surprised 
his concert audiences when, in response 
to an encore, he has stepped to the 
piano and accompanied himself. He 
will sing, with orchestra, the Prologue 
to "1 Pagliacci" and "Wotan's Fare- 
well." 

There is a larger demand for seats, 
which range in price from twenty-five 
cents to one dollar, at Sherman, Clay 
and Company's, than ever before and 
Chairman J. Emmet llaydcn of the 
Auditorium Committee advises all 
music liners to make their reserva- 
tions immediately. 



SAN FRANCISCO 

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Alfred Hertz, Conductor 



Fourth Popular Concert 

(Second Series) 

Exposition Auditorium 

Tues. Eve., Feb. 5, 8:20 

JOSEF 

SCHWARZ 

Baritone, Chicago Opera i •• 

I.I K8T AKT1ST 

Reserved Seals, si. :.-„•. 50c and See 

, \.. War Tax) 

x,,« Sherman, Clay .v 

Dlrectlon Auditorium Committee Board "i 

Supervisors, .1. Emmet Hayden, Chairman 



"The Whitehcaded Boy" at Players 

^~ their sixth production, the Play- 
ers Club are offering Lennox Robin- 
son's charming comedy in three acts. 
"The Whiteheaded Boy, l'he White- 
headed Boy" is the cleverest of the 
comedies produced by the Irish play- 
ers in recent years. It was first given 
at the Abbey Theater in Dublin, and 
then for a full season in London, where 
it had a phenomenal success. The rich- 
ness of its humor, the drollery of the 
situations, and the perfection of the 
playwrighting which it exhibits, places 
it high among modern plays. It repre- 
sents the best work of the author who 
has been proclaimed as another Syngs. 
The engagement opens Monday eve- 
ning, February 4, continuing for one 
week with a matinee on Saturday only. 
The box office of the Club is open dai- 
ly after 1 p. m. and reservations may 
be made either there or at Sherman & 
Clay's. 



A New Stage Company 

The Telegraph Hill Players an- 
nounce that they have secured the 
I'laza Theatre for their first perform- 
ance, which will take place on Febru- 
ary 15, 16 and 17, and will include a 
Saturday matinee. The bill will consist 
of "Countess Julia," by August Strind- 
berg. the great Swedish dramatist, and 
"The Showing Up of Blanco Posnet," 
Bernard Shaw's play of life in the Fat- 
West in the "wild and woolly" days. A 
competent cast has been secured for 
the two plays and rehearsals are well 
under way. 

"While these members are now en- 
gaged in other pursuits, they are glad 
to play with us — not for money, but 
for the love of the best in modern 
drama." remarked Ben Legere, re- 
cently appointed director. "At the same 
time we have a welcome for the tal- 
ented amateur who desires to develop 
his gift. Such persons are invited in 
communicate with us at 1413 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. Phone 
Kearny 1535." 



THE PERFECT MAN 

There i- a man who never drink-. 
Nor smokes, nor chews, nor swears; 
\\ ho hi ■> i i gambles, never flirts 
And shuns all sinful snares — 
lie's paralyzed! 

There is a man who never di 

\ thing that is not right ; 
llis wife can tell just where h 
At morning, noon and night — 
He's dead'! 



"Look, daddy," said a little six-year- 
old. "I pulled this cornstalk right up 
all by myself." "My. but you are 
strong!" said his father. "I guess I am. 
daddy. The whole world had. hold of 
the other end of it. "--Boston Tran- 
script. 



ART IN THE OFFICE 
By Northcotte 

The office of art seems something 
foreign to the hard-headed, hard- 
hearted, practical business man in his 
business office. "Here there is no time 
for the calm contemplation of esthetic 
charms." thinks he; "this is a work- 
place in the work-a-day world. 'Art' 
may be for others, — there — then, — not 
for me — here — now." 

This traditional attitude would re- 
ceive "reverse g-ears" were Mr. Busi- 
ness Man to see the animal pictures 
by the Russian painter, Alexander 
Hrenov, reputed to be the greatest 
"animalist" of Europe since Bonheur, 
with whom he studied. This exhibition 
will continue through February 7th, 
in the Galerie Beaux Arts, 116 Maiden 
Lane (off Grant avenue, bet. Geary 
and Post Sts.) Speed! Action! Ex- 
actitude! Directness! Definiteness ! All 
modern business assets are actuated 
within these unusual hunting scenes. 
Warmth! Eagerness! Vigor! Achieve- 
ment ! Are the emotional reactions in- 
voked ; all hale, hearty, he-man stuff, 
— nothing of the sugar-coated senti- 
mentality that might appeal to the 
feminine soul. The Business Man may 
wish to capitalize the dynamic of one of 
these high-powered paintings by plac- 
ing it in his office. — daily dividends be- 
ing declared. That is the truest office 
of art, — to function, — and it cannot 
function unless it pleases. If you are 
not in the picture-calendar-class, go, 
see and be pleased ! 



"Yes, I have two boys in Hifly Col- 
lege." "What is their yell?" "Money, 
money, money." — Louisville Courier- 
Journal. 



STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 
beginner is Immediately given 
;i role ami productions arranged. 

STUDIO 

.•vk; Kohler & Chase lililg. 

Kearny 5454 



Three Vital Relationships of 

Color 

Dress — Drama — Decoration of 

the Home 

Studio — Studies 

ce "f 

B. NORTHCOTT HELPH 

Mon.Iiv- — ;it »:.t". '■:<"». *:nii 

Galerie des Beaux-Art 
116 Maiden Lane, S F. 
..ff Grant Avenue I 

Quest Attendance — One Dollar 
Beatrice fadd, Bpeasev Po igtoi 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 2, 1924 




San Francisco Auto Show 
The annual Auto Show of San Fran- 
cisco, though not officially designated 
as a National Motor Exhibit, has been 
voted the third most important auto- 
mobile exhibit, and this year it prom- 
ises to be doubly important, because 
the majority of the feature exhibits 
from the New York display will be 
shipped here by express, for the local 
Show. With the idea of securing the 
very latest models and the attendance 
of the big manufacturers, the S. F. Mo- 
tor Car dealer's Ass'n, has set its Show 
dates in February instead of earlier, as 
previous to these dates, it would not 
have been possible to secure the latest 
Motor offerings of the 1924 season. 

Realizing that the public likes color 
in its cars as well as in its clothes, the 
manufacturers have stuck to the bright 
colors of the sport models in their 
closed cars, which have gained in pop- 
ularity. The uniform dead black fin- 
ish for stock automobiles is a thing of 
the past. Colorful cars, blending in 
with the colorful and gorgeous set- 
tings which Manager Wahlgreen and 
his staff have provided, will make the 
coming Auto Show a thing of beauty 
that will even surpass the Show of last 
year. 

Following is the schedule : 

Saturday, Feb. 16th — Opening Day. 

Sunday. Feb. 17th — Bay District 
Day. 

Monday, Feb. 18th — San Joaquin 
Valley Day. 

Tuesday, Feb. 19th — Sacramento 
Valley Day. 

Wednesday, Feb. 20th — Santa Clara 
Valley Day. 

Thursday, Feb. 21st — Society Day. 

Friday. Feb. 22nd — Washington's 
Birthday. 

Saturday. Feb. 23rd — Sonoma Valley 
Day. 



Chairman Toy Outlines California's 
Plans 

State highway work under way and 
contracted for on the Pacific Highway 
in California between Redding and the 
Oregon line, totaled $1,478,000 on Jan- 
uary 11th. 1924. 

This is the answer of the California 
Highway Commission to the inquiries 
of Oregon and Washington about its 
plans for the completion of the Pacific 
Highway, it is pointed out by Chair- 
man Harvey M. Toy in a statement 
outlining just what is being done on 
this northern interstate connection. 

"A lot of misleading and confusing 
statements have been made about 
what we are doing." said Chairman 
1 oy. "and I want to re-assert that Cal- 



ifornia is going to complete the Pa- 
cific Highway as fast as it is humanly 
possible and in accordance with high- 
er standards of construction which 
have been adopted for all work. 

"From the standpoint of actual travel 
into the state, the Pacific Highway to- 
day is California's most important in- 
terstate road. We fully realize that 
only a road of high standards, free as 
possible from curves, can care for this 
traffic which, it is estimated, will reach 
200 machines a day next summer." 

After going oyer every mile on the 
Pacific Highway between Redding and 
the ( )regon line, showing in detail just 
what is needed in the way of straight- 
ening-, grading, widening and surfac- 
ing this road and the cost for every 
unit, Commissioner Toy finishes by 
saying: 

"The road will also be straightened 
to provide a minimum radii on curves 
of not less than 300 feet. Our new sur- 
veys indicate that the road can be 
shortened nearly five miles between 
Redding and Dunsmuir, alone, by the 
work we are undertaking. 

"Pavement of these sections until 
this straightenig and widening has 
been accomplished - would be folly and 
is not contemplated. The road must 
be properly located first. However, 
paving will be pushed as rapidly as 
funds and the conditions of the new 
grades will permit and none will be 
laid less than 20 feet in width. 

"It will take somewhere in the neigh- 
borhood of $5,000,000 to complete the 
job, but when the real facts of the sit- 
uation become known the entire state 
will be demanding that California 
make good promises to her northern 
neighbors." 



Franklin Makes Run, Chattanooga to 
N. Y., in 31 Hours' Time 
While many hundreds of persons at- 
tended the Automobile Show in New 
^ ork this year, it is a safe assumption 
that few, if any. of those who made 
their way to the metropolis by motor 
car equalled the remarkable' perfor- 
mance of J. H. Alday of Chattanooga, 
Tennessee, who covered 947 miles be- 
tween that city and Xew York in 31 
hours, 5 minutes driving time, or at 
the rate of 30.5 miles per hour. Mr 
Alday is the Franklin dea'er at Chat- 
tanooga, and made the trip in a l n 20 
Series 9-B Franklin car. 



Two New Cars 
The forthcoming Princeton car. 
to be manufactured by the Durant Cor- 
poration, to enter the quality class with 
Locomobile, and the new' Eagle car. 
a six of an unusual type, shown for the 
first time this month in Xew York, 
will round out the group of seven lines 
of motor cars deemed necessary to 
meet every demand which also includes 



Durant, Star, Flint Six, Locomobile, 
and Mason Road King Speed Truck. 
In addition to the plants for turning 
out these cars, Durant Motors, Inc., 
now possess, practically completed in 
every detail, a consolidated manufac- 
turing organization. The company 
owns in its entirety the American Plate 
Glass Company; owns all the capital 
stock of the Motor Parts Corporation 
with factories at Syracuse, N. Y., 
Muncie, Ind., and Findlay, Ohio, man- 
ufacturers of axles, stearing gears, 
transmissions, and differentials; and 
controls the Hayes-Hunt Corporation 
of body builders. 



The Colfax Chamber of Commerce 
planning a long way ahead, has ar- 
ranged for a road celebration for the 
4th of July to mark the completion of 
the new Auburn-Colfax unit of the 
Lincoln Highway. The Highway is 
practically completed now except for 
about half a mile near Weimar which 
will be built in the spring. On July 
4th all the paving will be finished in- 
cluding the streets in Colfax and the 
route will be continuous concrete from 
Colfax to Oakland, a distance of 180 
miles. 



Sonny — Hey, mister, have you got 
anything in the shape of bananas? 
Storekeeper — Yes, we have dill pickles. 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

I«2G-I623 Market Street 

Hetween Frunklln and Goarh 
Telephone Park 271 

Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Brofcer 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



Carl Leonhardt. formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 11 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 1 6 San Bruno, Cal. 



C. LALANNE 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 

GRILL 
5 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

OLD POODLE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A $1.25 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m. 

to 9 p. m. 

Also A La Carte 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

65 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Also Beg*ular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 

Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.) 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays $1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 
'Half Dollar" Specials 

(or the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street 



Golden Gate Restaurant 

2721 Hyde St. Phono Franklin «500 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Afternoon Parties a Specialty 
Dance Italian Dinner 




CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



■me ^ 

MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON 
process. , 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coat oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3410 

WHAT BEST SICKVKS THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES TTS 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin 3685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining: to Automobiles 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding: — Blacksmlthlng 

II. W. Culver M- Daberer E. Johnson 



Phone Garfield 3026 



Palmer Graduate 



Hours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Western states Life Building 
905 Market Street San Francisco 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 
Bet. ISth and 19th Sta. 



Telephone Market 64 



San Francisco 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates. ;tBr per day: $7.50 per montli 

PHONE DOUGLAS 243 

Six Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 
MR. and MRS. A. F. C0SGR0VE 



Be photographed this year on your 
Birthday 




all Principal Cities of California 



Oakland 
408 nth St. 



San Francisco 
4 1 Grant Ave. 



Quality 1866-66 Years--1922 Quantity 
Our Service Includes Following- Places: 

Burlinrame Redwood City Menlo Park 
San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market 914 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

Economy Durability 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

Bolts Pressed by Hand. Only — 
Suits Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning* 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 1510 




Reo manufactures 
one passenger car 

chassis. Just one* 

And equips it with 

a 50 horse power 
Six cylinder engine 

Tremendous re~ 
Sources are concen- 
trated to maintain Rpo 
as the Xold Standard 
of Values " 



RcqMotorC 

foe 




Van Ness Avenue at Geary Street 
Phone Prospect 682 

OAKLAND BRANCH 
:?0fi8 Broadway 

BRANCHES 

Los Angeles, Phoenix, Sacramento, 
Stockton 




Established July 20, 1860 







PRICE 10 CENTS ~ $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1924 




LOS ANGELES 



» 



01 



11 



— 




IT I- 1\ THE NARROW HV-W AYS. OFF THE BEATEN K<> M>. (THERE nM. FINDS 
TIIK most AI'I'KII.IXU MOODS AND FORMS OF NATURE 




St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

Pi 
For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk It over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system; it takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 

SPECIALISTS — Extractions Ctowu; 

Self Cleansine Bridges; Porcelain Work 

and Roofless Plates. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

Practice limited to 
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours 10 to 6 — By Appointment — 

Saturday 10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 

Removed to Suite 537 Liebes Bldg. 

177 POST STREET 

San Francisco 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks In California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1923 

Assets $89,174,468.57 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 430,275.37 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haieht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave, and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4H) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation 

General 

Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 



WALTER W. DERR 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 




The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE. TORONTO, CANADA 
Paid Up Capital 115,000.000 J15.000.000 Beierva Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COCLTHARD, Assistant Mana*er 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

Wo will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

817-18 California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



The Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er It be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 
o r stationer t o 
show you samples. 




H.'Uiiim^ijTi^u-i-r 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 185E 
41 First Street - - San Francisco 



OUR service in all phases of Auto 
Livery is backed by an adequate 
organization and over forty 
years of successful experience in busi- 
ness. 




Established 1868 
1623-1631 PIXE STREET 




EiUbllthed July 20. 1656 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. CIV 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1924 



No. 6 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. Russ Building. 235 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 
Calff Telephone Douglas 085a. Entered at San Francisco, Calif.. Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co., 30 Cornhill. E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 ; Canada, one year, $6.00. 

— The news item in a local paper says that marcelling 
of the hair of men has startled Paris. That is nothing at 
all. All you have to do to be properly startled is to watch 
some of the heads of the male contingent at Berkeley uni- 
versity. 

— The British King is a prime good fellow and a splen- 
did diplomatist. He has just raised three of his labor 
members of the Cabinet to the peerage. Nothing like draw- 
ing their teeth. 

— The blizzards that blow in the East and the Mid-West 
are just that much advertising for California's glorious 
climatic conditions. All we need just now to make these 
perfect is rain, more rain, and then some. 

* * * 

— The Berkeley student who was arrested as a peeping 
Tom seems to have excelled in almost everything else. 
He should be punished as severely as possible for his fault 
and be made to contribute regularly to the Pelican. 

■ — Coincident with Doheny's statement in Los Angeles 
to the effect that Standard Oil's price of gasoline was too 
high; that 10c a gallon was sufficient, comes the Teapot 
Dome prosecution; which should give one fond for thought. 

* * * 

— Ghandi, the so-called Indian reformer, has been let 
out of jail so that he may go to the sea-side and recover 
failing health. It is about lime for the sub sisters to set 
up a cry as to how cruel the Indian government is in its 

methods. 

* * * 

— I.ethal gas is to be administered to the condemned 
to death in Nevada and the investigators will watch the 
effects through windows provided For that purpose. There 
is never an experiment of this kind without its attendant 

horrible details. 

* * * 

— Paris decrees that hereafter, until the next change, 
women's frocks will be designed so as to give the impres- 
sion of angel's wings for sleeves. That is a good idea, as 
it is most probable it is as near as must women will ever 
get to wearing the aforesaid wings. 

* * * 

— France, through Millerand, the president, announces 
to the world that she will pay every cent of her debts. 
He also expresses the greatest surprise that people should 
be so forgetful. France has never repudiated a debt in her 
whole history. It is strange that people should know so 
little and soon forget that. 



— Students are again hurt by initiation ceremonies at 
those ridiculous fraternities which nourish in spite of all 
the state regulation. The inherent human snobbery which 
causes these societies to grow, in spite of the law. is the 
hardest thing to overcome. To the anthropologist they 
are amusing; to the decent, they are horrible. 

— Some idea of the meaning of the fall in the pound 
sterling in the past 12 months, amounting to about 40c, 
may be gathered from the fact that, although 30,000,000 
pounds has been paid in respect to interest on account of 
the English debt to the United States, the sterling equiva- 
lent of the debt is greater than it was a year ago; in other 
words, the payments made have been entirely offset by 
the depreciation in sterling. 

* * * 

— So the railroad commissioners are after the Oakland 
traction people and none too soon. Their charges are ex- 
orbitant and their service is worse than bad. We have never 
been able to understand how it is that the street railroads 
of Oakland have had such a political pull and have been 
able to give a minimum of service at a maximum of cost. 
As Mr. Kipling would say, we shall find out when the 
"big black book of jobs" is opened. 

— Let us lapse into sentiment for the moment, and quote 
from some of the sayings in the novel by Princess Bibesco, 
(Mr. Asquith's daughter). "The Fir and the Palm": "There 
is no caress like your own Christian name. The 'beloveds' 
anil 'darlings' belong to everyone, they are the ordinary 
currency of love, blank cheques with changing signatures. 
But your own name, it is a clarion call and a whisper, pro- 
claiming you to the world, and giving you to those vim 
love." 

$ * * 

— Sir Herbert Barker, the famous manipulative surgeon, 
believes that sunlight, if we could expose our bodies to it, 
would eventually banish disease, lie says: "My ideal city 
would be one of very broad streets, flanked by houses in 
which the present proportion of glass and brick would be 
reversed. 'The sunlight, or the pure daylight, would drench 
the city. Disease, I firmly believe, has its strong-hold in 
darkness. Not the clean, healthy darkness of night but 
the darkness of narrow streets, unlighted homes, under- 
ground rooms. Banish darkness and you banish disease." 

* * * 

— Why don't we learn a little from Canada? We are 
here prosecuting decent men under the prohibition amend- 
ment and prohibition officers, who are otherwise quite fine 
men. are driven into impossible and disgusting situations, 

by striving to make a legal enactment work; when it is 
quite outside of human power to make it work. In Al- 
berta they have declared that it is not a misdemeanor to 
offer a drink to anyone. Everybody is sober there, and the 
revenue of the liquor business conducted by the state re- 
duces taxation. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 9, 1924 




"Know ye not that a great man has 
Woodrow Wilson fallen in Israel this day?" asks the Old 
Book in one place, and if we do not 
know this now about the ex-President who has just passed 
away, posterity will know and recognize it. He was in 
many respects a great and almost unique character, and 
when the veil which partisanship has placed over his 
achievements is dissolved by time, the greatness and the 
nobility of the dead will stand out supremely over the 
wrecks of many of those who have calumniated and be- 
littled him. 

There is nothing more deadly to the men of the time 
than a great war. It seems to act as a corroding acid in 
which personalities are dissolved and is destructive of all 
who take part in it. The careers of all those who took prom- 
inent part in the last great war have been interrupted, and 
perhaps destroved. and no statesman remains in power 
today who took part in the debacle. President Wilson 
succumbed early to sickness, and his death is due to it 
as much as if he had actually fallen on the field. 

Yet his achievements in the war were remarkable. He 
was at the head of a people who were utterly unprepared 
for the magnitude of the task which was laid upon them, 
but under his guidance that people created in a few months 
a great navy and launched an army of two millions of men 
transported overseas under circumstances of remarkable 
difficulty, until finally their deeds of valor wrought such 
a change in the situation that the vistory which a few 
months before was in doubt, at least, became a brilliant 
and decisive certainty. 

At the peace table, he took high ground and endeavored 
to bring about a condition which would have rendered war 
an impossible thing in the future. It was here that the 
trial of his life was initiated. He was too fine and too 
idealistic for the European statesmen brought up in the 
faith that war was an inevitability which could not be es- 
caped. But even here his force was so great that he 
achieved results that might have had permanent effects, 
were it not that the masses of his countrymen were not 
ready to accept his high ideals and refused to follow him 
into the untried experiments which he offered for their ac- 
ceptance. 

But, apart altogether from his war record, the work 
which he carried through for the people of this country is 
really heroic in amount and character. Think of a man 
who could secure in the course of eight short years the 
amount of legislation which is involved in the establish- 
ment of the Federal Reserve banking system, the Rural 
Credits banking system, the Federal Trade Commission, the 
Clayton Anti-Trust Law, and all the vast and intricate 
measures incidental to the maintenance of the war ! 

Then we come to another group of legislative enact- 
ments which are still objects of contention, but which are 
nevertheless matters of great moment, — such as the Eight 
Hour day for railroad employes, the La Follette seamen 
act, the Immigration Law with a literacy test, a new Rev- 
enue Law with great increases in income tax. All these 
together represent a body of legal enactment almost with- 
out parallel in political history, and yet they form but a 
portion of the amount of labor performed by him and do 
not even give a hint as to the toil and the care and wis- 



dom which he displayed in the conduct of the affairs of 
state. 

Then take into consideration all the minor affairs in 
which he was involved, and which are only relatively 
minor as compared with the massive and overshadowing 
bulk of the war. There was the Mexican question where 
he took high ground against the attainment of power by 
assassination in the Latin republics and refused recog- 
nition to a Mexican government which had violated what 
he regarded as essential political ethics. 

Then there were the great measures which were purely 
political in their character, such as the constitutional 
amendments providing for direct election of senators, equal 
suffrage and the much disputed prohibition. 

From every angle the man was colossal, great in his 
achievements and still greater in his aims. He had a high 
faith in humanity and an almost, at times, impatient faith 
in his own ability to gain great human results. It was 
perhaps his impatience in this respect which cost him 
most dearly. A man of profound religious and moral sense, 
he was hurt and affronted at the sneers and gibes of lesser 
men and was too sensitive to the attacks of those who were 
not by any means worthy of his consideration. 

Lloyd George, with that uncanny knowledge of men, 
which has done more for him than anything else, remarked 
very acutely that President Wilson had fallen victim to 
the bites of the political mosquitoes. That is undoubtedly 
altogether true. 

There is no doubt that the genius of the man will tri- 
umph over time and that for many years to come histor- 
ians will point to his accomplished works as evidence of 
a greatness and a sublimity of character which is not often 
met in modern political life. 



Harvey M. Toy is always informing as well 
Important Roads as sagacious, and the two qualities are 
by no means universal in the same per- 
son. Thus in a recent article he points out that the pen- 
insula highway is carrying one of the largest volumes of 
traffic of any highway in the state. This choking of the 
"bottle neck of the peninsula'' which is the only connec- 
tion of San Francisco with the remainder of the state, has 
been a serious problem for a number of years and has 
been increased by a rapid development of population in 
the peninsula as well as by great increase of travel from 
the South to San Francisco. Hence this road has been 
widened between San Bruno and San Mateo and again 
between San Mateo and Beresford at a cost of about $70,- 
000 a mile, and represents the very highest and most com- 
plete development of road building to date. As Mr. Toy 
says, "No matter what other roads may be built, the Pen- 
insula Highway will always be the most important, be- 
cause it passes through a populous district and there are 
no roads in the country with a heavier Sunday travel." 

The other road. The Skyline Boulevard, is one of the 
great scenic assets of San Francisco. It met with great 
opposition at first as it was denounced as "a scenic road 
for tourists and pleasure seekers when the farmers needed 
better transportation." But it has won popular approval 
and is today regarded as a necessity apart altogether from 
its scenic values. 

The second unit of this road was completed about Christ- 
mas time, for about thirteen and a half miles. It is a won- 
derful bit of roadmaking and graded from thirty to forty 
feet wide, surfaced with five inches of crushed rock. 

Mr. Toy makes an admirable report and it should be 
printed in full in every paper. He also insists that the 
Skyline boulevard is by no means only a scenic road. It 
is a main trunk line and should be so regarded. The News 
Letter cannot help congratulating itself in view of all this 
satisfactory progress that it has from the very first been 
an ardent champion of the Skyline boulevard. 



February 9. 1024 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



:: :; :; :: it K/igK k i: ): ;: « k :: j: h :: a k » a « « it it « « k K « it it it k « it « it it » it it « U it 

Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 

g 

:: :: :: :i i! :: :: j: :: :: :■■ :: :: i: :: i; :: ■■: r. ■■: :: :: :: ■■: :t x :: :; :: :■ :: « st i; >7 :: « u k « « ): k » » I! 

Tl ! K man behind your pennies, at least the man back 
of San Francisco's two-penny paper, Cornelius J. Yan- 
derbilt, Jr., has spoken for himself by word of mouth. On 
Thursday night. January 31 st. Cornelius Jr.. before the 
University of Fine Arts Society, at the Fairmont Hotel. 
gave a forty-five minute talk about himself and the Daily 
Illustrated Herald. 

Dr. Gordon, of the Congregational Church, introduced 
the young publisher with rosy speech. The doctor built 
up for him a complimentary bouquet, lifting up hands and 
voice toward the end of his oratory, and said words to the 
effect, "Heboid the grandeur of the flowering- — this, in truth, 
is Cornelius J. Vanderbilt, Jr." At the end he tied it all to- 
gether with a cadenced string of poetry. 

The publisher followed. In voice and manner he was a 
modest violet after his flowery introduction. He outlined 
his success as a cub reporter ; told of the "scoops" he made 
for the New York Herald, especially as to the news for the 
plan of a nation-wide labor strike engineered by Foster, 
the well-known agitator. Foster's wife, it seemed, dropped 
an important paper, and cub Vanderbilt scooped it up, 
beating a hasty retreat for the telegraph office to shoot 
over the wires what the little document contained. It was 
luck after a day's effort to get into the good graces of E. Z. 
Foster. But it could be easily seen from other things that 
Mr. Vanderbilt, Jr., said he had more than good fortune 
to carry him through his first days of newspaper work. 
Apparently, he had a great deal of adaptability for his 
assignments as a reporter. He told of great strides with 
his Los Angeles paper, said his San Francisco efforts were 
meeting with gratifying results, and that the public could 
attend the time when he would have a chain of journals 
over the country, to lie written and edited for the benefit 
of the people. He also made it known that he believed in 
and was working for a better feeling between San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. In fact, his slogan was, a united 
California. 

Dr. Gordon spoke again to say the climax of the evening 
was now really at hand, because he wished to introduce 
James Rolph, Jr. As time was wearing on, the good divine 
reached the apex of his delivery in shorter order than be- 
fore. 

The Mayor also took a roseate view of the New , t orker's 
hopes to emulate Mr. Hearst and Mr. Northcliffe. He men- 
tioned the bridge across the bay, of San Francisco's seventh 
place in bank clearings, which now totaled $8,049,583,000. 
His honor said that with a field like this before him in 
the western metropolis. Cornelius J. Vanderbilt, Jr.. was 
bound to succeed, because of that and the facts that Mr. 
Cornelius, Jr., had brains, was young, with progressive 
ideas, and for the reasons that be was a line youth, good 
to meet and shake hands with on friendly term-. 



Integrity is a vital element in life's make-up. I >ften ig- 
nored, it lives of its own strength. Man might root it 
from his conscience, but not from his consciousness. In 

the insurance investigation at the home offices, New York 
city, about a decade ago, it was proved that the presi- 
dents of certain companies could be dishonest to the point 
of misappropriating the policy-holders' funds with mar- 
velous good face, but the) fell stricken to their beds in the 
scandal of unearthing their actions. These high office- 
holders had not the characters to keep to the line of rec- 
titude; neither had they in their dishonesty the hardihood 



we find among those whom we are in the habit of classing 
as criminals. They could not stand tin' third degree of 
public opinion. A number of officials died, the rest were 
broken in health. 

Is this to be the history of the oil investigations at Wash- 
ington? Can it be asked, judging by dispatches from the 

white city, if the accused are beginning to fall ill? 

* * * 

The human body remains a mystery, despite the won- 
derful strides in medicine and surgery. Paul L. Wine can 
hear after twenty-five years of deafness. He just took a 
nice little 3500-foot nose dive in an aeroplane on February 
1st at San Diego. He did it on purpose, too, but he did 
not know it was going to cure his ears. The doctors will 

say the shock did it. Yes. — but why? 

* * * 

Has Assemblyman Walter Schmidt found a home for 
Mrs, Ella Barrett, wdio is aged and paralytic? Supervisor 
James B. McSheehy says that nobody in Mrs. Barrett's 
predicament ever waits or is refused in big New York city. 
Both these gentlemen are making a fine fight to prevent 
the spectacle of Mrs. Barrett dying from exposure on the 
street. ^ .^ ^ 

A man batted his wife in the eye the other night near 
the entrance to the main library. The woman uttered a 
startled "Oh!" I emerged unexpectedly from the darkness 
of the street. "Here !" I said savagely to the man. The 
fellow looked at me with a pained and bothered expression. 
"She exasperates me so," he protested. I believed him. 
They had been quarreling, and I doubted that instant if 
the man knew wdiat he was doing when he struck his wife. 
Further protest on my part died within me. A woman can 
sometimes make a man bang her. I began to feel foolish, 
quixotic. She said nothing. I moved away, ft was too 
much for me. Perhaps he will strike her again on another 

occasion. Who knows? 

* # * 

Little children beg on the streets, or rather street, of 
Telegraph Hill. They block the way, as you go along, 
asking for pennies. They are the children of Spaniards, 
and are not as poor as their parents were in their old coun- 
try, but it is in the blood and they do it for sport. I had a 
good time at it, not begging but giving, until I stopped 
short of my dinner money. 

Ramsay Macdonald, the labor Prime Minister of Eng- 
land, has a beauty in his face that comes from the thoughts 
of an idealist. No hypocrisy has been proven in him. No 
doubt England waits with anxiety on one hand and great 
hopes on the other to see what Mr. Macdonald will do. 
By the way. G. Bernard Shaw says the much vaunted prac- 
tical business men have bungled everything in England 
and elsewhere. 



S. P. URGES RATES TO ASSIST SETTLEMENT OF 
WESTERN LANDS 

Important action intended to assist land colonization in 
western states has been taken b) Southern Pacific 
pane in taking up with other western carriers associated 
in the Trans-continental Passenger Association a proposi- 
tion to place in effect home-seekers' excursion fares from 
the Middle West to points in California. Oregon. Nevada, 
New Mexico and Arizona. Announcement of the com- 
pany's action was made recently by J. II. I\. Parsons, pas- 
senger traffic manager for the company. 

Southern Pacific proposed to the other carriers that the 
home-seekers' fare for the round trip be fixed at the otic 
way fare plus five dollars, the tickets to be sold on the 
first and third Tuesdays of each month from March to De- 
cember inclusive for parties of 25 or more traveling to- 
gether. Fifteen davs would be the final return limit. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 9, 1924 



Taking the "Con" Out of Conservation 



By Ranger Bill, U. S. Forest Service 



f fTF there's any one thing this country needs, it's Con- 
JL servation with the 'con' taken out of it," said Ranger 

Bill as he hung up the 'phone and threw himself into a 
chair. "Take that call I just had — it was from a club in 
the valley that wants me to come down next week and 
spill a line of talk along that old 'woodsman spare that 
tree' idea — and me riding herd up here on twenty Govern- 
ment timber sales. I wonder where those birds figure we're 
going to get all the lumber we need for the ranches and 
factories and homes in this State, to say nothing of the 
new settlers and new business that's coming in like a 
flood? It's just them kind of well-meaning people that's 
forex er 'spilling the beans,' so to speak, and making it hard 
to get 'the man on the street' interested in this mighty im- 
portant problem. Believe it or not, but about all the or- 
dinary citizen knows about forests and forestry is that 
there's a lumberyard around the corner. 

"Funny thing ain't it. that whenever you start anything 
big in this here country of ours' tain't no time before you 
have a lot of folks that's plumb rabid on the subject, and 
shooting off ideas at all kinds of tangents. That's pretty 
nigh the way it is with this Conservation business, as far 
as natural resources is concerned. Most everyone believes 
in it, and knows it's the right thing to do, but when it 
comes down to brass tacks as to how we're going to do it 
— well, you can get about a million different opinions, and 
most of them is either selfish or impracticable. 

"Maybe you don't get me, but let me give you a little 
example of what I mean by this 'con' business: I know a 
man back Fast, and he ain't no small pumpkin either, that's 
a 99-44/100 per cent pure Conservationist. Cutting a tree 
for lumber, or building a road or trail into some beautiful 
camping or fishing spot in the mountains is sure-enough 
sacrilege in his mind. No. sir, nothing but the pristine 
virginity of the forest for him. But the joke of it is that 
this man owns a newspaper, and a big one. too, that uses 
a whale of a lot of wood in the form of paper-pulp. I bet 
it takes more trees each year than you could find on 100,- 

000 acres of full-grown forest to keep his presses running. 
But it ain't only individuals that kid themselves this way ; 
there's some States that's just as bad. They own large 
forests of fine merchantable timber that's a good bit over- 
ripe, but they won't allow a single tree to be cut — just let 
them fall down and rot, and the people shipping in all the 
lumber they use a couple of thousand miles, and paying a 
nice fat freight bill on it, too. 

"Now I don't claim to know all about this conservation 
of natural resources, like some people, but I've been mixed 
up in the timber end of it coming on to 20 years now, so 

1 can give yon some first-hand facts. Conservation means 
preservation all right, but it don't mean locking up a thing 
so as you can't never use it. We've got to protect what 
resources we've got, but we've got to put them to use, 
too, in a sane and business-like way. And you don't want 
to forget the future either while you're doing it. This coun- 
try needs lumber, gas. fuel ami electricity, and the only 
way you're going to be able to meet that need is by using 
the forests and oil and coal and waterpower. But it's the 
WAV you use them that counts. Take the forests for in- 
stance: you can 'mine' them like coal, and when they're 
gone they're gone, or you can grow them as a crop same 
as corn or any other farm stuff; only, of course, you've 
got to wait a hundred years for your harvest. One means 
timber famine and the other timber aplenty; take your 
choice. The same thing holds true with most all our o'ther 
natural resources, there's a right and a wrong way to use 



them — and mostly we've been using them the wrong way. 

"Yes, I admit it's been pretty hard to get this across 
to the public, but they're beginning to realize it now. Know- 
why? Well, just because the things they've always been 
used to having are getting scarce, and it's hitting them 
in the pocketbook. Oil, coal, lumber and a lot of other things 
the good Lord gave this country are dwindling, and dwin- 
dling fast. Do you think Henry Ford would be investing 
in timberland by the hundreds of thousands of acres if he 
knew he could always go out in the open market and buy 
all the lumber he needed? These are facts I'm giving you, 
not heresay. If you don't believe them, go out and try to 
buy some of this stuff yourself. I'll promise you the "sur- 
prise of your life. 

"No, I'm not a pessimist. I can see the 'silver lining' all 
right, because the people and law-makers in this country 
are waking up. and we're going to save what's left of our 
natural resources. We're not going to kill the 'goose that 
lays the golden egg,' though 1 admit we've had her gasp- 
ing pretty much for breath." 



— Obregon has been on that "victorious drive" for a 
month or so and he is still driving. Mexico must be exten- 
sive, or, maybe he goes back once in a while to mop up. 

111! 



all the 




k. n. 

Market Stree 

llllfllllllllllliillill 



when business 
or pleasure 
takes you 
.Prom home 

Tickets to all points 
East via the route 
of scenic surprises 
including - ' 

GrandCanyon 

National Park 

Tell us where you wantr 
to go and we will sub- 
mit suggested itinerary 

Johnson, Div. Pass. Agent, «01 Market St., or 

t Ferry. Jioth Phones: Sutter 7600. San Francisco 



:!li!!;!!!lll:llllll!llllllilll 



February 9, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




By ANTISTHENES 

(Editor's Note: Antisthenes shows up the foibles of various 
"Men of God" this week.) 

— We suggest the proposed monument to a late presi- 
dent be erected on Teapot Dome. 

— It's not of record that grave diggers or undertakers 
have joined the popular clamor against the ring who have 

been selling fake medical certificates. 

# * # 

— Rev. James Deek, pastor and aviator, is accused bv a 
lady of Madison, 111., of squandering $550 of her money. 
Apparently the Rev. James is a high flyer. 

— Ira C. Sparks, religious enthusiast, in a 23 foot boat 
is sailing across the Pacific for the "land of God." If all 

is well with his immortal soul the chances are he'll arrive. 

# # # 

— There are 2600 cases pending trial in the appellate 
court including 450 "dead" ones that never will be tried. 
Were the judges paid "by the piece" and an eight hour work 
day inaugurated, would old dame Justice incline to tango 

along with a more wicked glide? 

# # # 

— John 13. Rockefeller, Jr., in addressing his bible class 
recently, urged that "love be encouraged until it rules the 
world." A big impetus to the good plan would obtain 
could Johnnie. Jr., persuade Johnnie, Sr., to drop our "gas" 
down a few cents; motoring millions would pretty near 

love John as themselves "and thus fulfill the law." 

* # # 

— Are editors becoming mentally flabby? Newspapers 
seriously publish the fact that the Prince of Wales acts 
just like any human being and that William K. Vander- 
bilt. heir to' $20,000,000. has begun work at $8 a week in 
order to learn the banking business! Say, we're out of the 

nursery ! 

* * * 

— Dr. Donald J. Smith, pastor of the Church of the Xaz- 
arene. recently made a futile plea before Judge Ward for 
Alexander Patterson, a self-ordained minister convicted 
of passing fictitious checks. The pastor claimed Patterson 
hail "seen the light" but the jurist opined it was merely 
"the light that faded" and gave Alexander fourteen years 
in San Quentin to relocate it. 

— A few days ago the $35,000 bathhouse of E. J. Martin 
of I. os Angeles was destroyed by fire; in September he 
was robbed; in October his establishment was robbed; in 
December he was held up; in January his wife died and 
the other day his sister passed away. As he has no prop- 
erty nor relatives left, possibly some optimist will tell him 
things will now take a turn for the better. 

* * * 

-—United States Civil Service Commission announces ex- 
amination for clerks at $900, general mechanics at S720. 
ami teachers at $7oO per year! In commercial marts clerks 
get $1000 up. mechanics, $3000, and lots ,,f "up" and teach- 
ers, $1500 or so per year; if nobody takes these examina- 
tions (and they'd he foolish who would I. does the commis- 
sion fill these vacancies with non-civil service people at 
higher compensation ? Yes. we have no suspicions, but, that 
COULD be done and with resulting mockery of the merit 
system. 



— A "barrage of prayers" for Win. II. Anderson of the 
\nti-Saloon League, accused of forgery, was recenth laid 
down "before the gates <>f heaven" by a conclave of min- 
isters assembled in New York under the auspices of the 
League. Apparently, a counter barrage was laid down on 
high, directed by the redoubtable Saint Paul, who, while 
ii earth directed his fellow saint, Timothy, to "take a 
little wine for thy stomach's sake." As the jury convicted 
Andy, the celestial wets' gunnery must not have been im- 
peded by the prayer barrage. 

* * * 

— President Dohnnann of the Hoard of Education has 
answered critics who have daringly questioned the legal- 
ity of paying for imported Superintendent Gwinn's trip to 
look us over and to be himself given the O. O. He said 
Auditor Boyle okeyed the amount, $214.05, "and that is 
all there is to it." We don't know whether or not, for that 
amount, Mr. Gwinn chartered a section or two for the 
trip, but we do know that each of us less fortunates has 
to pay his own way when out hunting a non-ten thousand 
dollar a year job. and "that is all there is to it." 



ON SHIFTING SANDS 

Former Secretary of the Interior, Fall, Secretary of the 
Navy, Dcnby, Attorney General Daugherty and others in 
high places seem presently destined for the fouled wind- 
ing sheets of political demise; the nation is scandalized; 
faith in our institutions shaken ; democracy again forced 
to trial! And why all this? 

It seems so simple a riddle to solve that most of us, 
though sensing the answer, fear to give it because the solv- 
ing is so apparently simple: Does one hitch a mouse to 
a truck or hope a broken cistern to hold water? Politics 
is the antithesis of big business. The latter inducts into 
positions of trust capable individuals of proven integrity 
in large affairs — men who cannot be USED by elements 
antagonistic to the employing corporation; national con- 
ventions often nominate men whose principal worth is 
popularity, whose ability has been tested only in small 
affairs, whose quality of integrity is assured will encompass 
a rigid adherence to political program. Incidentally, and 
illustrating the system, the vice presidency of the United 
States has come to be known as the burial place of presi- 
dential possibilities, who, otherwise eminently eligible, are 
deemed too intractible for politicians' ends. and. national 
conventions, in the role of undertakers, see to it the ob- 
sequies ordered by the knowing are carried out without 
hitch. In fact, were we inclined to ultra radicalism we 
might grimly relate that, often, the practical way the peo- 
ple might have gotten the ruler of their choice was to 
have assassinated the one they elected. 

Flatly and without prejudice: Are any qualifications, 
other than citizenship, a fairly clean bill of moral health 
and a small measure of local success, demanded of men 
we elect to handle billions and rule millions? We might 
enumerate dozens of presidents ami scores of cabinet mem- 
bers of the pasl who were utterly devoid of prereqi 
logically supposed to be attributes of statesmen. Lacking 
these, and untried in places where temptation is big and 
conscience a weakling, small wonder it is that our rep- 

resentath es succumb. 

And the remedy? We hear much in Favor of party re- 
sponsibility as against direct expression, and, the reverse. 
but in both systems we arc concerned only with the tail 
of the thing — the head and soul are expected to shape up 
to expectations and they cannot; hence national scandals. 
Democracy holds no cure for its own ills excepting the 
temporary expedient of chastisement for the guilty. There- 
after, and. looking for the miraculous to intervene, we again 
start on the vicious circles the incompetent, the nobodies, 
the ambitious, and. again the inevitable. We build upon 
sand. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 9, 1924 




.WVejyou 

' HE^RDIT? 



up again in front of the box-office and, in an aggrieved 
tone, said, "Look here, this is a rotten show. Give me 
back my card." 



— The colonel of an Irish regiment, riding home from 
mass, heard to his surprise, as he passed beneath a tree, a 
voice from above saying: 

"The top o' the mornin' to ye, Colonel!" Looking up 
into the tree, he recognized Pvt. Dennis McCarthy of his 
regiment, a cheerful scamp whose escapades were at once 
the joy and despair of his comrades and his officers. Being 
in a jovial mood, the Colonel returned the greeting. "The 
top o' the mornin' to ye, Dennis." 

"I'm higher up in the world than ye are this mornin', 
Colonel," said Dennis. 

"That s so, Dennis, that's so," replied the Colonel, and 
he rode on smiling. 

On Monday morning, poor Dennis was brought before 
the Colonel, charged with being drunk and disorderly, and 
the Colonel, remembering their previous meeting, looked 
at Dennis with a twinkle in his eye and said : 

"I'm higher up in the world than ye are this mornin', 
Dennis." 

"Tis thrue, yer honor," replied Dennis, "but yesterday, 
whin I was higher up, I didn't take a mane advantage." 

"Then I won't," said the Colonel, grinning broadly. "Case 
dismissed." And so Dennis got away with it again. 

* * * 

— There had been a brilliant company at the home of 
a woman whose husband, while a very worthy man. was 
noted rather for his wealth than for his mental attainments. 

"Well, John," she said, after the last visitor had gone 
and they sat down to talk it over, "it was a complete suc- 
cess, wasn't it?" 

"Yes," replied the husband. 

"Did you. notice Professor Muchman?" 

"He was the man with the bandage around his neck, 
wasn't he?" 

"Yes. You heard him talk, didn't you?" 

"Oh, yes, I heard him." 

"What an astonishing vocabulary he has!" 

"Well, that may lie what it is." said John, doubtfully, 
"but from the way he held his head I thought it was a 
carbuncle." 

* * * 

—Throughout his sixty years of life Septimus Mean- 
wump had never given anything away since — at the a<*e 
of five — he had given his younger brother the measles. 

But today was different. Septimus had just recovered 
from a severe illness, and he strolled along in the cool eve- 
ning air with a beautiful expression on his lined features. 
The memory of his sick days made something stir to life 
in the recesses of his forgotten heart. 

In the darkness he nearly stumbled over a weeping child 
— a girl. "What is the matter?" he inquired, halting. 

The weeping child looked up with tear-filled eves" "My 
10 cents! My bright new dime. I have dropped' it!" 

Septimus dived a hand into one of his pockets and handed 
something to the child. 

"There, little one!" he said. "Take that! It will help 
you — to find it!" 

And he passed on, leaving the child staring at the match 
in her hand. 

* * * 

—The man strode up to the box-office of a certain theater 
and, presenting a somewhat soiled visiting card, asked for 
free admission. As the audience on that particular night 
was a poor one. his request was granted. 

At the conclusion of the first act the deadhead turned 



STREET RAILWAY FRANCHISES 

At the recent municipal election, the present mayor's 
opponent, instead of heeding the voice of the people, ad- 
vocated the policy of postponing- the unification of our 
street railway lines to the remote and practically indefinite 
time when the various franchises will expire, from 1929 
to 1953. 

As the franchises do not expire at the same time, nor 
do the expirations occur over connected or continuous lines 
of track, chaos would ensue, and there would be much 
confusion in street car transportation. Also, when the 
franchises have expired, the city's only way of obtaining 
money to purchase the property would be by bond issue 
and taxation, whereas if the lines are taken over now, 
their earnings can be applied toward their purchase price. 
Again the people spoke and he was buried under an ava- 
lanche of their ballots. 

The people are not unmindful that this matter has lain 
dormant with a committee of Supervisors for one and one- 
half years. They have a right to know why this is and to 
urge immediate action. Mayor Rolph in another statement 
says: "By Jove, the people have shown where they stand 
on municipal ownership! And they've shown that they 
want things done. And I'm going to give them what they 
want." 



SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL MEETING 

It must have been with singular satisfaction that Presi- 
dent Levison of the Fireman's Fund told, at the sixtv-first 
annual meeting, of the vast progress made by his com- 
pany. In the ten vears, since 1914, the gross assets have 
gone from $10.000'.000 to $24,000,000 and the premiums 
from $6,600,000 to $17,600,000, which is a splendid showing, 
considering the years covered in the period mentioned. At 
the annual meeting the following officers were elected as 
directors: William J. Dutton, George A. Newhall, |. li. 
Levison. Franklin A. Zane. F. W. Van Sicklen, Arthur A. 
Smith, Henry Rosenfeld, Frank I!. Anderson, Charles ]. 
Eells, John Marshall Jr., and Fdward I. Fyre. 



— The officials of the Bank of Italy must have been grat- 
ified at the receipt of the check from the Fidelity and 
Deposit Company in settlement of their loss through the 
holding up of their Castro Street Branch. Mr. Guy LeRoy 
Stevick showed the wonderful enterprise of his linn by 
not only paying this loss so that it obviates the necessity 
of it appearing on the banks books, but also by immediate- 
ly offering a reward for the capture of the bandits. The 
books were balanced for the day without showing the loss. 



WHEN YOU ARE OLD 

When you are old and grey and full of sleep, 

And nodding by the fire, take down this 1 k, 

And slowly read and dream of the soft look 
"^ our eyes had once and of their shadows deep; 

How many loved your moments of glad grace. 
And loved your beauty with love false or true; 
But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you, 
And loved the sorrows of your changing "face. 

And bending down beside the glowing bars 
Murmur a little sadly, how love lied 
And paced upon the mountains overhead 
And hid his face amid a crowd of stars. 

— W. B. Yeats. 



February 9, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




TowrMLCrier 



) WHO THE DEWLART THOU. 

'ONE THATWIU PLAYTHE 
] pEVIL.S/KWITH YOU" 

Shakspeare- , 



— At the memorial services to deceased distinguished 
lawyers held in the courtroom of the United States Circuit 
Court of Appeals this week, the son of Curtis 11. Lindley 
presented one on behalf of his father as did also the sen 
of Edward Robeson Taylor. This is as beautiful as it is 
unusual. The eulogies were carried out under the super- 
vision of the Bar Association which already appears to be 
sufficiently representative of the bar to undertake such 
a duty. More and more the professions are beginning to 
take on a guild-like form and the old-fashioned happy-go- 
lucky individualistic method has largely disappeared. Per- 
haps it is all for the best. But organized effort is so apt 
to become merely mechanical. 

* ¥ * 

— We in California are much interested in the tendency 
of the proposed new Immigration Law. This tendency is 
supposed to be in the direction of a confining of immigra- 
tion to the Nordic races. All very well ; we none of us 
want the country overflowing with south eastern Euro- 
peans. On the other hand, in California the Mediterranean 
stock has shown a great ability to handle enterprises that 
the Nordics could not have touched. It would be impos- 
sible to disregard the work of the Italians, for example. 
When one considers the artichoke industry and other forms 
of gardening which have risen from the patient efforts 
of the Italians, we can hardly approve of legislation which 
would practically exclude them. 

* * * 

— The public services on behalf of the late President 
Wilson were marked by a Catholicity which was very re- 
freshing. It was made, as it should be. a service in which 
all people could join without any feeling of strangeness. 
All creeds were well represented. Perhaps it is in this 
elimination of the merely sectional and sectarian that we 
shine most in our public life here. We have without ques- 
tion reached a point where mutual charity abounds, in 
matters of faith. Of course the professional grouch can 
criticize even this, on the ground that it is merely evidence 

of carelessness. Let him grouch. 

* * * 

— Everything helps, and even the Russian revolution 
which sent the cultured packing, has come as a boost to 
American art. The Russian artists here. — and there are 
quite a number of them. — have formed a club to stimulate 
each other and we shall have as a result an undoubted de- 
velopment of art in this community. It was the exiled 
Flemish weavers that put English weaving ahead of that 
of the rest of the world. Exiled artists may do as much 
for our art, which really needs something to help it along. 

* * * 

— It is quite a feather in the cap of the slate university 
that C. H. Levermore, who was formerly an instructor 
there, has won the $100,000 prize for the Bok peace plan. 
At least he has collected $50,000 of it and it is more than 
doubtful if he will get the rest as it depends upon Con- 
gress accepting it. Between ourselves the plan is just 
woozy enough to have been fathered by a university pro- 
fessor. 

* * * 

— hake movie schools take thousands of dollars, says 
the press. We don't wonder. Fake anything do(.-s the same. 
Even fake religion is not without return-. There is some- 
thing in the human which prefers fake. Perhaps it is that 
the genuine is too unutterably simple but. more likely, it 
is too expensive. 



— There is the dickens to pay about the naval base at 
Alameda and now that the personal fight has occurred 
between Congressman Curry and "Sunset" we may expect 
some revelations. But really the matter was not well man- 
aged and the greed of certain Oakland people, who should 
really have known better and have covered themselves more 
completely, is to blame for the episode. Curry, however, 
is a poor controversialist and his come-back is of the weak- 
est. However, the more they talk, the more we shall learn. 
* ' * * 

— Gen. Norton P. Chipman, who died recently at the 
age of eighty six and who was presiding justice of the 
Third Apellate District Court, was an intimate friend of 
Lincoln, and heard the Gettysburg address. His death 
makes a definite break with that portion of our past, as 
far as we can discover. Gen. Chipman was a delightful 
companion and a charming ranconteur. These are qualities 
which grow scarcer nowadays. What shall we blame for 
that? 

— We note that there is pending in the courts a dispute 
as to the inheritance tax, the state claiming a greater 
amount than was awarded by the superior court. The 
whole inheritance-tax question has seemed to us somewhat 
confused, and it is time for every reason that this should 
be remedied. 

— The bank clearings of San Francisco show a condi- 
tion of business which is almost scandalous, for prosperity. 
If our industrial leaders were as religious as the ancients, 
they would sacrifice something, for the luck is ominously 
good. Let us hope that the Community Chest prospered 
accordingly. 



"GRIZZLIES" WILL HOLD REUNION 

The 144th Field Artillery, known as the "California 
Grizzlies." will hold the reunion and banquet of the regi- 
ment on Saturday. February 23rd. 

An executive committee has been selected and organized 
with headquarters at 862 Mills Building. San Francisco. It 
is actively at work sending out notices and planning ar- 
rangements for making the reunion a notable event. 

This regiment was composed of volunteers who came 
from throughout the entire State of California. Already 
word has been received by the committee from men in the 
furtherest parts of the state, expressing their enthusiasm 
and intention of attending. The committee are arranging 
not only special features for the banquet, but also plans 
for the entertaining, during their stay, of the "Grizzly" 
veterans in the city. 

The executive committee are composed as folio 

General Thornwell Mullally. chairman; Wm. G. Deve- 
reux, treasurer: C. A. Burgess, secretary; J. J. Graves, 
Grover Tracy. 1.. J. Scott. I.. M. Lyons. Al Santell, Walter 
Kennedy, Dudley Sweeney, Edward Hearne, Sam M. Mark- 
owitz. Chester T. Pringle, Wm. Guthrie, Richard Tatham. 

Efforts are being made by General Mullally. former col- 
onel of the regiment, to locate and notify every member of 
the regiment. 



HOTEL 

St. FRANCIS 

Dancing During Tea 

Mondays Four to Six 

Rooms for Mah Jongg and Bridge Parties on Reservation 

Without Charge 

Management Thos. J. Coleman 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 9, 1924 






financial; 



By P. N. BERINGER 

THE Commission, which is just now investigating the 
ability of Germany to pay reparations, has. apparently, 
made the discovery "that Germany should "control the 
Ruhr region and the Rhineland" in order to help out in 
paving the reparations debts. It was not necessary to send 
the Forceful Dawes and his associates abroad to come to 
that conclusion. It was exactly on this necessity the French 
and Belgian statesmen counted when they occupied the 
Ruhr, and such part of the Rhineland as they deemed nec- 
essary, to enforce their demand for payment. Long ago 
Germany could have taken the initial steps toward having 
the Ruhr and the Rhineland returned to her. but she never 
has shown any disposition to deal frankly and squarely 
with France and Belgium. 



The Mexican Revolution 

As predicted in this column, the revolution, engineered 
by De la Huerta and his associates, has been very nearly 
snuffed out by Obregon. The De la Huertistas are about 
to evacuate Vera Cruz, if they may. After the big body 
of troops, under De la Huerta at Vera Cruz, has been en- 
tirely subdued there will remain many bodies of bandits. 
in various parts of the country, to drive to a last stand. It 
will take some months before we may say that Mexico is 
entirely at peace with itself. Then, let us hope that the 
world merchandisers of this country will invade Mexico 
to such an extent with their wares that another revolt will 
be made impossible in the years to come. Let us also hope 
that the spread of a vast public school system will help 
to bring this permanent peaceful condition about. 



oust the Republicans and place the Democrats in power 
would be bad for an improving general condition. 



The Teapot Dome 

It has certainly been much more than a tempest in a 
teapot in Washington recently and if the administration 
outrides the storm successfully it will show wonderful 
leadership in Mr. Coolidge and his managers. 

It was clever, in the usual bungling of things by the 
Democrats, that they should have used this Teapot Dome 
matter as presidential campaign material. It was as un- 
usual as it was unexpected. Yet the scandal is not a po- 
litical matter at all. It is simply one of those terrible abuses 
of power, used for selfish ends, which might happen in 
any administration of national affairs and it is the simplest 
of the duties of the President and the authorities to see 
that, if there has been criminal action, that the criminals 
are punished. Such occurences do not tend to improve 
business conditions and a political shake-up that would 



Had a Big Following 

Thomas Woodrow Wilson is dead and thousands in the 
country mourn his passing as that of a dearly beloved friend. 
Mr. Wilson was a very forceful sort of man and, in the 
short years of his public life, managed to leave an ineradic- 
able impress of having lived on the nation. Just now the 
newspapers are full of laudation of the most extraordinary 
kind. I wonder how history will treat the man, a little 
later on, when it is really written. 



The Shipping Board 

And now it turns out that the Shipping Board is not 
at all divorced from the Emergency Fleet Corporation. We 
had been hugging- the belief to ourselves that the Fleet 
Corporation would have a free hand in the operation of 
the vessels of the Board but that now is only to be expected 
in an "executive" way. The Shipping Board, with its poli- 
ticians and its satellites, is still the great big power and 
the Fleet Corporation officials simply have the say as to 
shipping officers and as to sailing dates, etc. The Shipping 
Board will go right on existing- and. as far as we now know, 
will dictate the main policies as to Uncle Sam's mercantile 
marine. 



Remember the Date 

March the fifteenth is the fateful day on which your in- 
come tax return should be filed. Remember, too. that de- 
ductions for bad debts and contributions may form a con- 
siderable portion of the deductions, but you should also 
bear in mind that these bad debts may only be deducted 
for the year in which they are ascertained to be worthless 
and charged off the books of the taxpayer. The returns 
must show also the manner in which the debts were ascer- 
tained to be worthless. Unpaid loans to relatives and 
friends, which it is not expected will ever be repaid, should 
be looked upon as gifts. 



The Banks 

The business of establishing branch banks has had a 
set-back and. from now on, we may expect to see much 
less branch bank expansion. It is probably a good thing 
that there is a lull in the expansion business. There is 
such a thing as going too far in the direction of establish- 
ing bank branches and the move by the Federal govern- 
ment against this sort of thing is looked upon, by conser- 
vative bankers, as being in the right direction. 



The Golden Gate Bridge 

Mr. J. 1'.. Strauss, the well known Chicago engineer, and 
Mr. W. T. Ilotchkiss. the President of the Bridging the 
Golden Gate .Association, have been hobnobbing together 
and going over the details of the bridge building. They, 
and thousands of others, are still waiting for the decision 
of the government authorities at Washington. This de- 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining; and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

310 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco, Cal. 




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Particular? 



^§^ We off <"' 

Dining Car Service and Observation 
Cars With Speed and Comfort tor your 
trip to Sacramento and the Sacramento 
Valley. 

For further information call 

San Francisco — Telephone Garfield 64 

Oakland — Telephone Piedmont 345 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R. 

The Scenic Route 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1349-51 Mission St., bet. 9th and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 
Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 

Specialty 



February 9, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



cision will not be long in being ami' aunt.. 1. and, when once 
known, the work will .tr< ■ with a bang. Mr. Strauss saj 3 
the twenty-one million dollar structure will be finished with- 
in four years. When completed it will be the ver) biggesl 
and most effective advertisement for California and San 
Francisco that ever was devised. 



Those Business Conventions 

We have just had in San Francisco the meeting of the 

Western Division of the United States Chamber of Com- 
merce and this has meant that some of the wisest busi- 
ness men in the world have come together for discussion. 
Xow. we have the furniture men and women in convention 
for Market Week. These five hundred men and women rep- 
resentatives come from fifteen states and from Hawaii, 
Canada, and Mexico. The Fire Underwriters to the num- 
ber of five hundred are meeting this week, at the Merchant's 
Exchange. San Francisco is fast becoming- the greatest 
convention city in the country. 



It is quite astonishing how well stocks and bonds hold 
up in the market. It is the very best indication of the be- 
lief, by the mass of investors and speculators, of a great 
prosperity ahead. 

In the midst of this prosperity the business man and 
others should not forget to make returns. Remember that, 
in making out your return, you may deduct from gross in- 
come all losses, incurred not only in business, trade or pro- 
fession, but in any transaction entered into for profit, not 
compensated for by insurance or otherwise. Losses sus- 
tained in operating a farm are deductible. 



OF A FAMILY TREE 

No one has chronicled the genealogical succession of 
the oldest and everlasting dynasty: that of Pater Meda- 
ciorum ! The first liar on record was Satan, who, in vamp- 
ing Eve into partaking of the forbidden fruit, exuded as 
neat an array of fabrications as is anywhere related — in- 
cluding a promise to give her the position occupied by the 
Almighty (an unheard-of inducement) — if she would but 
set her dainty incisors into a big rosy apple; Cain was hard- 
ly a logical successor to Lucifer as his "Am I my brother's 
keeper?" was cowardly evasion rather than downright 
falsehood; next came Annanias, model of modern grafting 
liars, but one lacking tenacity in clinging to his story; then 
Baron Munchausen who flourished in the sixteenth cen- 
tury and who was considered regal because of the divers- 
ity of his prevarications. 'Twixt the Baron's time and our 
day, numerous minor liars, including world-war propagand- 
ists, unfit to be classed as royal,- but who preserved the 
line of succession intact until a popular coronation could 
obtain, came in interminable train until we were brought 
afoul of that peer of whoppers — Dr. North Pole Cook! 
Under his reign the dynasty was elevated to the zenith 
of sustained hokum, when, unexpectedly, the crown was 
snatched away by another member of the same legitimate 
issue, to wit, former Secretary of the Interior. Fall! Pres- 
ently, there is spirited contest on to decide the lawful heir 
as between Fall and Anderson, secretary of the Anti-saloon 
League, but, you can never tell — perhaps it is neither of 
tlusc two; possibly it's an unsuspected flower blushing 
somewhere unseen in the shadow of Teapot Dome! Who 
knows? 




HOMES 



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on Your Property 



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106 11th Street, San Francisco 



Manufacturing Comfort 

is the pleasant task of the 

P' G' and E- 



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stretches its tireless arms across arid 
wastes, harnesses streams and makes light, 
power and convenience responsive to the 
touch of your finger. 

It fashions huge tanks, lays pipe, makes 
gas — and carries heat to the home, or in- 
dustry 

With courteous grace it supplies power 
to assist Mi-lady with housework. Its 
brawny strength propels speeding trains, 
whirls massive wheels of factories, and helps 
the farmer in his toil. 

In its service to housewife, rancher, man- 
ufacturer and merchant, it performs many 
remarkable feats. Transporting 220,000 volts 
of electricity at one time, for the great dis- 
tance of 208 miles, is but one of several 
achievements that have brought fame to this 
Company. 

The P G and E assures comfort for you 
and makes it attainable at low cost. Health. 
happiness and progress arc dependent upon 
the fidelity with which it serves. 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 

p. Q. and £ • 

"PACIFIC SERVICE" 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 9, 1924 




busy cvrm 

MISS HARRIET POMEROY and Thomas A .Thatcher ^ will M>e 
married on March 4 at the home of the bride s rnomer, m« 
Carte. PPomeroy. in San Rafael. It will be a simple wed- 
ding with no attendants. The young couple plan a home in 
^lSTi T^rEiiicisco 

THE MARRIAGE OF MISS BYRNES and Mr Fabian McCarthy 
will be celebrated at high noon on March 1. The Misses 
Kathleen and Gertrude Byrnes will be the bridesmaids at 
their Aster's wedding and Mr. McCarthy's brother, Mr. John 
McCarthy, will be the best man. 

MISS GEITRITDE BANGS, the daughter of Mj-^Mr^ Frank- 
lin Bangs of Oakland, was married to William Shaw at a 
metty wedding at St. Paul's Church in Oakland Wednesday 
eveniu" Miss Pauline Wheeler was maid of honor. Clement 
Gray acted as best' man, and the ushers were Geoffrey Bangs, 
a brother of the bride, and Ralph Clark of San Francisco. 
The young couple will make their home in San Francisco 
upon 'returning from their wedding journey to Europe. 

MISS HELEN JACKSON, the daughter of A. C. Jackson of San 
Francisco, has chosen February 12 as the date of her mar- 
riage to Paul Young, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Alex Young. 
Th! ceremony is to "take place at St. Mary's Paulist Churc r 
here Miss Gladys Quarre will be the brides only attendant, 
and Alec Young will be his brother's best man. 

MRS ATHERTON MACONDRAY has chosen Tuesday. February 
26 as the date for her marriage to Mr. William Otis Ed- 
mands. It will be a quiet wedding and will be attended only 
by relatives and close friends. 

LUNCHEONS 

MISS MARGERY DAVIS will entertain at a luncheon party on 
February 14, in honor of Miss Frances Pringle, who will be 
married to George MacDonald soon. 

MISS AGNES WESTON, who will be married to John Hamblin 
Threkeld on April 2, was the guest of honor at a luncheon 
party given by Mrs. Robert Wallace Jr. 

MRS J C DRISCOLL will give a luncheon party at the Palace 
Hotel on February 14, and Mrs. Howard Welch, recently 
here from Paris, France, will be hostess for Miss Leonore 
Fitzgibbon on another date. 

MRS. GEORGE BATES, whose hospitality has added so many 
charming episodes to the annals of society, was hostess at. 
a large luncheon party at her home on Sacramento street 
Tuesday. 

MRS. GRANT SELFRIDGE will give a luncheon party on Feb- 
ruary 12 in honor of Mrs. Atherton Macondray, who is to 
be married to William Otis Edmands. 

SIR JOHN AND LADY" MAXWELL spent the week end at the 
country place of former Senator James D. Phelan in Sara- 
toga and were the guests of honor at a large luncheon which 
he gave on Sunday. 

MRS. SAMUEL POND will entertain a number of the debutante 
set at a luncheon and bridge party next Tuesday, February 
12. 

MRS. JAMES FLOOD will be a luncheon hostess on Friday at 
her home. 

MRS. CLEMENT TOBIN, who is spending several weeks in San 
Francisco from her home in New York, was the guest of 
honor at a luncheon given Monday by Mrs. Virginia Ford. 
The affair was held at the St. Francis. 

MRS. FREDERICK McNEAR will give a luncheon on Valen- 
tine's Day in honor of Mrs. William S. Porter, who recently 
returned from Europe. 

MR. AND MRS. ARTHUR ROSE VINCENT were hosts at lunch- 
eon at the St. Francis Monday. The party included Mrs. 
Robert Hays Smith, Mrs. Richard McCreery, Mrs. George 
Cameron, Mrs. Ross Ambler Curran and Mr. De Bias, the 
celebrated portrait painter. 

MISS CLAUDINE SPRECKELS, who was formally presented to 
society last week at a brilliant ball in Burlingame, was with 
her sister, Miss Eleanor Spreckels, and Miss Alice Moflitt at 
luncheon at the St. Francis Monday. 

MRS. BERNARD FORD was hostess at one of the larger parties 
at the St. Francis Monday, her guests including Mrs. James 
Jackman, Mrs. Rennie Pierre Schwerin, Mrs. Harry Hill. Miss 
Lillie O'Connor, Mrs. Michel Weil, Mrs. Orville Pratt and 
Mrs. R. Courtney Jenkins. 



MR. 



MRS. CLEMENT TOBIN was the honored guest at a luncheon 
given Tuesday by Mrs. Milton Bugbee at the Woman's Ath- 
letic Club. 

MRS ELMER JENNINGS entertained a group of friends at a 
luncheon Tuesday at the Town and Country Club. 

AND MRS. WALKER SALISBURY entertained Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Lee of Los Angeles at a luncheon at the Bur- 
lingame Country Club last Sunday. 

MRS BOWIE DETRICK will entertain at a large luncheon on 
Thursday. February 14, when the guest of honor will be her 
daughter-in-law, Mrs. Bowie Detrick. The luncheon will be 
held at the Fairmont. 

TEAS 

MRS. MELVILLE C. THREKELD will give a large tea for Miss 
Weston, her son's fiancee, on February 14 . 

MISS EVELYN GORTON has issued invitations to her friends 
for a Valentine's tea to be given at the Palace on Saturday, 
February 16. Mrs. Thornton High and Mrs. Olaf Lindblum 
will assist Miss Gorton to receive. 

MRS. ADOLPH SPRECKELS will be hostess at an informal tea 
at her home on Monday afternoon. 
BRIDGE 

MISS LEONORE FITZGIBBON, whose betrothal to Brooke Mohun 
was recently announced, was the guest of honor at a bridge 
tea Tuesday at the Fairmont Hotel, where Miss Inez Marion, 
who makes her home there, entertained mutual friends. 

MISS VERONICA BYRNES entertained Tuesday evening with 
a bridge party at her home in San Rafael. Cards were fol- 
lowed by a buffet supper. 

MISS PAULINE SHARP will entertain this Saturday night with 
a large bridge party at her home in San Rafael, honoring 
Miss Katherine Mackall, the bride-elect of Mr. William Ede. 

DINNERS 

MR. AND MRS. CORNELIUS VANDERBILT were the guests of 
honor at a dinner given at the Fairmont Hotel by Mr. and 
Mrs. Geo. McGowan, on Thursday evening of last week. The 
table decorations, designed by Mr. Albert Stein, were espe- 
cially gorgeous, being gold and silver cloth, with orchid chif- 
fon covering, orchid center-piece; baskets of orchids scat- 
tered over it, and gold candelabra with lavendar candles. 
Mr. Rudy Seigar's orchestra played Mrs. McGowan's Tango 
"Milorita"; the same composer's waltz dedicated to Mary 
Pickford, — "Rosita" and other appealing compositions. The 
guests included: Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt, Mrs. 
Vanderbilt's sister, Miss Littleton, Senor Marcus Huidobro, 
Consul General of Chile, Senor Gimeno. of Spain, Mr. Thomas 
E. Collins, Miss Hardy, Mr. Baldwin Vale, Count and Coun- 
tess Baronoff, Capt. and Mrs. Chas. Peabody Huff, U. S. A., 
Mrs. Virginia Sherrer of London, Mr. and Mrs. R. T. Hard- 
ing, and Mrs. Margaret Bruce Beaumont. 

MISS LUCY HANCHETT and Vincent K. Butler, who will be 
married on February 23, were the guests of honor at a hand- 
some dinner dance party given Tuesday night at the San 
Francisco Golf and Country Club. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis E. 
Hanchett, who are enroute home from New York to Mon- 
tecito, stopped over here to attend the party. 

MR. AND MRS. OLIVER DIBBLE gave a dinner party Tuesday 
night as a farewell compliment to Mr. and Mrs. Frederick 
Spencer Palmer, who will leave on February 16, on the Kroon- 
land for Cuba and Florida. 

MR. AND MRS. C. O. G. MILLER gave a dinner party Tuesday 
night in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Welch at their home 
on Pacific avenue. 

MRS. ELEANOR MARTIN entertained Sir John and Lady Max- 
well informally at dinner on Saturday evening, when the 
guests included Mr. and Mrs. J. Downey Harvey, Miss Mar- 
gery Davis, former Senator Phelan and Mr. Charles Oelrichs 
Martin. 

COLONEL AND MRS. ALBERT E. TRUBY will be honor guests 
at an elaborate bridge dinner planned for February 11 by 
Captain Charles W. Henderson of the medical corps and Mrs. 
Henderson. The affair will take place at the Hotel Whit- 
comb. 

MRS. RICHARD McCREERY gave a dinner Tuesday night for 
Sir John and Lady Maxwell at her home in Burlingame. The 
Marchioness of Donegal was another distinguished guest at 
the dinner. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 rju.sli Street, Between Powell and Stockton, Sun Francisco 
Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



February 9, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



MR. LATHAM McMULLIN was bosl to a little group o£ friends 
at dinner Monday evening, when be entertained Mr. and Mn 
Charles R. McCormick, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth it. Kingsbury 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Eddy and Mr. and Mrs. Julian Thome 

The dinner party was given al the Hotel St. Francis, and 
the host and his guests later attended the theater. 

MR. AND MRS. WARREN SPIEKER entertained at dinner Men 
day evening at their residence in Buchanan street when the 
li jts of honor wen- Miss Josephine Drown and ber fiance. 
Mr. Jerd Sullivan. 

THE LAST MEETING of the winter of the Dinner Club occurred 
Monday night at the Bohemian Club. There was a dinner 
and afterwards man jongg, bridge and dancing. 

MR. AND MRS. LORENZO AVENAL] were hosts at an informal 
dinner given a few evenings ago at their home on Russian 
Hill. Those in the dinner group included Mr. and Mrs. Hugh 
de Haven, Mrs. Adolph B. Spreckels and Former Senator 
James D. Phelan. 

DANCES 

THE OFFICERS AND MEMBERS of San Francisco Branch 
League of American Pen Women will give an elaborate French 
fete on Tuesday afternoon, February 19th, from three to 
six o'clock, in the Gold Ball Room of the Fairmont Hotel, 
in honor of Mrs. Adolph B. Spreckels, one of its prominent 
members. The occasion commemorates the first anniversary 
of the founding of the Legion of Honor Memorial Museum, 
dedicated to the men who sleep in Flanders Field. The Fete 
is also intended to express the appreciation of San Francisco 
intellectuals for the great structure endowed by Mr. and Mrs. 
Adolph B. Spreckels. The Army, the Navy, the Foreign Con- 
suls, City and State Officials, as well as Art and Letters, will 
participate in this event. Women prominent in various walks 
of life will don the wigs and patches of the Louis XV Period 
and be in attendance upon Mrs. Spreckels. Music of the Pe- 
riod and a gavotte in costume by Miss Anita Peters and 
four attendants will close the feature program. Felicitations 
by Mayor Rolph and other officials will also be a part of the 
affair. 

JUBILEE BALL — Youth, beauty, culture and achievement will 
be dominating characteristics of the Golden Jubilee ball to 
be given at the Fairmont Hotel on the evening of Monday, 
February 11, according to the plans of the Woman's Exe- 
cutive Committee of which Mrs. Clarence Musto is the chair- 
man. Miss Marie Comte, one of the younger set, assisting her 
chairman, Miss Noel McGettigan, will have a coterie of 
young friends at the ball. Miss Claire Giannini is also one 
of the charming young girls invited to participate in the 
plans. On Miss McGettigan's committee, the young girls who 
are actively lending their assistance are: Misses Lorene Dyer, 
Gertrude and Irene Barrett, Mary Young, Olive and Harriett 
McCormick, Aileen Brady, t'ecile and Martha Mohun, Helen, 
Madeline and Marie Comte. Many prominent men graduates 
of Sacred Heart College With their wives and relatives will 
act on the reception committee with Mrs. Costello. They in- 
clude: Mesdames J. Emmet Hayden, Daniel C. Deasy, Daniel 
Ryan. Vincent C. Derham, Maurice Dooling Jr., Edward I. 
Barry, Walter R. Jones. A. F. Burke, D. C. Heger, J. M. 
Glennan, John Oughin, George Bernard Keane, Charles Mc- 
Gettigan; Misses Mary Fay. Mary and .lane Jones. Claire 
Carew, Elizabeth Myrick. Claire Fitzgerald. Misses Alice 
and Margaret Doran will also aid the formal reception com- 
mittee. The Golden Jubilee Ball will be strictly formal and 
invitational. Mrs. Joseph Donoho'e beads a committee of 
patronesses for the ball. 

LOCAL KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS are rapidly formulating plans 
for the annual Mardi (Iras celebration of Mission and Golden 

Gate councils "Caseys," to la held Saturday evening, March 
7, at the Exposition Auditorium. Officials and prominent 
members or the Knights of Columbus society, preparing toi 

an event that will serve to assist the new Golden Gate and 
Mission councils in their plans tu shortly erecl modern club- 
houses, athletic headquarters and community centers, in the 
Park-Presidio and Mission districts, decided recently 

Vive the f; IUS U.mli lira . and let it ..nee again take its 

place among the leading social events of the year. Tin- lust 
professional entertainmenl talent from the local theaters 
cafes «iii present their offerings between the dances and 
marches of the Mardi tints festivities. Tickets tor the lug 
function are now en sale al Sherman, Clay & Co., Kohler & 

Chase, and leading business establishments in the Park-Pre- 

sidio districts ol San Francisco. 

IN TOWN AND oil 
Ml!. AND MRS. GEORGE lie LATOUR and their daughter. Miss 
Helene de La tour, arrived in New York from Europe on Sat- 

urday. Thej will return to California Sunday and will go 

directly i I I inch at Ruthei ti 

MRS. WALTER K. GIBSON has returned to her borne in this 
city from San Diego, where she was called on account of the 
death of her sister, the late Mrs. John D. Spreckels. 



GENERAL SIR JOHN AND LAD'S MAXWELL wire among re- 
cent arrivals at the Palace Hotel, proceeding to New York 
and Washington Tuesday. Sir John Maxwell, who was one 
.ii Lord Kitchener's favorite generals, has had a distinguished 

c i. most of which ims I n spent in Egypt, where he 

went through ail of the Egyptian campaigns, lie was chosen 

by Kitchener to be Military Governor of I'rnetoria during 
the South African War. after which he was Chief of Staff 
to the Duke of Connaught until lie returned to Egypt as 
Commander-in-Chief, becoming Military Governor of Egypt 
at the outbreak of the World War. Lady Maxwell was with 
him during till his later campaigns. She was formerly Miss 
Louise Bonynge of San Francisco. 

MRS. GEORGE M. STUDEBAKER of South Bend, Indiana, is a 
guest at the Palace Hotel. She has been sojourning at the 
Hotel Del Monte since coming north from San Juan Capi- 
strano where she attended the wedding of her brother, Mr. 
William Lant and Miss Viola Van Derlack. Mrs. Studebaker 
will return to her eastern home within a few days. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM GREGORY PARROTT left on Fri- 
day for the Parrott ranch near Chico, where they will en- 
joy a fortnight's outing. They were accompanied by Mrs. 
Parrott's sister, Mrs. Edward Pond, and Mr. Pond. 

MR. AND MRS. JUNIUS BROWNE of New York, who have been 
spending several weeks in San Francisco, left last Friday for 
a ten days' visit to Pasadena. They will return to San Fran- 
cisco Sunday and will be here for several weeks longer before 
returning to their home in the East. 

MRS. LATHAM McMULLIN has been spending the winter months 
at Redlands, and will return to her home in this city April 
1. She went south in the early winter on account of the 
health of her small daughter, Virginia, who was then re- 
cuperating from a recent illness. 

INTIMATIONS 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM STEVENSON and their children, Miss 
Dorothy Stevenson, Henry, George and Arthur Stevenson, ac- 
companied by Miss Mary Dennis Searles, who will be their 
guest on their travels, plan to leave in April for Europe, 
to remain until September. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM W. CROCKER, who have been visit- 
ing at the William H. Crocker home at Burlingame since 
their return from Europe, will soon take possession of the 
Andre Poniatowski home, which is being prepared for their 
occupancy. 



AT THE STRAND 

The Strand Theater has established a precedent in lowering 
its prices which other theaters should follow. One can see a 
show here for half the price that other show houses are asking, 
and what is more, the Strand quite often gets the pick of the 
films. Could anything be more appealing and fascinating to 
the movie fan that the title "Defying Destiny," which starts this 
Saturday, and stars Monte Blue, the idol of the flappers, and 
classic Irene Rich? 



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14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 9, 1924 



IPW TrteLE 





By KEM 

"There is more reason for saying- grace before a new 
book than before a dinner." — Charles Lamb. 

THE PLASTIC AGE by Percy Marks is one of the new 
spring books that comes to us from a new writer, and 
which most people who still remember their youth, or 
who still have youth, will find both entertaining- and 
thoughtful reading. It is a story of modern college life, 
and, from the start, we get in touch with Hugh Carver, 
freshman, hurrying up the hill from the station to the 
college, "his two suitcases, banging against his legs and 
tripping him up" in his hurry to g'et there. Hugh Carver, 
we are told, by the author, is just an average boy, and 
that is why he was chosen for the purpose of showing 
the reactions to all he encounters in his college years. We 
are glad to feel that such a fine type is considered average, 
and enjoy his bewilderment over his roommate, Carl Peters, 
who called his mother his "old lady," insisted "that she 
was a damned nuisance" — and wrote to her every night, 
while Hugh only wrote to his, whom he adored, once a 
week. The "homesick" boy, the embarrassment of the 
freshman about "finding themselves," the hazing, the class- 
work, games, visiting girls and dances are all vivid pictures 
seen through this particular boy's eyes, who, someway 
seems more real and likeable than Stover, of STOVER 
OF YALE fame, or many other heroes of recent college 
stories; and his love experiences very illuminating as to 
the attitude of the average college youth to the modern 
girl. 

Cynthia, the New York girl, chic from her little red hat 
to her pumps, who pets, drinks, and pathetically falls in 
love with Hugh, is very well drawn, and the way she solves 
the problem of their seemingly hopeless tangled relations 
is distinctly feminine ethics, in modern style. 

The chapter, in which the men in "English 53" have 
decided amongst themselves, that college is a farce and all 
they have learned are the "fine points of football, how to 
play poker, smoke, pet and drink," is of special interest, 
taken in conjunction with the one in which thev have a 
talk with Professor Henley, who tells them: 

"It isn't college that coarsens a man and destroys his 
illusions; it is life," and goes on to assure them:' "No, 
colleges are far from perfect, but any institution that com- 
mands loyalty and love as colleges" do, cannot be wholly 
imperfect. . . the average college graduate has loftier ideal's 
. . . than the average man who has not gone to college . . . 
the college draws the best that society has to offer 
Some day administrative officers will" be true educators 
. . . our faculty— wise men really fitted to teach, our stu- 
dents—really students, eager to learn. That day will be 
the millennium. I look for the undergraduate to lead us 
to it." 

The Centrury Co.. $2. 

* * * 

PERSONALITY IN THE MAKING, by Joseph Her- 
schel Coffin, is. we are told, an "illuminating authorative 
book which analyzes for us 'the biggest fact in the uni- 
verse' — human personality. — and shows us how it can be 
developed by the individual." 

Looking through the professor's eyes at this fascinat- 
ing subject, we enjoy his sweeping statement "that the 
individual who has no chosen vocation, has not entered 
upon the road to personality." This is of immense com- 
fort for all who are forced to work, when thev realize they 



are killing two birds with one stone, — earning their living 
and acquiring an increased facility for making life pleas- 
ant for themselves and others. Many hints for acquiring 
this "right attitude of heart" are given ; also we are shown 
what really counts — individuality, and are therefore grate- 
ful for such an uplifting of consciousness. 
Houghton, Mifflin, $2.50. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 

j|ll[gig!gS!llS!gIlg][l®ig(gIl|H]ffi 

§ Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AND PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY 

I 239 Post Street San Francisco 

BBBBBBBBBBHBIllSlBHlHSHBIBBBBBBBBBBHBBHBBlgBEBBliBBi 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Telephone Butter 6180 Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Ness Ave., at Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 



MARY HERETH CAROLINE JONES A 



Luncheon is served from 




:30 to 2:30, 2 
and tea from 3 to 5 ' 



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334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 



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Made to Measure 
only 



IMPORTED FABRICS 
PAJAMAS AND 
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25 Kearny St., Phone Ky. 3714 



Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 
RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, PLUMES, 
PENSTOCKS, GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 
San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 5717 Santa Fe Ave. 



Mayerle Glasses" 

Correct Astigmatism 
Relieve Eye Strain 

960 Market St. 




Scientl II t- Kyp K \ a in i n u I i it n 

29 Tears' Exclusive Optical Practl 
San Francisco 



February 9, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




nator. We wonder it this will be so, 
in the case oi the NEWS LETTER? 



Venetian Color Scheme for Auto Show 
The settings and draperies of the Pa- 
cific Automobile Show at the Civic 
Auditorium, beginning February 16th, 
will be Venetian ; so says Manager 
Wahlgreen, the wizard of shades and 
sensations anent auto exhibits. The 
most interesting' feature of this year's 
.show will be the fact that many of the 
new models and cars which aroused 
excited appreciation at the New York 
and Chicago shows, will be sent here 
for this momentous occasion, and the 
accessory department will be larger 
and better than ever. In fact, regard- 
ing the latter, Mr. Wahlgreen informs 
us that the S. F. show has become so 
important in the eyes of the accessory 
people, that it is probable they will 
make it a national exposition next year. 
The atmosphere throughout will be 
Italian, to blend with the Venetian 
scheme of decoration; even to the or- 
chestra conductor of Paysen's Band; 
for the Committee has just received 
word from New York that Guiseppe 
Creatore, famous Italian conductor, is 
making his final plans to leave for San 
Francisco within the week. 



New York Traffic to be Triple-Decked 

The largest city in the United States 
is considering plans to relieve traffic 
congestion by triple-decking its streets. 
Under this scheme of transportation, 
the City of New York proposes to 
place all rapid transit lines under- 
ground; move all vehicular traffic on 
the street surface, and to construct a 
continuous scries of balconies or ele- 
vated structures for the use of pedes- 
trians. 

Several vears ago, the S. F. NEWS 
LETTER advocated elevated side- 
walks for San Francisco, in its most 
congested streets; the idea being to 
construct the sidewalk on a level with 
the second story of all the buildings, 
for the use of pedestrians, and to have 
the show windows of shops on a level 
with this double deck, thus leaving the 
Street itself free for vehicular traffic. 
Occasionally . since then, it has touched 
upon this subject, adhering to it 
Strongly, as time went on. and the 
problem of congestion became more 
and more acute in our city. And now 
we behold the greatest metropolis in 
the world taking up the advisability 
of this solution, and no doubt later 
on. other great cities will discover the 
wisdom and practicabilit} of the 
scheme, and put it to use. In this con- 
nection, some-one has said that it is 
only the latest advocate of a project 
who receives the credit, not the origi- 



State Highway Work Reorganized by 
Engineer 

The recent establishment of Divi- 
sion X. composed of the territory be- 
tween Sacramento and the northern 
Merced County line, marks the com- 
pletion, for the present, of the reorgan- 
ization of the State Highway Depart- 
ment which has been underway for 
several months, it is announced by 
State Highway Engineer R. M. Mor- 
ton. 

In all, three new divisions have been 
created since Mr. Morton took charge 
a year ago, and the work at headquar- 
ters has been coordinated and system- 
atized by the establishment of five ma- 
jor departments. 

For the first time in the history of 
State Highway work in California, the 
California Highway Commission is 
now a distinct and separate department 
of the State government. This was 
brought about, recently, when a law 
enacted by the last legislature became 
effective, divorcing" highway building 
from the State Department of Public 
Works. 

The State Highway Engineer is now 
free to devote his entire time, thought 
and energy to State highway prob- 
lems and has ceased to direct the af- 
fairs of four other State departments, 
including Water Rights. Irrigation, 
Architecture and Land Settlement. 



Label Roads and Rivers 

The League of American Pen Wo- 
men is asking the various State High- 
way Commissions to place suitable 
markers near famous streams to in- 
form the traveling public. It is a laud- 
able work, but why. the traveler wants 
to know, slop at famous streams? Why 
not mark all bodies of water on or near 
any and all roads, so that the traveler 
ma) get better acquainted with the 
country through which he passes? 



Durant Sales 
Move than 250,000 cars already have 
been built and sold by Durant. includ- 
ing Star. I iiuant. Flint. Locomobile 

cars, and Mason Road King trucks. 
The Durant and Star cars alone have 
yielded $199,000,000. Durant plants 
now have a combined annual produc- 
tion capacity of 650,000 cars. Dealers 
now number over 4000 in the United 
Slates and Canada and there is dis- 
tribution in 37 foreign countries. Du- 
rant Acceptance Corporation will fi- 
nance the retail sales contracts of these 
successful dealers, whose business is 
figured to run at least $100,000,000. 
and will also diversify its activities in 
other fields as occasion arises. 




Happy are Hie men 
who start the day 
with- 

(Swell's 

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Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 
Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cups were served at the Pan- 
ama-Paclflo International Exposition. 



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on the Russian River 

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- — dancing every evening; swimming 
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Weekly Rates. 

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Make Reservations in Advance 
Bee IVok Jmlali or Crabtrees 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 9, 1924 



IMSURE'SWW 




OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moore, 



Popular Symphony Concert 

Tuesday evening in the Civic Au- 
ditorium, "at least 10.000 people gather- 
ed to hear the San Francisco Sym- 
phony Orchestra under Alfred Hertz 
and Josef Schwarz, the guest soloist. 
The program opened with the well 
known prelude in C sharp minor for 
orchestra and organ and started the 
program off with a great boost of en- 
thusiasm. Then came the two move- 
ments of the Dohnanvi suite which 
were lovely bits of color with oboe and 
cello solos and then the English Horn. 
Mr. Schwarz is not at home in Pag- 
liacci though his voice was lovely, and 
he received a big round of applause. 
However in the last number. Wotan's 
Farewell and the Magic Fire Music, 
he was magnificent. As Wotarj he gave 
us Wagner in all its majestic beauty 
and the audience responded to it im- 
mediately. The prelude to Lohengrin 
was beautiful and the Ride of the Val- 
kyries was excellent and received 
thunderous applause. 

The increasing attendance at these 
concerts is a fine indication of the part 
that music fills in the lives of San 
Franciscans and there should be more 
of them. The City has done a fine 
thing in starting these evenings and 
making it possible to have line music 
at a reasonable price. 



Edouard Deru Recital at St. Francis 

On Wednesday evening in the Ital- 
ian Room at the St. Francis Hotel, 
Edouard Deru, the famous Belgian 
violinist and head of the violin depart- 
ment of the Arrillaga Musical College 
of this city, gave a very interesting re- 
cital with the assistance of Beatrice 
Anthony, pianist. 

An enthusiastic crowd was present 
and the artists were the recipients of 
several encores. Mr. Deru plays with 
the repression of fine scholarship and 
all his work is tinged with the artistic- 
finish which we have come to expect 
from him. 

Miss Anthony's work was excellent 
and the piano solos that she gave were 
well done and encored most heartily. 
MYNARD S. JONES. 



Tivoli Opera House 

On Friday. February 1st, Max Rab- 
inoff presented Alexander Koshetz' 
Ukrainian National Chorus. It was a 
five-part program, featuring Mile. Oda 
Slobodskaja, leading Soprano Petro- 
grad Opera, and Fwssei Belcfussoff, 



billed as Russia's foremost 'cellist. In- 
formation has been given to the public 
that the forty voices are the chosen 
from fifteen hundred in L'krainia. and 
rumor has it they had been previously 
taught, most of them, by Bohemians 
traveling through their country. Some 
of them had become teachers them- 
selves, and all were recommended for 
the choral selection because of the pe- 
culiarity and line quality of their 
voices. The singing hail been ingen- 
iously rehearsed to approximate in- 
struments in an orchestra. It was very 
beautiful and musical the way some- 
times all, and at other times, different 
groups of voices accompanied the solo- 
ists. But there was little solo work; — 
periods of bell-like high tones, then 
but occasional trilling with a resound- 
ing in of lower vocalization. The pre- 
dominant accompaniments were tonal 
effects as of rich organ music. Even 
the humming was the resonance of 
lingering organ notes. Beloussoff, the 
'cellist, accompanied at the piano by 
M. Nicholas Stember, a very good mu- 
sician, sang with feeling — at least it 
seemed he was singing, and we will 
take their word for it that he is Rus- 
sia's ln-st on the 'cello. Listening to 
him one cannot easily imagine his su- 
perior anywhere. He carried alone two 
parts of the program, first a long con- 
certo by Saint-Saens, and later an Aria 
by Pergolezi, Melodie by Gluck, and 
Traumerei by Schumann. Beloussoff 
has bigness as well as much beauty in 
his playing; he can make his change-, 
ol moods without disconnection in the 
suspense he seems to strive for, and 
rightfully; he can use a long, finish- 
ing note that barely reaches the ear, 
but that newer loses its value. 



La Gaite Francaise 

"Blanchette," by Brieux, is current 
at Andre Ferrier's small playhouse. 
Yvonne du Pare does splendidly with 
the title role. She gets around the 
stage as if at home and displays con- 
siderable emotion. Henri (.'bateau, as 
"Ron-set" is by far the most effective 
of the players in this bill. .Mr. Fer- 
rier handles a comparatively small role 
admirably, and C. Fallon again shows 
his capability. I. Bietry should be told 
it is not necessary to pout continually 
in old women parts. 



pany successfully doing' the business 
is that of Hartman-Steindorf, in the 
Chocolate Soldier. The performance, 
from the standpoint of music, leaves 
little to be desired and from the stand- 
point of acting there might be some 
improvement. On the whole, however, 
the audiences, which have packed the 
house, have gone away with a feeling 
of great satisfaction. What a flood of 
memories the beautiful songs and the 
situations in this comic opera bring 
back! 

Harriet Bennett, Dixie Blair, and 
Lavinia Winn hold the stage in the 
first act, with the help, later on, of 
John Van and Robert Carlson, whose 
Maasakroff is a burlesque of a bur- 
lesque. The second act brings better 
action and better singing and, by the 
time the third act is sung and played, 
the ensemble is going with a vim. 
llarlman is his usual very funny self 
and never seems to grow any older. 
The music by Steindorf and his or- 
chestra is well rendered. 



Columbia 

She is just the kind of Mary that you 
would want for an aunt and just the 
sort which fits the role of "auntie." is 
May Robson, in "The Rejuvenation of 
Aunt Mary" at the Columbia. 

( 'in- is terribly bored at the end of 
the first act. May Robson. an almost 
flawless character actress, is at her 
best throughout the play, though, and 
as the action progressed things grew 
more interesting and one liked the 
supporting cast a little more. 

And here rests the tale: the support- 
ing cast They were s,, j n name only, 




W E 



The Chocolate Soldier 

The Casino Theater seems, at last, 
to have come into its own and the com- 



FEBRUARY16-n23 

Visitors to the Auto Show are cordially 
invited to make Hotel Plaza their 
headquarters. Every essential to perfect 
comfort,and a splendid program, of en- 
tertainment, has been provided. 



HOTEL. 

PLATA 

POST STREET AT STOCKTON 



SAN FRANCISCO 



February 9, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 



hey did not do much suppi >i mi:;. 
We were sorn to see such a jewel as 
May Robson in such a setting. It real- 
ly does not do her justice. 

We liked Louise Carter as "Betty" 
ami "Lucinda," Aunt Mary's maidish 
mail! portrayed by Lillian Harmer, 
was good. The show is one you should- 
n't miss for May Robson is on stage 
almost all of the time — which insures 
a perpetual laugh. 



Curran 

Four years old. and after thrilling, 
according to statistics, more than 6,- 
000,000 theater patrons, "The Bat" is 
continuing to hold audiences in sus- 
pense until the very last line of the 
play at the Curran this week. 

Written by Avery Hopwood and 
Mary Roberts Reinhart, this play is 
one which could have come from the 
pen of Conan Doyle or Edgar Allen 
Poe. Lizzie Evans again appears as 
Miss Cornelia Van Gorden, and she is 
as lovable as ever. Josephine Morse 
is her thoroughly frightened maid and 
Helen Redd plays Miss Dale Ogden. 

We couldn't tell you anything of the 
"Bat" — that would spoil it all. But 
one warning — if your wife screams 
easily, keep her away from this show. 



Orpheum 

With wonderful clothes and, ah, a- 
hum, form which would do Mack Sen- 
nett proud, Karyl Norman, "the Cre- 
ole Fashion I Mate." returned to the 
( Irpheum this week with a brand, new- 
act and loads of new gowns. Norman's 
voice is just a little bit better as a 
man's than a woman's — as is natural, 
but if one had never seen Norman be- 
fore and went to the Orpheum this 
week that person would think Norman 
a stunning young "lady." He is as- 
sisted, in every sense of the word, by 
Keno Clark and Bobbie Simonds, and 
the act was called "the Tuneful Song 
Shop." 

As [or Gray's orchestra, with New- 
huff and Phelps, we liked it very much. 
Their selections were good and the 
voices pleasing. In fact this was about 
the most enjoyable act on the bill and 
we were sorry to see the Orpheum 

management place it last on the pro- 
gram So many persons leave in the 
middle of the act for probably some 
place where the music wasn't half as 
good. Maybe it wouldn't be a bad idea 

if the management locked the ,1 - 

with as good an act as this. But! we'd 
hate to get stuck with one of those 
acrobatic teams which come here oc- 
casionally and which remind one of a 
Greek Restaurant. 

I'rank De Voe gave a few excerpts 
from musical comedy successes. A skit 
"What's the Idea" made one wonder 
the same, but nevertheless Bert Lahr 
was at his best and was appreciated. 
lack Osterman is all right, even if he 



is conceited, but to one who has seen 
him. he is always the same. The Three 

Melvin Brothers, gymnasts, are excel- 
lent. Celebrating their 50 years as a 
stage team. Mclntyre and Heath will 
head the bill at the Orpheum for the 
week starling February 10. 



Players' Club 

The Players' Club's production of 
Lennox Robinson's "White Headed 
Boy," the sixth production of the new 
regime, registered another triumph for 
Everett Glass, successor director to 
Reginald Travers, and the members of 
the club in the cast. The family rebels 
when their pet, Denis, fails to make use 
of his advantages and effectively get 
themselves into a still deeper rut of 
catering to the boy than they had been 
in before. If there is a moral, it is to 
never start designating a white headed 
boy in a family because it is a habit 
that is not remediable. Mention should 
be made of the characterization of 
Margaret Tomson who culminates her 
part as the youngest sister with a de- 
licious exhibition of purposely tuneless 
and humorous singing which, at that, 
seemed superior to many motion pic- 
ture theater sopranos or contraltos, 
whichever it was supposed to be, that 
we have heard lately. Others who did 
excellently in the cast were Mary 
Growney, Helen Craig Growney, Es- 
telle Kane. Walter H. Krieger, Louis 
Wood White and Josephine Clement. 

S.L. 



Cameo 

Hoot Gibson, the Universal star, a 
cow boy by birth and aptitude, takes 
his ranchero tricks into the city's fire 
department and does a pretty good pic- 
ture in "Hook and Ladder" at the 
Cameo this week. The picture was de- 
cidedly not a false alarm, although we 
have seen I loot do better work in some 
of his real wild west thrillers. It has 
plenty of thrills and lots of action with 
a generous amount of human stuff and 
romance thrown in. Of course, there 
is a girl in the story — there is almost 
always a girl in a thriller — and this 
one is Mildred June. And she does 
just what the girls are supposed to 
do and although she acts well, we 
would not say that Mildred is anything 
to get excited about. "The Flower 
Girl" followed the feature and starred 
Baby Peggy. She appears as a little 
girl of the Latin Quarter and appears 
well. F.milie Linden and her orchestra 
supplies a good program. 



Plaza 

The crowds who throng the Plaza 
Theater to hear Cone, the apostle of 
auto-suggestion, will have an oppor- 
tunity to see the theory worked out 
in practical life when the Telegraph 
Hill Players present Strindberg's 
"Countess lulia" at the same theater 



on February 15, 16 and 17. This pow- 
erful play of the great Swedish dram- 
atist is based just as Cone's cures are, 
on the power of the mind over the 
body. The play is new to San Fran- 
cisco, but it will be of intense inter- 
est not only to disciples of Coue, but 
also to those who are students of the 
new psychology of Freud. Above all, 
it is a fascinating drama of the natur- 
alistic school. "Countess Julia" will 
be followed on the same nights by Ber- 
nard Shaw's farce-melodrama of the 
pioneer West, "The Showing Up of 
Blanco Posnet." 



An Interesting Lecture 

The Astronomical Society of the Pa- 
cific announces the fourth of the series 
of popular lectures for the season of 
1923-24. at Native Sons' Hall. 430 Ma- 
son street, on Friday evening, Febru- 
ary 15th, at 8 o'clock. Dr. E. L. Lewis, 
head of the department of physics in 
the University of California, will de- 
liver the lecture and present "The 
Physics of Astronomy," with illustra- 
tions and experiments, in such non- 
technical language as will convey a 
clear understanding to all present. The 
lecture is free to the public. 

Freddy — Papa, what are friendly re- 
lations? Papa — I don't know, Freddy. 
I never had any. 



World Cruise 

Six Months Vacation 
Cheaper than staying at home 

The big trans-oceanic yacht "INTREPID" 
now bi ling refitted Into a palatial and lux- 
urious yacht is expected to sail from San 
Francisco on or about March 31st, on the 
first six months hip of the must interest- 
ing ea cruise ever outlined. 
This cruise is strictly for pleasure and 
the yacht will carry none but the peopl< 
comprising the company. 
A complete motion picture organization 
will accompany the yacht, making sea and 
travelogue pictures in which the members 
can take part and Reap the Profits that are 
assured from the Bales of these pictures. 
Every comfort and convenience will be 
provided and stops of sufficient length will 

he made for sight seeing in all of the 

principal ami interesting spots <>n the 
globe 

The cost is cheaper than living at i ■ 

would I- I- i Lucatlon 

Unobtainable at many times the cost ••! 
the trip. 

For- further particulars write or call at 
office 216 Liberty Bank Building. 

The Intrepid Company 
i-i California 



STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 
Each beginner is immediately given 
a role and productions arranged. 

STUDIO 

50fl Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Kearny 54."> t 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



"Lights 

of Learning' 



is a very striking page 
of night photos of Stan- 
ford University, a page 
of beautiful photograph- 
ic effects, that will be 
appreciated by all read- 
ers of next Sunday's 
Rotagravure Section. 
Another interesting lo- 
cal page is a series of 
photos taken "At the 

Quatr'z 
Arts Ball 

showing some of the 
beautiful and quaint 
costumes and those who 
wore them. "San Fran- 
cisco Boy Scouts" is a 
page of interesting 
photo studies, showing 
the activities of the boy 
scouts, and there are 
many pictures of nota- 
bles at home and 
abroad. All the worth- 
while news of the world 
is told pictorially in 
The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1023 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Cough 
Telephone Park 871 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE JOSHUA 
HENDY IRON WORKS 

The regular annual meeting of the stockhold- 
ers of The Joshua Hendy Iron "Works will be 
held at the office of the corporation. No. 75 
Fremont Street. San Francisco, California, on 
Tuesday, the 12th day of February, 1924, at the 
hour of Id o'clock a. m., for the purpose of 
electing a Board of Directors to serve for the 
ensuing year, and the transaction of such other 
business as may come before the meeting. 

CHAS. C. GARDNER, Secretary. 
Office, 75 Fremont Street, San Francisco, Cal. 




"Mummy, I gut such a pain. 
"Where, dear?" "Where the pickles 
is." — Passing Show (London). 



Mrs. Crawford—Does your little boy 
hate to run errands? Mrs. Crabshaw — 
It depends on whether I send him for 
laundry soap or ice cream. 



First She — How do you like my new 
engagement ring? Second She — It's a 
peach; when does it come off? — North- 
western Purple Parrot. 



Wife — After all, Clarence, this trip 
isn't going to be so expensive. With 
the four dresses I simply had to get 
and your clothes cleaned and pressed, 
we'll manage splendidly. — Humorist 
( London). 



(to freshman 



entering 



Professor 
class late ) — When were you born i 
Freshman — On the second of April. 
Professor — Late again. — Georgia Tech. 
Yellow Jacket. 



"Why did George marry Dingy?" 
"Well, they were engaged for two 
years and he got tired of seeing her 
every day." — Kansas Sour Owl. 



Shooting Tenant — What with the 
rent of the moor, my expenses, and 
everything, each bird I bring down 
costs me a pound note. Donald — Weel, 
sir, it's only the morn that I said to 
Sandy here, "Sandy, the master must 
be missing those birds on purpose!" 



PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 

38TH CONSECUTIVE QUARTERLY DIVI- 
DEND OX FIRST PREFERRED STOCK, 
The regular quarterly dividend of $1.50 per 
share upon the preferred capital stock of this 
company will be paid by check on February 
15, 1924, to shareholders of record at close of 
business January 31, 1924. The transfer books 
Will not be closed. 

Twelve Months to November 80, 1923 

Cross earnings $39,703,897 

Net after taxes, etc 1G, 558,422 

Surplus for preferred stock after 

prior charges and depreciation 6,695,883 

I nvule nds paid on preferred stock 3.1 u:;.2 l :t 

Balance 3,692,664 

Warned per share of preferred stock $12.33 

Dividends paid 15th February, May. August 
and November. 

A. V. HOCKENBEAMER, 
Vice-President and Treasurer. 
San Francisco, Calif. 



February 9, L924 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of James Wheeler Riley, deceased, No. 
38120. Dept, Xo. 10. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. J. Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased, to the creditors 
of and all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within four (4) months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
of the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, or to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the first 
publication of this notice to the said adminis- 
trator, at his office. 858 Phelan Building, San 
Francisco. California, which said last-named of- 
fice the undersigned selects as his place of busi- 
ness in all matters connected with said estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES. 
Administrator of the estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, California, January 22nd, 

1924. 
CTJLIiINAN & HICKEY, 

Attorneys for Administrator. 5t 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of August Bod. deceased, No. 38110. 
Dept. No. 10. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. J. Hynes. administrator of the estate of 
August Bod, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within four (4) months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
of the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, or to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the first 
publication of this notice to the said adminis- 
trator, at his office. 858 Phelan Building. San 
Francisco, California, which said last-named of- 
fice the undersigned selects as his place of busi- 
ness in all matters connected with said estate of 
August Bod, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES. 
Administrator of the estate of 
August Bod, deceased. 
Dated. San Francisco. California, January 22nd, 

1924. 
CULLINAN & HICKEY, 

Attorneys for Administrator. 5t 

NOTICE OK ANNUAL MEETING OF 
STOCKHOLDERS 

Not ire is hereby given that the annual meet- 
ing of the stockholders of PATTERSON RANCH 
i U r.vii'AXY, a corporation, will be held at the 
office of the corporation, to-wit: the "Directors 
Room," in the building of the Union Trust Com- 
pany of San Francisco, at the junction of Mar- 
ket and O'Parrell streets and Grant avenue, San 
Francisco. California, on WEDNESDAY, Feb- 
ruary 13. 1924, at the hour of ten o'clock a. m., 
for the purpose of electing directors for the en- 
suing year and the transaction of any other 
business which may properly come before the 
meeting. 

W. W. PATTERSON', Secretary. 

ke'cIPs 

Prescription Pharmacies 

"Keek's Way Is the Safe Way" 

Three Pharmacies 
Fifth Floor, 135 Stockton St. 

Second Floor, 209 Post St. 

Second Floor, 240 Stockton St. 

San Francisco 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Plume Kearny 391 San Francisco 



Carl Lconhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



C. LALANNE 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL, 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

OLD POODLE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A $1.35 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m. 

to 9 p. m. 

Also A La Carte 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

I'linne Kearny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
91-25 

Meal* Served a la Carte. Alio Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 
FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Plume Franklin 
No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. in.).. 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.5(1 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .$1 .75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street 



Golden Gate Restaurant 

2721 Hyde St. Phone Franklin 0500 
SAX FRANCIS! o 

Afternoon Parties a Specialty 
Dance Italian Dinner 




CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 




MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEXEON 
process. . 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Tour investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1050 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3419 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



Tel. Franklin SflKfi 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining; to Automobile* 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blacksmlthlng* 

H. W. Culver M. Daherer E. Johnson 



Tlione Garfield 3026 



Palmer Graduate 



Hours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Western States Life Building 

995 Mnrket Street Sun Francisco 



GANTNER & MAISON 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. ISth and 1 !>th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 

and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 3oC per day; 7.. ">o per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS :' 13 

si\ Floors lor Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 




■ ■T..LI.HEO 1... 



N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 
MR. and MRS. A. F. C0SGR0VE 



Re photographed this year on your 
Birthday 



Studios In all Principal Cities of California 



Oakland 
408 14th 



San Francisco 
41 Grant Ave. 



Quality 1866--66 Years--1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following Places: 

Burllngeme Redwood City Menlo Park 

San Mateo Woodelde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Street* 

San Francisco Phone Market 816 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 148* 

Economy Durability 



Parisian Dyeing and Gleaning 



Bolts Pressed by Hand. Only — 
Salts Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Piiri-inn Dyeing and Cleaning 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 



n 



KEATON NON-SKIDS PREVENT ACCIDENTS 




The skidding car in this picture is equipped with one of the numerous makes of SO-CALLED "non- 
skid" tires. Although nearly all tires are claimed to be "non-skid," skidding and sliding accidents are 
occurring daily. 

MAKE YOUR CAR SAFE! 

The Keaton is the one genuine Non-Skid Tire that will give you the much needed protection for your- 
self and loved ones. 

KEATON TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO LOS ANGELES PORTLAND SEATTLE 



AUTO SHOW NUMBER 



Established July 20, 1850 



SAN FRANCISCO 




AND 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



California Advertiser 



* "i 



*j 



v 



$5.ft0 PER^YEAR 



;^e 



a <* 



r M 




SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1924 




NEW STATE HIGHWAY, LOS GATOS TO SANTA CRUZ 
1—OLD ROAD AND NEW HIGHWAY. 2-3 — SHOWING HIGHWAY CONSTRUCTION 



St. Marys 
cAcadt 



emy 



San Leandro, California 

»! 

For particulars address 

SISTER SUPERIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any Incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk It over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system; it takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 
Self Cleansing Bridges ; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

Practice limited to 
EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours 10 to 5 — By Appointment — 

Saturday 10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 

Removed to Suite 537 Llebes Bldg. 

177 POST STREET 

San Francisco 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California. 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1923 

Assets $89,174,468.37 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 430,275.37 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (414) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation 

General 
Inability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 

WALTER W. DERR . Manager 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up C»plt.l (15,000.000 J13.000.000 Beserve Fond 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

486 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.; NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 

San Francisco Office: 450 CALIFORNIA STREET 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 

Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice of Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 






OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

S17-1S California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



The Name PIONEER 

on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er it be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 
o r stationer t o 







show you samples. " JE^ -Ht HlT 1 . ■ JXi l:Hf 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1856 
41 First Street - - San Francisco 



WEDDINGS A SPECIALTY 

Kelly's Limousine Service Will Please You 
The finest machines. Dependable, cour- 
teous chauffeurs. \ T o disappointments. 
Reasonable prices. Special rate for shop- 
ping. Open and closed -cars. 




Phone Franklin 217 
1629 Pine Street San Francisco 






EiUMUhtd July 10. I&M 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 





Vol. CIV 



SAX FRANCISCO, CALIF. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1924 



No. 7 



THE SAX FRANCISCO X1CWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, 
Frederick Marriott, Russ Building, 235 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, 
Calif. Telephone Douglas 6853. Entered at San Francisco, Calif., Post 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage) : One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 : Canada, one year, $6.00. 



— It is a bad year for governors, or a year for bad gov- 
ernors; it is hard to tell which. 

* * + 

— An Eastern paper says that it is strange how Mali 
Jongg attained such popularity without being denounced 
by anybody. 

— There are a lot of people in this country who ought 
to be made to realize that the torch of the Goddess of 
Liberty on Governor's Island can light the way out as 
well as in. 

=i= * * 

— San Francisco has so much money that is waiting for 
profitable investment that next summer should see the big- 
gest realty and building boom ever staged in and around 
its limits. 

* * * 

— Coffee imports for the calendar' year 1923 into the 
United States are valued at $l l M,000,000 as against $105,- 
000.000 in 1913, according to the Trade Record of the Na- 
tional City Rank of New York. 

— The hootch fleet off the port of New York seems to 
be quite as busy as it ever was. The twelve mile limit 
has not to any extent, it seems from reports, made it more 
difficult to obtain the fluid which joys and inebriates. 

* * * 

— The movie people of I lolly wood arc busily engaged 
trying to produce thrillful plays without sin or sinful plays 
without thrills, so as to suit everybody's tastes outside of 
the classic precincts over which rule the producers. 

* # * 

— The sidewalks of our city are so dirty and slimy in 
places, that we have to watch our step carefully, and the 
gutters of some streets reek with filth. Isn't it about time 
that the Board of Public Works start Spring house clean- 
ing? 

* * * 

— Bolshevistic Russia still extends its blood} hand for 
reciprocal relations with civilized nations. The announce- 
ment is made that the death of Lenin will make no differ- 
ence at all in Russia or out of it. as far as the Bolshevists 
arc concerned. 

* * * 

— Manipulation of currency in one country in Europe, 
influences the currency in other European countries. No 
matter how the franc or the yen or the mark or the rouble 
or the lire or the pound sterling may jump up or down, the 
good old American dollar stays at a permanent elevation. 



— A Berlin dispatch says Germany is facing bankruptcy. 
If she is, she must have turned around. She passed that 
station long ago. 

* * * 

— Some ancient philosopher has said: "Humility is 
Truth." At first these two words seem disassociated each 
from the other, but ponder them awhile. Truth is a basic 
condition, a fundamental that must of necessity stand alone, 
aloof from all illusive or fictitious conceptions. Humility 
strips one of all selfishness and vanity; all fallacious per- 
ceptions. This is the state of mind that can glean the ker- 
nels of grain from the chaff; the grains of gold from the 
silt; the Truth from the Lie. 

— Jeff Davis, the most famous hobo in the world, visited 
the movie star, Conrad Nagel, recently, and the latter, think- 
ing the noted tramp would have an interesting view of the 
subject, asked his opinion on "what the public wants." To 
which Jeff replied: "The public doesn't know what it wants. 
After they've got it, they don't know they've got it. When 
they have it, they don't know what to do with it. And if 
they miss it, they don't know it's gone." 

# * * 

— Carmel Myers, beautiful Goldwyn screen siren, applied 
recently for a passport for her trip to Italy, where she is 
to play a leading role in "Hen Hur." She came to a ques- 
tion in the application blank "Distinguishing marks or blem- 
ishes." "Let me see. . . . No vaccination scratches . . cuts 
. . bruises . . . Ah . . . dimples in the back." So "dimples in 
the back" was written down on the dotted line. 



— The buying power of the ordinary American appears 
to have tripled during the last fifteen years. That many 
years ago if the working man marshalled his family to the 
theater once a week, and spent a quarter apiece for scats, 
he was a good fellow. If he hired a horse and "buggy" 
on Sundays, and took his wife and offsprings for a gentle 
drive into the country, he was an extravagant man. Now, 
with movie houses operating day and night, and crowded 
at everv performance, and an automobile to every 2-1 3 
man in California, one can judge of the increase in the in- 
comes of the masses. 

* * * 

— Numerous letters and marked copies of publica- 
tions sent to the Real Fstate Hoard regarding the elimina- 
tion of billboards along the new Skyline Boulevard, have 
followed this Board's initial campaign to keep the Boule- 
vard free from this sort of nuisance, ami the Chamber of 
Commerce reports its intention to appoint a committee to 
join with the realtors in this undertaking. All of which is 
^ood work, and should be well supported. Hut. while we 
are on this subject. wh\ cannot a committee be appointed 
by some public welfare organization, to take up the mat- 
ter of appropriately naming this new highway? Why are 
we so deficient and poverty-stricken in ideas, that we should 
lie forced to steal this cognomen from Oakland's skyline 
road ? 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 1924 




The death of one Ed Holley. a prize- 
The Prize fighter, at Stockton, from injuries in 

Fighting Nuisance the ring, received while taking part in 
an illegal boxing contest in that city, 
brings up the whole matter of prizefighting and its pre- 
judicial effects upon the morals and the position of the 
State of California throughout the rest of the nation. We 
are getting a bad name; we have one, already, for this 
sort of thing. It is time that it was stopped, for good and 
all. 

This Stockton happening is made all the worse from the 
fact that there was no permit. It seems that public feel- 
ing had risen some months before in connection witli these 
fights and the city government had promised that there 
would be no more of them. But on this occasion the police 
allowed the fight to proceed, with the understanding that 
there would be an arrest and that the matter would be 
threshed out in a test case. That is a curious condition of 
affairs, that the police should allow a fight to proceed with- 
out a permit, and shows the influence that the pugilistic 
gang- has in some quarters, where they ought not to have 
any influence. 

This is very typical of all the actions of the pugilistic 
fraternity. They are dangerous and insolent and push their 
claims to recognition and to making- money, even against 
the law and the well being of the community. Take, for 
example, what goes on as regards the importation of prize 
fight films. As is well known, it is unlawful to import films 
from one state into another, when such films deal with prize 
fights and are representations of prize fights. It is a law 
which should be enforced, as the presentation of such mat- 
ters to the public is enervating and destructive of moral 
tone and leads to brutality and the degradation of public- 
standards of conduct, in our estimation at least. Be that 
as it may, these films are brought here in defiance of the 
law. Such films were presented at a local play house show- 
ing the Dempsey-Firpo fight. Of course there are fines 
for bringing them in and there may be fines for exhibiting 
them. But what are such fines in comparison with the 
profit to be made? Besides, the law is broken, as it was in 
the case we have named at Stockon. It is the breaking of 
the law that we object to. the violation of the law by a 
gang of vulgar people whose only object is to make money 
at the expense of the good name of the community, 

Now, there is no question that the law should be en- 
forced in this prize-fighting matter as in all others. It 
is against the best interests of the community that the 
police in Stockton or anywhere else should allow a prize 
fight, for which no official permit has been given. It is 
also against the best interests of the community that films 
prohibited from coming into the State should be brought in 
and exhibited on the payment of a nominal fine. 

Apart from that, it is entirely bad that professional 
pugilism should be allowed to continue in a civilized com- 
munity, and if we allow it to go on here, it will be at the 
cost of the approval of that part of the United States whose 
good opinion we cherish and whose disapproval in the long 
run is detrimental to our prosperity. 



remarkable was the extraordinarily high grade representa- 
tion both on the platform and in the audience. The latter 
was truly representative of the best in San Francisco life 
and nobody who looked carefully at the type of citizen- 
ship there could have other than that feeling that such 
people were entitled to have their wishes respected, as 
they were indicative of the finest and most conservative 
factors in our city. The platform speakers included cler- 
gyman of influence and of undoubted position and gravity, 
Dudley Field Malone of New York, one of the most in- 
fluential men in the first Wilson regime, Collector of the 
Port of Xew York, a man who showed his metal by giv- 
ing up high positions for the sake of a principle, when the 
time came that he had to choose, made a most logical and 
sensible speech in favor of the amendment, which would 
permit of the sale of light wines and beers under state 
control. This is a method which has been widely used in 
Canada and which has proven to be successful, both from 
the point of view of temperance and as a really needed 
adjunct to the tax providing facilities of the government. 
Needless to say the use of hard liquor was repudiated by 
speakers and audience alike, and the old saloon is regarded 
as dead beyond any possibility of recovery. So that under 
the circumstances there does not appear to lie any valid 
reason why the light-wine-and-beer amendment should not 
lie contemplated with approval by all classes in the com- 
munity. 



Most of us at some time or other 
The Teacher Question are confronted by the teacher 

question. The sort of teacher which 
we want for our children and which our children should 
really have, if they are to make their way in the world 
and grow up worth while, is an absorbing matter in the 
family. It is capable of various answers depending on the 
state of mind and social ideals of the person attempting 
to settle it. One such person writing in the public press 
on the unfashionable type of teacher says : "And a fine spec- 
imen that sort of teacher would be for boy pupils to ad- 
mire and girl pupils to imitate." The implication is that 
boy pupils can only admire and girl pupds can only imi- 
tate a young; woman who wears bobbed hair, powders her 
nose, wears silk stockings and dances the fox trot, a thor- 
oughly up to date creature, differing in no way much from 
the denizen of the cabaret and the frequenter of the hotel 
lobbeys. if pupils admire that sort of thing, that is just 
the sort of thing that they admire, paraphrasing Lin- 
coln. But the fruits of such admiration are gathered 
in the divorce court, and in the numerous scandals which 
terminate in the choking of lovely young women actresses 
and lesser tragedies which differ from the foregoing only 
in degree. The whole teaching question is in a very dan- 
gerous state. The condition of the schools is not what it 
should be, as we shall prove, chapter and verse, in a com- 
ing number. It is true that we do not want frowsy teach- 
ers, nor do we want boards of education who are inclined 
to interfere with the reasonable liberty of teachers; teach- 
ers so interfered with would be of little value. But do we 
want replicas of the movie favorite presiding over the 
schi lolroom ? 



The campaign for a sensible 
Sensible Liquor Laws amendment to the Volstead Act 

has been started with a flourish at 
the Auditorium. The meeting last Monday night indicated 
very plainly the amount of public interest. What was most 



— There is no end to the improvement that this commun- 
ity is making as a music-loving and appreciating place. We 
have our musical weeks and we are to have a spring festi- 
val which, according to the program, will be exceptionally 
fine. There is no place of its size in world which revels 
in good music as we do. The explanation is to be found in 
the make-up of our population. We have now reached a 
generation in which the strains of race are well mixed 
and the music-loving Mediterraneans are reacting on the 
Nordics, who form the basis of our population. 



February 16, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




By ANTISTHENES 

Tl 1 E smoke of verbal battle 'twixt church modernists and 
fundamentalists, recently engaged in dissecting the body 

of Christianity, has moled away, but, as is usual when 
surgeons engage in diametrically opposed carvings on the 
same human frame, the victim is inclined to motivate to- 
ward where the undertaker takes charge! So, what of the 
effect on church communicants, and, is my case a criterion? 

I, a former pagan, have had it preached unto me by a 
christ-doctor of divinity that Mary was a virgin and the 
conception of Christ a suspension of the natural law; an- 
other ordained follower of Christ informs me the christian 
Savior was born of Mary, a woman, whose spouse was 
Joseph, the child's natural father! In my mind this creates 
an impasse, for. both apologists cannot be right. Still re- 
taining a leaning to paganism. I secretly favor the fun- 
damentalist and his doctrine of miraculous conception, for 
it smacks of the superstitious, but, again the insurmount- 
able: I was taught to put behind me things of paganism 
wherein conjured gods come forth in contravention of na- 
tural laws. Hence, in obedience to this teaching, I. in turn. 
lean to the modernist and his mandate of Mary, the ordin- 
ary woman, and, ergo, — Christ a human, even as I. There- 
after, because of these waverings in belief, and, by de- 
duction, (for these divines reason and eliminate the ele- 
ment of faith) may I not feel privileged to conclude all else 
written of the new testament — miracles, redemption, di- 
vinity — subject to question? Therefore, into the discard 
must I cast all christian belief, for, question one article of 
faith, and all may be subject to question. 

Then, and bearing intimately on my disposition to apos- 
tatize, the mass of unsavory journalistic notoriety (which, 
if not coveted, is. at least, not spurned) indulged by min- 
isters ostensibly engrossed in spiritual communing with 
God nor caring for contention, seems itself a refutation of 
professed contact with Divinity, and, 1 ask: Docs it not 
behoove representatives of a lowly Jesus rather to fill their 
lives with the seeking out of the stricken, the sorrowing, 
the homeless and the sinner — daily task of llim who was 
crucified — than engaging in vain paradings of small rhet- 
orics? For, though I disavow belief in Christ's divinity. 1 
rever the man who went about doing those things and deem 
his manner of birth of less consequence than what he was. 
So, if another day 1 shall again find faith in Christianity, I 
will have been swayed thereto, not by golden oratory, 
crowning spires nor even reasoning — it may come when 
I shall have beheld ministers, threadbare of raiment and 
aenemic of face, going their ways among the lowly where 
this |esus, should lie come again, would be found. 

— Governor Warren T. McCray of Indiana is a voluntary 
bankrupt! Page Diogenes, as this may be worth his look- 
ing into. 

* * * 

— Our superintendent of schools is in a quandary anent 
the "class of schools" to be erected. We would suggest 
schools of classes — we have had sufficient of the bow! 
alb \ -one-story type. 

— The lawyer who defended 1. W. W.'s in Centraha. 
Wash., is slated for disbarment. We hope this is not be- 
cause he defended these vagabonds; Pontius Pilate washed 
his ban. I- of the blood of (hie who Stood at the bar of 
justice and for two thousand years he has been held in 
exercration bv all mankind. 



— It is reported Superintendent of Schools Gwinn re- 
entry --aid he must ascertain whether or not he wants 
"school chairs nailed to the floor"! We would suggest 
nailing the pupils to chairs — figuratively, of course. 

* * * 

— Standard < >il has levied another two cents on our gas- 
oline; this will give John 1). a few additional millions to 
lay out in $20,000 a year salaries for more Andersons, 
Pussyfoots and State anti-saloon leagues! We pay. 

* * * 

— To those who say the published photos of former Sec- 
retary of the Interior Fall resemble that of a man who 
was hanged and the rope cut just before the end came, 
we might charitably retort that you can't tell a book by its 
cover. 

* * * 

— The revamped school department in search of new ideas 
for its conduct of affairs might revert to some of those that 
are "ever ancient, ever new" by hitching the chariot of 
learning to that trio of redoubtable steeds: Readin', 'ritin' 
and 'rithmetic. 

* * * 

— W. H. Anderson will not do a tap of work for the 
anti-saloon league wdiile he is a guest at Sing Sing, for, 
being a professed christian apostle, he opines "he who 
preaches the gospel must live by the gospel" and John 
D. Jr. has pushed him off the payroll — the one the motor- 
ing public "subscribes" for. 

* * * 

— Prohibition Director Rutter is quoted as saying there 
are 27,000.000 gallons of wine in California and these should 
be properly guarded against leakage, etc., (principally 
"etc.",) as only 1000 gallons per month are legally dis- 
posed of. As, "legitimately," the last bottle of this for- 
bidden juice will have been drawn 2000 years hence at 
this rate, my, what a multitude of poor guards shall have 
been subjected to temptation. 

* * * 

— A bigot is never a courageous criminal but attempts 
only crimes where small risk entails; consequently, when 
W. II. Anderson of the anti-saloon league was caught forg- 
ing, he uttered the following rat-squeal: "I have been 
framed by the wets, Catholics and politicians"! Despite this 
rodent-squeak, Justice Tompkins, a Protestant, a Mason 
and a prohibitionist, speeded Andy on to a two year so- 
journ in Sing Sing. 

* * * 

— On the da) of former President Wilson's funeral the 
Mayor ordered all city offices closed for the afternoon. 
Si .me did, Others ignored the request — the Auditor and 
Treasurer being among those whose overmastering sor- 
row for the departed so dimmed their orbs they couldn't 
function. \s a result of said poignant grief many merchants 
who had trudged through the gale to get their warrants 
cashed likewise went their ways sorrowing — but not for 
the dead. This "head bowed low" stuff seems more genu- 
ine when indulged in during other than office hours. 

* * * 

— Are we forever to bear what might be termed news- 
paper's hypocritical inflating of non-existants ? Relating to 
the passing of ex-President Woodrow Wilson, we have 
been regaled with a plethora of "nation bowed down in 
sorrow." "grief stricken fellow citizens." "tearful men and 
women." "a pang in the heart of a nation." "souls flattened 
under weight of sorrow," etc. Drained of the drugs of 
exaggeration the clarified residue was this: relatives and 
intimate friends sorrowed, bitter enemies relented, news- 
papers experienced a welcomed period of relaxation in the 
chase to fill their sheets, the curious and the morbid satis- 
fied their cravings and the world in general reacted to a 
measured interest in the doctrines expounded by the de- 
parted. For the journalist it was a field day of hypocritical 
ami extravagant utterance. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 1924 



Wheat and Chaff 

H 
SI 
By Nathaniel Anderson 

.. m 

mSSSM 'SSg.SSSSSt- z S'« :; SfSMa »-g ;T s sfaaa ? i» «««« "■ SB 

TWO leaders have passed away, — Woodrow Wilson and 
Nikolai Lenin. They have reached the stopping places 
in this life as marked by the Great Reaper, who. however, 
has not been able to remove the spirit of the character 
and deeds of the ex-President of the American Republics 
nor the institution created by the baneful Russian Premier. 
Both these giants were opinionated. If Wilson compro- 
mised abroad, the chances are he willed to do so; at least 
he showed no such inclination at home. Lenin backed down 
in Russia from compulsion. The intelligence of America's 
idol worked with his heart, while the Russian Soviet was 
soulless. Everything pertaining to these two men has been 
analyzed over the world, and it would be a foolish .Ameri- 
can who would exchange the memory of Woodrow Wilson 
for that of the Russian tyrant, as fresh upon us, or as fu- 
ture generations will see it. 

* * * 

Dr. Henry Van Dyke has resigned from his pastorate in 
New York because he refuses to dance gaily on the tra- 
ditions of the past. He calls himself a liberalist. in con- 
tradistinction to a literalist. Dr. Van Dyke takes a sane 
course in the religious controversy between the funda- 
mentalists and the modernists. 

To use our own words, the doctor thinks about like this: 
because the Bible has been taken too literally, gives no 
permission to create monkey-shines on the sacred foun- 
dation of the church. 

By the way. Dr. Van Dyke stands high in literature. 
Have you read him? 

"Fitzsimmons did not discover left to solar plexus !" What 
do you know about that? Dan Hicky. who taught Lanky 
Bob how to box, and who taught yours truly some, gives 
the above bit of information in the history of fisticuffs. 
Mr. Hickey, who is now instructor of the New York Ath- 
letic Club, says that a boy in a street fight invented the 
famous blow. 

The wire that sends out the revelation says also that 
Mr. Daniel Hickey was at one time middle weight cham- 
pion of Australia. Whew! I didn't know that when I boxed 
with him, and am glad he did not use the S. P. on me. 

* # # 

At the Studio Apartments up on Franklin street is to 
be found the artistic landlady. Certain rooms she has arc 
held for musicians only, others again for singers, and those 
for painters are specialized. Nothing can induce her to 
break her arrangement of things. She pulled out of her 
back yard an old sewer pipe, colored it green, and painted 
thereon a beautiful lily. 

Like all people artistically inclined, eccentricity rides 
her actions. She switches the tapestries and chairs from 
room to room; your bed-clothes are often appropriated sud- 
denly. Perhaps the sufferer will get a tea-pot or dish in 
return for his loss. Perhaps not. 

* * * 

It maybe just gentlemanly qualities, or perchance ad- 
vanced business methods that are responsible, but you go 
into a certain antique shop on Sutter above Van Ness, 
and look around to your heart's content without molesta- 
tion. Nobody will ask you if you want anything, and those 
in charge never speak until spoken to by you. The pro- 
prietors are very successful merchants in tlie store where 
this procedure takes place. Is it psychology? If it is, it 
is much different from the noisy brand the 'lecturers dole 
out in the halls. 



Supervisor James B. McSheehy had to "pull," they say, 
to get the San Francisco Hospital to take in Mary Giner, 
suffering with a fractured elbow. Ernest Windhoevel, 75 
years old, was refused admission, and shortly after fell on 
the street, from his infliction, bronchial pneumonia and 
chronic heart trouble. His death followed. James Morton 
was sent away from the Harbor Emergency Hospital as 
drunk. He was put in jail for ten hours, which was, no 
doubt, wonderful for his double lobar pneumonia, the cause 
of his death. 

There are others who are mentioned in San Francisco 
who got this kind of slap in the face from Fate. How 
can the rest of the mothers' sons of us tell in this civiliza- 
tion whether at the finish the city we happen to be in 
will give us needed aid. or if any McSheehys will be on 
hand ? 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



Illlllllllllllllllllllllllflllilil 

all die 




when business 
or pleasure 
takes you 
.Prom home 

Tickets to all points 
East via the route 
of scenic surprises 
including^ 

GrandCanyon 

National Park 

Tell us where you wantr 
to go and we will sub- 
mit suggested itinerary 

15. I). Johnson, Div. Pass. Agent, (sol Market St., or 
Market Street Perry. ISoth Phones: Sutter 7600. San Francisco 




HOMES 



liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 
READY to ERECT 
on Your Property 



$300up 



3s SIMPLEX UNIT CONSTRUCTION CO. 

106 llth Strict, San Francisco 



February 16. 1024 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



I M«K.»»»»«:»«;8«»;»«»<«!» It 1! It It 11 It It It 1! :M )! K !! lit H >< »U Mill 1 



Attractive Contrasts at Auto Show J* 

i a a a a a a a a it a it a a a a 11 a lltll a it it a it a It a it ;i 1! 8 )( It it it it it a it it it it it it: It it it :lt it, a it it it ilt it 8 it a 'It it it: a a la 'it. a it it it it. 8 aillti 




JHE latest models for speed in vehicular trans- 
iportation, glittering in all the new shades that 
Motordom lias approved for the season, from 
the raciest little runabout to the dignified con- 
ventionality of the most elegant limousine, in 
a setting of Old Venetian decorations and draperies, — 
what a significant contrast in tastes and times do we find 
at the Automobile Show, opening today in the Auditorium! 
The appeal of contrast and the wide scope that the field 
of Italian color gives to a scheme of decoration, was in 
the mind of Manager Wahlgreen, in the forming of his 
ideas for the present show. And no-one could carry out 
this fascinating plan more successfully than he. Artists un- 
der his direction have painstakingly gone through their 
files for beautiful studies in Italian architecture and deco- 
rative designs, and the whole monumental domed and bal- 
conied Auditorium expresses a united scheme of colorful 
and striking features. Aside from the engagement of Signor 



"Well, the decorations alone cost $30,000. I expect that, 
with the value of the exhibits included, it will run close 
to $2,000,000." 

In addition to the thousands of prospective automobile 
purchasers who will crowd the show during the next eight 
days, there are hundreds of dealers, distributors and fac- 
tory men from all parts of the West and from the manu- 
facturing capitals of the Mid-West and East foregathered 
here to attend the big show and to gain the Pacific Coast 
reaction to the new models. Everything that was shown as 
"surprise" material at the New York and Chicago shows 
and. in addition, some new offerings both by factories and 
distributors, are being' exhibited here. 

Because of the fact that there has been much talk of 
the balloon tires and the four-wheel brake — the latter of 
varying types — both before and after the New York and 
Chicago shows, it is believed here that San Francisco's 
big eight-day event will attract more attention from the 




Wills-Saiiite Chiin 



'assenger Sedan, $4155 P.O.B. San 
Francisco 



Wills-Sainte Claire 4-door Brougham, $4155, F.O.B. San 
Francisco 



Guiseppe Creature as band master, a troupe of Venetian 
troubadors saunter about the exhibits, strumming Italian 
melodies on guitars and mandolins. The whole Pacific 
Coast is interested, and this exposition will be made the 
motif for numerous trade meetings, dinners, conventions, 
and trade-get-togethers. 



San Francisco's big annual exposition of motor cars — 
the eighth annual Pacific Automobile Show — opens today 
for an eight-day run with what is declared to be the hnest 
assemblage of new motor products ever gathered together 
under one roof in the West. 

Spectacular in specifications, the decorations being de- 
clared the most beautiful which have ever backgrounded 
any of the many striking shows of this kind offered in San 
Francisco, the show is being described as the "most beau- 
tiful in America." 

New cars, new trucks, new accessories and. above all. 
new attachments for cars — notably the four-wheel brakes 
and the much-praised balloon tires -are to be noted at 
the show, which is being held as usual in the Exposition 
Auditorium under the management of George \. Wahlgreen 
with the sanction ^i the Motor Car Dealers Association 
of San Francisco. 

Asked as to the value of the show. Manager Wahlgreen 
saiil : 



standpoint of sheer beauty of show and the display of spe- 
cial designs in custom-built cars than from the standard 
trade angle. 

"In other words," as Manager Wahlgreen said, "the show- 
here is something more than a mere big exposition of new 
models for the benefit of manufacturers, distributors and 
dealers. The dealers and distributors, of course, are vital- 
ly interested. They're here from all sections of the West. 
The manufacturers, too, have sent their representatives 
here from Chicago, Detroit. Toledo. Indianapolis and other 
factory centers. But our main stay will be the crowds — 
the 'man of the street' who. though he has a car. likely wants 
another of the newest and latest pattern and visits this 
show in order to select it." 

Thus the huge sum which has been spent for decora- 
tions and music are designed directly to please the lay- 
man — the car buyer. — it is made plain, and so that it will 
be an exposition not merely an exhibition; not just a huge 
department store of cars, but a vertible show of them. 

Signor Guiseppe Creatore, famous Italian bandmaster, 
who made such a hit with San Francisco people during the 
Panama-Pacific Exposition, today swung a typically Crea- 
torish baton over Payson's band as guest conductor, and 
thus an added touch of Italy was given the beautiful deco- 
rations which are all done with a Venetian motif. No pret- 
tier or more elaborate setting has ever been seen in the 
great auditorium, it was being asserted today. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 1924 




Rolls-Royce Roadster with inside lever. Delivered, San Fran- 
cisco, $12,377.50. 



Rolls-Royce Salamanca Cabriolet (Collapsible). Delivered, 
San Francisco, $14,582.50. 



Special Exhibit during the Automobile Show to be held at the Rolls-Royce Local Branch, 928 Van Ness Avenue 



Though the show opens this morning at 10. on other 
days (except Washington's Birthday) it will not open till 
noon. No special occasion is set aside for today except 
the opening, but tomorrow will be fixed for Bay District 
Dav and Monday will be San Joaquin Valley Day. There- 
after the "specials" follow: Tuesday — Sacramento Valley; 
\Yednesdav — Santa Clara Yallev and Italian day ; Thurs- 



Plans for 1924 by Organized Motorists 

To foster adoption of a sound and equitable financial 
plan for completing California's state system of highways 
at the earliest possible date. 

To secure elimination of the more dangerous railroad 
grade crossings in Northern and Central California and 
to reduce the traffic hazard at others. 




1924 Itiiii-k Country Club Special on display for the first time 
at the San Francisco Auto Show. 



1924 Model No. 55 — 5 Passenger Buiek with wire wheels 



day — Society day and night; Friday — Washington's Birth- 
day ; Saturday — Sonoma Valley Da} - . 

On all these special days, it is anticipated by the man- 
agement, visitors from the various valleys will appear and 
make themselves known by special banners, parades, func- 
tions or whatever they may have planned. 



To minimize the number of automobile fatalities in the 
State, now averaging 100 per month, by extension of the 
public safety plan of the Association to all cities in North- 
ern and Central California facing a serious traffic problem. 

To support legislation to obtain 100 per cent Federal 
aid for construction of primary transcontinental highways 




Jordan 4 Passenger Blue Hoy. Price $2:530, F.O.Ii. San Fran- 
cisco. Chase Morrill Co., Xo. 1301 Van Xess Ave. 



Jordan four door Brougham. Price $2085, F.O.I?. San Fran- 
cisco. Clia.se Morrill Co., Xo. 1301 Van Xess Ave. 



February \C. 1024 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




How I Handle a Prospect With a Used Car 



By W. J. (Dan) Boone 



^ hen a fellow drives up with a last vear's 

can. 
And quietly asks for the Used Car Man, 
My heart commences to flutter and thump, 
Because I've a feeling I'm due for a bump. 

I examine the car — as do most good buyers — 
Look at the paint and kick all the tires 
1 look wise and long, and raise up the hood, 
And then shake my head that the thing's 
not much good. 

My prospect is telling me, all of the while, 
Of condition near perfect, and many a mile 
That still is left in this wonderful car, 
That is better today than ever, by far. 

I point to a fender that hit a fence post, 

I show him the tires (of these he can't boast) 

There's a hole in the top where it once hit a 

tree, 
While axle and steering look twisted to me. 

But he's neither undaunted, nor is he dis- 
mayed. 

He tells me how much for this auto he paid. 

With tears in his eyes he pleads and he 
moans, 

"They don't build no more, like this one," he 
groans. 

I look at him now and with softening gaze. 
I see his sad plight through the mist and the 

haze. 
Each moment to him is sadder by far. 
For the poor fellow was S( ) attached to his 

car. 



But the troublesome world keeps pushing 

right on, 
It's battle all da) whether lost or half won. 
For the man w ho is taking a used-car in trade 
Is quite apt to give to his prospect a shade. 




At last I state clearly just how I will deal, 

There's a gasp of astonishment, look of ap- 
peal, 

"Why man you are joking. You don't mean 
to say 

For MY auto that's all you are willing to 
pay." 

"In the very next block a firm offered me 
Almost twice as much more and one tire free. 
They'd throw in a bumper, a spotlight and 

lock 
And I think, by insisting, they'd give me a 

clock." 

"The trouble is you haven't honestly weighed 
The worth of my car, you are taking in trade, 
Why look in the Blue Book which tells you 

the story 
And place my good car in the same category." 

We continue to argue and gesture and scold, 
I talk of my new car, he praises his old. 
And by warping my judgment and better 

sense too, 
He sells me his old car, and then buys my 

new. 

The old car is painted, retired, rebored, 

I found <>n inspection the cylinders scored, 
We insured it and stored it and paid all the 

bills, 
(This deal and some others quite gave me the 

chills). 

We paid a commission for finally selling, 
It was high time, for our losses were swelling, 
But we'd sold a new car — had conquered our 

goal, 
Our factory was happy, but we're in the hole. 

Now this is the story of many a trade. 

1 if many transactions much better not made. 

We sign off and swear off "it's wrong, doc> 

not pay," 
And do it all over again the next day. 



1-' 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 1924 




Stutz Speedway Four — Sport Coupe — Four Passenger 
$2895 F.O.B. San Francisco 

across the Western States which are sparsely settled and 
which contain large areas of non-taxable public land. 

To seek Federal aid to assist in maintaining transcon- 
tinental highways, partially or wholly constructed by the 
Government, in the poorer western states unable to raise 
adequate funds for such maintenance. 

To work for passage of the bill now pending before 



The Stutz Special Six Roadster- 
92390 F.O.B. San 



-Two-Three Passeng 
Francisco 



justification. This tax cost the motorists of the country 
$155,000,000 in 1923. 

The plans are scheduled for accomplishment by the Cali- 
fornia State Automobile Association under the regime of 
W. T. Sesnon, capitalist and civic leader, who was re- 
cently elected President of the California State Automobile 
Association. 




The Stutz Special Six — Touralmut — Five 
$2575 F.O.B. San Francisco 



Passenger 



Congress appropriating $7,500,000 for a three-year pro- 
gram of Federal road construction in the national parks 
and to seek abolition of the tolls collected from motorists 
entering the national playgrounds, which money now goes 
into the treasury and becomes a part of general funds used 
to maintain the national government. 

To assist in the movement to abolish the Federal excise 
tax of five per cent on automobiles, tires, accessories and 
parts, a war measure which is being continued without 



The Stutz Speedway Six — Sport Brohm — Five Passenger 
$3700 F.O.B. San Francisco 

No Further Aid for Nevada 
In view of the policy of the United States Government 
as expressed recently in a speech before the American As- 
sociation of State Highway Officials in New Orleans by 
Thomas H. McDonald. Chief of Bureau of Public Roads 
of the Department of Agriculture, the Hoard determined 
not to offer any further sums from its trust funds to the 
State of Nevada for improvement. Mr. MacDonald ex- 
pressed the conviction that no stale should accept outside 




Star Sedan, $900 F.O.B. San Francisco 



Star Sport Touring, $798 F.O.B. San Francisco 



February 16, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



aid for highway construction if such aid placed the state 
under any obligation, actual or implied, to build certain 
sections of road. 

Nevada receives about $7 from the Federal Government 
for every dollar made available by the State or (•(■unties 
with the result that the Association's $50,000, which is in 
escrow in Reno to aid certain projects, commanded about 
$350,000 from the Federal Government for highway im- 
provements. The Government Road Bureau, however, 
does not like to have its aid met from sources other than 
public revenue. 

* * * 

The Rollin Automobile — T. E. McMeans, Agent 
Anyone who has had to do with the operation of a four 
cylinder car knows that it has been practically impossible 

to get the motor to "tick" regularly and function without 
"motor limp," especially at low motor speeds. The absence 
of this defect in the Rollin will especially appeal to those 
men and women drivers who want a highly refined four 
cylinder car from which has been eliminated what might 
be termed the one fundamental objection — vibration. 

With a motor which many leaders in automotive engi- 
neering have approved in highest terms — a motor possess- 
ing sturdiness. smoothness, unusual gas economy and po- 
tential longevity, what can be said of related units which 




A Sport Chevrolet which sells completely equipped with nickel 
trimmings, disc wheels ;ith1 other accessories for $708, F.O.B. 
San Francisco. Many are finding the Chevrolet an ideal car 
for town and short trips, although owning large expensive 
machines, 

contribute to the general chassis design? Every structural 
feature will be found to be as good in its way as the motor. 
From radiator to tail lamp no expense has been spared to 
make the Rollin worthy of the good repute of every man 
in the organization who has heartily seconded and ap- 
proved its policy of sacrificing nothing in time, effort and 
dollars to make the Rollin the highest attainable in motor 
car excellence. 

The following features are embodied in the new Rollin 
automobile : 

Standard equipment, 

Balloon Tires, 

4-Wheel I '.rakes. 

Internal Expansion, 

Special Economical Carburetion, 

Twenty-five to Thirtj Miles per Gallon of Gasoline. 

* * * 

Wendover Cut-off Becoming a Reality 

The long cherished dream of an unbroken transconti- 
nental highway leading directly into Northern and Cen- 
tral California is soon to become a definite reality. 

When work now going forward rapidly on the VVend- 
over I m oil wesl of Salt Lake City is completed, the prob- 
lem of highwa} transportation across the salt marshes and 
mud flats of western Utah will be permanently solved. 




The Stearns Knight line is complete and mounted on hoth 
4 and 6 cylinder chassis. Without douht the hest huilt 
sleeve valve motor car in America. $3950 Fully equipped, 
F.O.B. San Francisco. 

This is the message brought back to California by A. E. 
f.oder, manager of the Good Roads Bureau of the Califor- 
nia State Automobile Association, when he returned from 
an inspection of the Victory Highway project. In com- 
pany with the contractors and Howard C. Means, chief 
engineer of the Utah Road Commission. Coder made a 
personal inspection of the work being done in western 

Utah. 

* * * 

Four-Wheel Brakes 

Despite the hundreds of automobile accidents that oc- 
cur every day and the consistency with which poor brakes 
contribute to the casualties, up to the time that 250,000 
cars with 4-Wheel Brakes were on the road NOT ONE 
fatal accident had been reported against such a car from 
any cause whatsoever. < >f course accidents will continue 
to happen wherever cars are driven — or ox-carts for that 
matter. But, 4-Wheel Brakes, even when lacking what we 
consider perfection in design or installation have proved 
to be the greatest preventor of accidents ever built into 
a motor car. Under any test you can devise, the poorest 
set of 4-Wheel Brakes you can find will prove just twice 
as efficient as two of the same kind on the same car. And 
a perfect set of 4-Wheel Brakes will add more than twice 
the safety factor. 

The difference in leverage exerted by the foot pedal, ap- 
plies the rear set slightly in advance of front — but while this 
also is advisable it is not imperative and it is a fact that 
front brakes alone are better brakes and more efficient 
than rear alone. 

So it really doesn't matter if front and rear engage at 




Cadillac V-63 Sedan — Five Passenger*. Price F.O.B. S45SO, 
freight and war tax paid. This rac has the new harmonised 

V. type eight cylinder motor and Cadillac mechanical 4-whccl 

brakes. Don Lee is breaking all -ale records with this new 

Cadillac. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 1924 



the same time, or front quicker than rear, you still have 
the best brakes vou ever operated and the greatest safety 
assurance for yourself, your family and your property ever 
built into a motor car. 




Kollin Touring Car De Luxe, $1175 F.O.B. San Francisco. 
Standard Equipment — Balloon Tires, Internal Expanding 
Four Wliee] Brakes, Special Economical Carburetion, 25-30 
Miles Per Gallon. 

There are still a lew long beards left in Sacramento — 
not all the forty-nine whiskers of the famous celebration 
two years ago have been razed by the barbers. 

This was the information contained in a letter received 
by George A. Wahlgreen. manager of the San Francisco 
automobile show, from J. W. Morshead of the Sacramento 
Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Morshead wrote that an effort 
is now being made to round up all possible members of 
the Whiskerino Club and bring them to San Francisco for 
the automobile show on Sacramento Day, which falls on 
next Tuesday. . 




Rollin Three Passenger Coupe Roadster 
$1395 F.O.B. San Francisco 

Those who have no chin foliage to expose to the crisp 
salt air of San Francisco will wear their plug hats, fancy 
vests, snappy boots and flowing latin-quarter scarfs, it is 
intimated. Thus an old time touch — clothes of a period 




HE/4RPIT? 




— Tones had a terrible toothache, and happening to run 
across an old friend who had just returned from his honey- 
moon with a young and charming wife, he asked him if 
he knew a cure for it. "Look here, old chap," said his friend. 
"I had a toothache last week. When I went home my wife 
kissed me, and, do you know, it cured it completely. Why 
don't you try it?" "That's a fine idea." said Jones. "Is your 
wife at home now ?" 



Rollin Five Passenger Sedan, $1495, F.O.B. San Francisco. 
Standard Equipment — Balloon Tires, Internal Expanding 
Four AVlieel Brakes, Special Economical Carburetion, 25-30 
Mills Per Gallon. 

Ion ' before automobiles were even dreamed of — will be 
lent an exposition featured by the latest models of 1924 
motor car creations. 



— A certain very dignified bishop, strolling along one 
day, heard three costermongers engaged in rather a 
heated argument. The language was such that the prelate 
felt compelled to stop and remonstrate. "My good men," 
he said gravely, "tell me. where did you learn to swear 
like that?" "Lor luv-yer. guv'nor," replied one, slapping 
the bishop genially on the shoulder, "yer can't learn it. It's 
a gift." 

— The hospital nurse smoothed the sufferer's pillow. 
He had only been admitted that morning, and now he 
looked up at her pleadingly. "An' phwat did ye say the 
docthor's name was. nurse?" he asked. "Dr. Kilpatrick." 
was the reply/ The sufferer winced and pulled a wry face. 
"That settles it." he said. "That doctor won't get no 
chance to operate on me." "Why not?" asked the nurse, 
in surprise. "He's a very clever man." "That's as may 
lie." replied the patient. "But my name happens to be 
Patrick." 



— He had just returned home from a convivial evening 
with some pals, to be met at the door by his wife. "Where 
have you been?" she demanded. "I've been at Smiths' 
party, my dear." he replied, beaming at her. "You have 
not." she snorted. "1 say I have," he said. "I am sure you 
have not," she insisted; "I've been there myself, so I know 
you were not there." "Well, anyhow." he answered in 
resigned tones, "it's the tale I've made up, so I'm going 
to stick to it." 



— Jones was walking along the street, wearing a verv 
glum expression on his usually cheerful countenance, when 
he was accosted bv his friend BroWn. "Hello, old man!" 
exclaimed the latter. "You're looking verv down in the 
mouth. What's the matter?" "Yesterday." said Jones. "I 
refuser 1 , a poor woman a request for a loan, and in conse- 
quence of my act I passed a sleepless night. The tones of 
her voice were ringing in my ears the whole evening." 
"Your softness of heart docs you credit." said Brown. 
"\\ ho was the woman?" "My wife." was the sad reply. 



— ( )ne of our leading dramatists was leaving the stage 
when he saw a charlady engaged in scrubbing one of the 
corridors. The rehearsal of his new play had gone well, and 
he felt pleased with the world. He stopped and said. "How 
would you like to go to a theater tomorrow- night?" She 
looked up at him and smiled. "Get another night off and 
make it Wednesday," she said. 



— A story used to be told regarding Auditor Boyle, of 
whom it was recorded that he was never absent from his 
post, (hi this particular day. however, he chanced to be 
absent. "Yes, sir." said the door-keeper when questioned 
on the matter, "Mr. Boyle has gone to a funeral, and it's 
the only day's pleasure he's had for two years." 



February 16, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 




::t«i::!l«!«:5insJ!SS If If* 






A Lady of the Legion 



By Eleanore F. Ross 



gg2gggggggg3.K.SJi § 8 ffaagggs 




"In tlie courage of women, 
Rests the fate of Nations." 

— Elizabeth (Queen of Greece). 

AT first glance, one would not associate the attribute 
of courage in connection with the building of the 
California Palace of the Legion of Honor; one might 
question the appropriateness of this quotation inscribed by 
the (now) deposed Queen of Greece, to the donor of the 
Palace. With a plentitude of money at one's disposal 
wherewith to visit foreign lands, to investigate artistic 
conditions, to interest the European Governments, to 
study the original structure in France of which the Cali- 
fornia Palace is a replica, and to retain the greatest archi- 
tects for its planning, would seem more a labor of love, 
particularly as regards its creators, Mr. and Mrs. Adolph 
Spreckels, whose names have for so many years been 
synonymous with art in San Francisco. But it is a proven 
fact that "labors of love" almost always necessitate the 
quality of courage as well as earnest and persistent en- 
deavor. 

Aside from the mental and physical labor that the 
building' of this edifice has entailed, a certain amount of 
moral courage must be manifest for the erecting of a 
structure costing $2,000,000 or more ; builded as a me- 
morial to the soldier dead of the United States; to be 
filled with notable art treasures of the world, which is 
to contain a magnificent pipe organ and music library 
costing $100,000, the gift of the late John D. Spreckels; 
a theater devoted only to entertainments of the higher 
order, and lastly, to locate this architectural fabric in a 
community whose youth and inexperience are its most 
pronounced characteristics. 

Realizing this, 1 anticipated my visit in company with 
other journalistic women, to Mrs. Spreckel's mansion last 
Monday, with some curiosity as to what manner of wo- 
man she might be. I found her rather a Queen herself, 
surrounded by the many gifts which European Royalty 



had bestowed upon her, in commendation for her enter- 
prise. 

Here was the lace collar which Queen Victoria had 
given the Queen of Roumania on her wedding day ; a 
silver slipper and dainty fan worn by the Roumanian 
Queen at her first ball ; a replica in gold and precious 
stones of her crown ; a wonderful silver filagree toilet set 
and jewel casket given by the Queen of Serbia; embroid- 
eries contributed by the Serbian Government; miniatures 
on vellum of Queen Marie Antoinette and Louis the XVI. 
offered by their direct descendent, the Duchess of Ven- 
dotne. And these were only a few of many other pres- 
ents of a like and often intimate kind, impressing the be- 
holder more with an idea of the affection and admiration 
in which these Royalties hold Mrs. Spreckels, than the 
richness and value of the gifts. 

A maquette, or model of the California Palace of the 
Legion of Honor, showing its unsurpassed scenic situa- 
tion near the Golden Gate, drew our attention ; a veritable 
fairy picture of a building, seeming to rise from the blue 
sea into the blue ether, set like a jewel in an expanse 
of sapphire, as illusive and beautiful as a dream. 

"When it was exhibited in the Palace of the Legion 
of Honor in France, it drew crowds of people." said 
my companion, a close friend of Mrs. Spreckels; "They 
all exclaimed over its appealing beauty, some of them 
remarking: 'Why it is like the fairy isles that we read of 
when we were children !' " 

* * * 

And this dream of beauty, this majestic memorial to 
the illustrious dead, is the consumation of an idea that 
came to Mrs. Spreckels while she was engaged in war 
work in Europe; an idea that grew in magnitude as time 
went on, until this year its material demonstration will 
be completed in all its detail and significance, the com- 
memoration not only of manly American bravery, but 
womanly appreciation of that bravery, and a desire to 
foster art in its highest forms in this immature but en- 
thusiastic community of otir's. 




National Close-Coupled Pour-Passenger Sedan 
$8650, San Francis* •■> 

Decidedly one of the smallest models thai National has 
ever produced. To the dependable National chassis lias been 
fitted the latest mode ol closed car design and complete usa- 
bility lot (our persons. Rquallj appropos for a transconti- 
nental jaunt or the rigid requirements of the formal occasion. 



National Newport Pour Passenger Phaeton, 

S;5."».">o, San Francisco 
Ultra-distinction makes this model till' natural renter of af- 

tmtion, whether on boulevard, at the curb, at the country 
club or on the open load. The National chassis makes it 
as capable in performance as the special finish, upholsterj 
and color scheme make it unusualii beautiful. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 192-1 



DUESENBERG 

The Original Straight-Sight 
With Four Wheel HYDRAULIC Brakes 



Owing to inadequate space at the show, we are going to confine our 
exhibit to our show rooms, 1930 Van Ness Avenue, where a complete line 
of the very latest models of the Duesenberg straight eight motor cars 
will be shown. 



We will also feature, as an added attraction, a series of demonstrations 
that have never been equalled by any stock motor car in America. 

Don't overlook this opportunity of seeing this wonderful car perform. 




Dih's.miImt- straight eight 4 Passenger Touring, 
San Francisco 



7150, F.O.15. 



Duesenberg straight eight < Pn-st'iiner Touring, $7400, F.O.15. 
Sim Francisco 



FRED S. DUESENBERG 

I didn't begin with the askings. I took mv job and stuck; "You keep your lights so shining a little in front of the next!'' 

I took the chances thev wouldn't, an'now they're calling it luck They copied all they could follow, but they couldn't copy my mind. 

And they asked me how I did it, and I gave 'em the Scripture text. And I left 'em sweating and stealing a year and a half behind. 

— Rudyard Kipling in "The Mary (.Hostel'.' 




Duesenberg straight eight 3 Passenger Roadster, $7000, F.O.B. 
San Francisco 

Fred S. Duesenberg. in all probability, stands foremost in the field 
of the world's greatest automotive Engineers, having designed and built 
the largest aeroplane motor, developing 900 horse power ; the fastest 
Marine motor adapted to speed boats and Submarine chasers, during 
the World War, and his racing cars, having to their credit Gil world 
records, including a Duesenberg Racing car piloted bv Tommy Milton, 
and driven at the speed of 156 miles per hour at Ormond Beach, Fla., 
and last but not least, the performance of Jimmy Murphy in a Duesenberg 
straight eight winning the French Grand Prix fifteen 'minutes ahead of 
the second car — the only American car ever performing this feat. 



Duesenberg straight eight Sedan Limousine, S8500, F.O.B. 
Smi Francisco 

' World's first straight-eight motor — 26 H. P.; develops 103 
H.P. 4650 R. P. M. 

World's fastest car; 69 world speed records. 
World's first hydraulic four-wheel hrake stock car. 
World's most economical S cylinder car — Highway average 18 
to 2 2 miles per gal. 

World's only stock car to travel at the speed of 63 miles per hour 
for 5 consecutive hours. 




Standard Duesenberg straight eight Chassis, S5500 F.O.B. San Francisco Duesenberg straight eight Town Car, S8500 F.O.B. San Francisco 

THE DUESENBERG STRAIGHT EIGHT IS BUILT TO OUTCLASS, Ol'IMU, AND OUTLAST ANY CAR ON THE ROAD 



February 16. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



lb 



TownpSlcrier 




j> WHO THE DEVIL ART THOU 

ONE THAT WILL PLAY THE 
| PEVIL.SIRWITH YOU" 

— Shakspeare- , 



— I see that Hughes, late premier of Australia, is to speak 
here in March. He is a tunny person; deaf as a post and 
yet a great man. He pulled Australia through the war with 
much credit and could have had almost anything he wanted 

in the way of distinction. But he went out smiling, much 
nunc graciously than lots of the war premiers. As an or- 
dinary workman who attained distinction, he is worth meet- 
ing and knowing. The wealth of talent in that small coun- 
try in the North sea is a phenomenon which has never been 
explained. 

* * * 

— They seem to be always popping up and down again 
in the Supreme Court. So many new faces meet one that 
an old practitioner is almost at a loss to know the arbiters 
of his destiny. Justice Kerrigan steps out into the federal 
bench, wdiere there is a lot of work. Judge Richards be- 
comes Justice Richards of the Supreme Court and the legal 
machine waddles along again, somewhat in arrears, with 
the Justices getting no pay because the calendar is more 
than ninety days behind. There are some bad mechanics 

somewhere. 

+ % # 

— The report of the probation officer is always a most 
amazing document to me. Thus he shows his probationers 
as earning more than $86,000 and repaying defrauded mer- 
chants to the extent of more than $4000 and paying for 
families more than $7000. These figures tell the story of 
rehabilitation and show wdiat folly we commit in making 
our criminals unproductive helpless things, when the path 
to decency is apparently open in many cases. 

* * * 

— Judge Mogan raised quite a new question by his ex- 
pressed wish that a law should be passed compelling no- 
tice to the other party before a final degree is obtained, in 
divorce. As it is now, two people may live together after 
the first decree and either one of them obtain a final decree, 
even under such conditions, without the other knowing 
about it. And, really, after all. this does not seem to be 

quite fair. 

* * * 

— There is a very poor sense of dignity in some of our 
ecclesiasts. Thus one Methodist minister delivered a ser- 
mon on Sunday under the title "God's radio." That sort 
of thing is neither good wit nor appropriate religion. It 
is just as much "God's automobile" — but we hope that the 
proprietor docs not hear the language on Sunday nights 

at the Sausalito ferry. 

* * * 

Dudley Field Malone is one of the most engaging fig- 
ures in the country, lie is so good looking and has such 
an air of gentle sweetness that he would be a hard-faced 
person who would not fall for him. llis statements on the 
League of Nations are very convincing and he has the right 
attitude on the honor question. It would do us a lot of 
good to keep him here for a while. 

* * * 

— That there i- -till opportunity here as in the frontier 
days witli even greater opportunities, is shown in the tact 
that John Ray, a formerly well known Irish comedia 

been cam ing onl some of the big real estate deal- in ' >ak- 
land recently. He has operated successfully in the South 
and sees money In Oakland. He must have a sense of hu- 
mor to see money, in Oakland, not in the pockets of the 
ruling gang. 



— The policemen's ball is a city institution of large sig- 
nificance. Also the policemen are significant. To go back 
to the old days when tluy wore a frock coat with a ribbon 
round their hats, and now compare them with the almost 
distinguished wearers of evening clothes, is to tell the prog- 
ress of democracy in a half century. We are none the worse 
for the change and the police are lots better. 

* * * 

— So San Francisco has been talking with Havana over 
the radio-phone. But the conversation seems only to have 
been about the weather and kindred topics. That is well, 
n is also well that odors do not arrive via radio phone or 
there would he much greater discontent. Today the num- 
bers of Americans with business in Havana is nothing less 
than inexplicable. 

— So Sam Shortridge has gone to the bat for a fair con- 
sideration of the matter of the oil leases. I wish I had 
been in Washington to see him wag his finger. It will have 
a most impressive effect on the Senate. After a time the 
wag loses its power, but at first it is not only impressive 
it is actually terrifying. 

* * * 

— Admiral Eberle says that the Alameda base is vital. 
That may be so. but at present there seems to be very lit- 
tle life in it. The way that the projectors have managed 
the matter shows that Alameda County is still a bedroom. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Batter 0180 



Under Management CARL S. STANLEY 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Van Ness Ave., at Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 



$495.00 
1921 SEDAN 

Newly painted — perfect order — A Snap 
Owner, Box 75, This Office 



Apartment To Let 



Unfurnished 



'Mti Jones, near Bush. Modem, attractive, sunny 
4-room Apartment, hardwood floors, wall bed. 
steam beat, hot water. 



$75.00 



16 



x SSSSSSSSSS s.% = ■S.s.t 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 1924 




fgSSSSSgSSSSSSSSSSSlilSSSSIilSliSas.S'aaKfisaaLa'aaaKa.i 



R* 



■F 






mitmmm 



can sense a time when even the unravished forests will 
succumb to natural causes. Must of the felled monarchs 
are not only "ripe" but often filled with evidence of slow 
decline. True, their dissolution might take centuries, but 
their ultimate disintegration points a moral: the individual 
is nothing, the race everything. And it is heartening to 
know that the race of redwoods is on the road to preser- 
vation even if some of the sensational examples of their 
glory are passing. The flash of trout in the streams, the 
soft thunder of quail from the bush, the fragrance of easter 
lilies or lupines at their appointed seasons, will be the heri- 
tage of the generations that come after it, for all time, if 
the germ of reforestation which is being fostered by the 
California Redwood Association bears logical fruit. 

The wealth of any community is subtlely bound up in 
its forests: rainfall, irrigation, power, climate are all modi- 
fied by the hills and their covering. "I will lift up mine 
eves unto the hills, from whence cometh my help," sang 
the Hebrew poet. And it was not an idle nor even an ab- 
solutely poetical fancy. Underlying it was a deep practical 
truth which the man of affairs is slowly coming to realize. 
Let it be recorded to the honor of the California Redwood 
Association that it is one of the first in the field to trans- 
late this truth into terms of action. 



Walter P. Chrysler, 
the world, will be in 
Sh( m. 



By Charles Caldwell Dobie 

AT Fort Bragg. Mendocino county, on the grounds of 
the Union Lumber Company, there is a four acre nur- 
sery plot that is destined to mean more to future genera- 
tions of California than almost any other four acres in the 
State, unless it be a similar plot at Scotia, Humboldt coun- 
ty, owned by the Pacific Lumber Company. For at these 
two places the California Redwood Association is experi- 
menting with more than a million and a half redwood seed- 
lings with which they have inaugurated a tremendous re- 
forestation program. 

Nature herself has made valiant efforts in this same di- 
rection, and many of the redwood tracts in Mendocino 
and Humboldt counties which were first cut are almost 
completely covered with a lusty second growth of trees. 
One grove owned by the Albion Lumber Company and cut 
within the memory of some of the men still working in the 
company's sawmill, is so completely reforested that the 
novice could easily be tricked into believing it virgin tim- 
ber of smaller growth. But nature must have the most 
favorable conditions for staging a forest comeback, and the 
assistance of man insures speedy growth and superior tim- 
ber qualifications. 

From observation, and experiments with second growth 
redwoods, it takes sixty-five years for a maturity sufficient 
for profitable lumbering. With this thought in mind, the 
movement to assist nature in clothing the hills again takes 
on a poetic significance. Scarcely any of the people con- 
cerned with the planting, which has been under way since 
December 4th. will live to see its fruits, much less share 
in them. They are like sowers of. seed, knowing that they 
will never share in the harvest, yet content to live in the 
vision of plenty they will leave for others. And this vision 
extends from the man who gathers the redwood cones in 
the forest up to the very highest officials who are plan- 
ning and directing the work. 

This vear will see nearly 1000 acres replanted; next year 
3000. and so on until 1930 when the scheme will have been 
perfected, whereby the replanting will not only keep pace 
with the amount of timber annually cut down, but will 
provide an excess to ultimately cover the acreage cut in 
former years. In short, the California Redwood Associa- 
tion plans to make perpetual the forests and the lumber 
industry in its territory. This is a case of idealism and 
utility going hand in hand, the providing and unlocking of 
treasuries, the repayment to future generations a fair meas- 
ure of what has been taken from them. The activities to- 
ward this end go far beyond mere replanting: fire protec- 
tion, scientific lumbering, the fighting of tree pests — these 
are only a few of the problems to be met. Eternal vigilance 
is the price of reforestation. 

Aside from this essentially practical purpose, the Cali- 
fornia Redwood Association is meeting the sentimental de- 
mands of the community by advocating the preservation 
of strips of virgin timber along the state highway for the 
delight and wonder of those who ride through this region. 
Some of the largest and most beautiful examples of red- 
woods to be found in California are thus preserved for the 
future. That these will be added to from time to time, goes 
without saying, and even individuals who shudder at the 
idea of putting the axe to any forest giants may console 
themselves with the fact that all the essential beauties of 
the woods are in a fair way to be preserved. Birds, streams 
and game will flourish just as lustily under the shelter of 
second growth redwood as in a virgin forest. And. those 
who have the inclination to look far enough into the future 



one of the highest salaried men in 
San Francisco for the Automobile 




Heald's will give you 
— in a short time — 
this ESSENTIAL 
TRAINING which will 
enable you always to 
get a good job — at the 
highest current wages. 



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HEALD'S 



1105 Sutter St. 



ENGINEERING AND 
AUTOMOBILE SCHOOL 

San Francisco 



February 16, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



17 




EMPTY 

Oh. Little House of Pleasant Dreams, 

The dreams are fled ; 
And you are but four empty walls 

Whose soul is dead. 
The garden that was magic soil 

Is common loam. 
And there is nothing but a house 

"Which was a Home. 

Still through your windows shines the sun 

And breathes the air. 
The quaint old rugs and furniture, 

Unchang-ed, are there ; 
Yet they seem bathed in ghostly light 

Chill, pale and wan, 
For there's no warmth in any house 

Whose dreams are gone. 

Love touched you with its rosy glow 

By night and day. 
But love, with clipped and wounded wing. 

Has limped away, 
And leaves a shelter — nothing more — 

Of wood and stone, 
A Little House of Pleasant Dreams 

Whose dreams are flown! 

■ — Berton Bralev, in "Scribner's." 



THE SHY VITAMINE 

It is a shock to me to hear 

That nobody has ever seen 
The thing that science holds so dear 

And calls a vitamine. 

Strange that each weird and curious pet 
That science nurses in her arms. 

However curious we may get. 
Will not display its charms. 

Themselves unto themselves they keep. 
These darlings of the learned mind; 

Even a weasel wrapt in sleep 
Is not a rarer find. 

The atom is extremely shy. 

The giddy young electron, too, 
Although we know the how and why 

Of everything they do. 

And though when vitamines we eat, 
We know the) buck us up no end, 

Alas! we never chance to meet 
Each coy, retiring friend. 

Despite materialistic bands 

Which hold some savant minds in thrall. 
Science, it seems to me, demands 

The greatest faith of all. 

— C. E. Ik. in "Evening News," i London). 



Erroneous Stage Instructions 

By Nathaniel Anderson 

PASSING with contempt the determined quacks, there 
is always a difference between dramatic coaching and 
dramatic leaching. Firstly, you cannot train for the stage 
n homeopathic doses, and it take a little time; otherwise 
the coach will go out of his head, unless he relieves him- 
self by the method of pulling his subject around by the 
hair, which has been done according- to the testimony of 
.i well-known stage craftsman in his suit for a fifty-thou- 
sand dollar fee for this sort of work. Where money is 
not the influence that forces the genius of the coach into 
the pupil with comparative rapidity, hive often is the thing 
that does the work. A good actor loses his heart to a 
charming 1 but inexperienced actress, or vice versa. He 
wants her with him as his partner, and he sets about the 
task of improving. This goes on night and day. The in- 
structed one, because of astounding progress, is called a 
"find," until it is discovered she is only a sweetheart. 

This distinction between theatrical coaching and his- 
trionic instruction bridges a wide gap marked by studying 
for the stage and studying on it. One of the distant mile- 
posts from the goal of acting on the boards is puzzling 
over ancient literature of the drama; and struggling with 
the printed text of Shakespeare leaves you far behind the 
man who says one word of it before an audience, with the 
thrill of a costume on his back. The student of the notes 
of a Knight or a Craig can read forever and never over- 
come the advantage of a "Nathaniel." before his crowd, 
who says the apparently simple "Welcome home, Grumio !" 
and utters not much more ; but the words start the actor 
in this character's scene, through which he is bound to 
go, unless somebody cries "Fire!" That much experience 
is to his credit and benefit at a performance. Perhaps 
again tomorrow. Under direction this little "Nathaniel" is 
made as near right as time will permit. If it is the player's 
first role, and he has been through instruction for the 
drama, though he has graduated to a "Macbeth," the pre- 
diction is safe that he cannot hold his position on the stage 
or take a new one in the short space that follows before 
he is to say. "How now, old lad!" the next line. All his 
fundamentals are scowled down by the sour-faced direc- 
tor. He has learned heretofore not a tone or gesture that 
he can squeeze into the new way of the game. 

There are some good coaches away from the stage who 
know what an acknowledged director wants, but they tall 
into devious ways to make their schools pay. In piece- 
mealing acting into a system they get far from their craft, 
where each role sums up for itself, and quick interpreta- 
tion conies from high-keyed efforts in many of them. One 
large, competent part practically contains the foundation 
and the indivisible elements of this art. which eludes the 
contemplation of the unitiated until he tries himself in its 
atmosphere and movement. 



i ashier: "But. madam, you will have to be identified be- 
fore 1 can cash this check for you!" Fair Caller (blushing 
furiously): "Oh, I just hate to do it. and George would be 

dreadfully angry, km 1 have a love-letter here which de- 
scribes me fully, if you would care to see it." 



CHAS. W. HELSER RETIRES FROM WEST COAST 
LIFE 
After several successful years as vice president and 
director of the West Coast Life Insurance Company, 
Charles W. Ilelser has announced his retirement. He re- 
signs to become President of the Standard Motor Prod- 
ucts Company, the Majestic Electric Company and the 
\\ estgate Metal Products Company. The insurance com- 
pany in which he has made such a success, has just de- 
clared a dividend of 12 per cent. 



— "Well, we both got home disgracefully late." "What 
did youi wife have to say?" "Words failed her." "Mine 
hit me with the dictionary." 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 1924 




msY ( rrm 

MISS SUZANNE DE LENCLOS announced her engag f ment J^ 
Saturday to Mr. Edward Lilburn Eyre Jr. Miss de Lenclo 
is the daughter of Mme. Edmond de Lenclos of Pans and 
a member of one of the oldest families in France. ™£ 
Eyre is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward ^huni Eyre 
of San Francisco and Menlo Park and a pother of Mr 
Atherton Eyre. On his mother's side he is a Sia nc 'son 
of the late Mr. and Mrs. Faxon Atherton. who were among 
the first residents of Menlo Park. Mr. Eyre's family con- 
nections include many of the leading members of society 
both in town and on the peninsula. He is a nephew or 
the late Mrs. Percy Selby. Mrs. Rathbone, Mr. Faxon Ath- 
erton, Mrs. Richard Girvin, Miss Mary Eyre and Mr. Peiry 
and Mr. Robert Eyre. His cousins include many ot tne 
ramifications of those families, all of whom are prominently 
identified with the social life of California. 
MRS BLANCHE KELLEHER H1XON of Pasadena and Mr. 
Spencer Grant of this city have announced their engage- 
ment. The bride-to-be spent her girlhood in San Francisco 
and aftei her marriage to Mr. George C. Hixon of Chicago 
and Philadelphia lived in the East. Since the passing of 
her husband several years ago she has returned to Cali- 
fornia and lives in Pasadena. Mrs. Hixon is prominently 
connected in the southern part of the state, where her 
sister and brother, Mrs. Mortimer Byron McNulty and Mr. 
Joseph H Kelleher, also reside. Mr. Grant is well known 
in San Francisco, both in social and financial circles. He 
is a brother of Mrs. Robert Clay Bolton and is a member 
of the Bohemian Club and San Francisco Golf and Coun- 
try Club. The wedding will be an event of April. 
MISS HELEN JACKSON, the daughter of A. C. Jackson of San 
Francisco, was married to Paul P. Young of San Francisco 
Tuesday at St. Mary's Paulist Church before a small group 
of relatives and friends. Later there was an informal re- 
ception at the home of Jackson. The bride's only attendant 
was Miss Gladys Quarre. and Alec Young was his brother's 
best man. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Al- 
exander J. Y'oung. 
MISS JEAN CLIFT SEARLES became the bride of M. Jean 
Delattre-Seguy at an attractive wedding solemnized Tues- 
day at the residence of the bride's mother. Mrs. Mailler 
Searles, in Piedmont. The ceremony was performed at 4:30 
o'clock. Reverend Alexander Allen of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church officiating. Miss Emily Clift Searles was her sis- 
ter's maid of honor and only bridal attendant. Mr. Frank 
L. Belknap of Chicago was the best man. Only relatives 
and a very few intimate friends were guests at the 
wedding. The ceremony was followed by a buffet supper. 
No entertaining has been done for the bride owing to the 
death of her father. Mrs. Delattre-Seguy is the daughter 
of Mrs. Mailler Searles of Piedmont and the late Mr. 
Searles. After a brief honeymoon through the southern part 
of the state M. Delattre-Seguy and his bride will go to 
Chicago, where they will make their home for a time. 

LUXOHEOXS 

MRS. LEON ROOS gave a handsome luncheon Monday after- 
noon in her Jackson street home in honor of Madam Roos, 
M. and Madam Roos will leave on Saturday for New York 
and will sail on the Olympic March 1. 

MRS. ATHERTON MACONDRAY. whose marriage to Mr. Wil- 
liam Otis Edmands will be an event of February 26, was 
entertained at a luncheon Tuesday afternoon by Mrs. Grant 
Selfridge. The affair was held at the home of the hostess 
in Green street and was enjoyed by 11 guests. 

MISS SUZANNE DE LENCLOS and her fiance. Mr. Edward E. 
Eyre, were entertained at a luncheon Tuesday afternoon by 
Miss Mary Eyre. The party was held at the San Fran- 
cisco Golf and Country Club at Ingleside. 

MRS. BRENT TANNER, who is visiting here from the Atlantic 
Coast, was guest of honor of Mrs. Alfred Ghirardelli at a 
luncheon Friday afternoon. The affair will be held at the 
Ghirardelli residence at Scott street and Pacific avenue. 

MRS. SAMUEL POND gave a large luncheon at her home in 
Scott street in honor of five of the season's debutantes and 
a group of older women. The debutantes for whom the 
affair was given were Miss Isabelle Bishop. Miss Sophia 
Brownell, Miss Idabelle Wheaton, Miss Millie McBryde and 
Miss Florence Welch, 



MRS. SAMUEL PAUSON and Mrs. Frederick Hihn will give 
a luncheon party on March 3 in honor of Miss Leonore 
Fitzgibbon. who is to be married to Brooke Mohun after 
Easter. 
MRS. WILLIAM BREEZE was hostess to a little group of 
friends at an attractive luncheon given last Friday at the 
Francisca Club. Some of her guests were Mrs. Andrew 
Griffin. Mrs. Reginald Knight Smith. Mrs. Cullen F. Welty, 
Mrs. Duane Bliss and Mrs. Haldimand Putnam Young. 
MR. JAMES D. PHELAN entertained a large group at lunch- 
eon Sunday afternoon in honor of Mr. William Gwin Jr. 
The affair was held at Montalvo, the country home of the 
host at Saratoga, and following the luncheon Mr. Gwin 
entertained the guests at a concert. A number of those 
in the party spent the week end at Montalvo. 
MRS. BRENT TANNER, who is visiting here from her home 
in the East, was the incentive for a luncheon given Mon- 
day by Miss Marion Zeile. The party was given at the Fair- 
mont Hotel. 
MISS MARY LOUISE MICHAELS, who is one of the most 
extensively entertained of the several engaged girls whose 
marriages will lie events of the early spring, was the hon- 
ored guest at a luncheon which Mrs. Charles C. Moore gave 
Wednesday. The affair was held at the Francisca Club. 
Mrs. Moore will again entertain at a large luncheon on 
February 26. 
MISS AILEEN McNUTT entertained a group of the debutantes 

at luncheon at the Francisca Club on Thursday. 
MRS. BOWIE DETRICK entertained her friends at a luncheon 

party on Thursday at the Fairmont Hotel. 
MRS. CORNELIUS V. WHITNEY, one of the notable brides 
in New York last fall, attracted much admiration Monday 
with a party of visiting friends from New York, lunching 
at the Hotel St. Francis. She was Miss Marie Norton and 
her marriage to the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Payne 
Whitney was a big event in New York society. 
MRS. FREDERICK McNEAR was hostess to her friends at a 
luncheon party given in honor of Mrs. W. S. Porter and 
Mrs. Charles McCormick on Thursday. 
MRS. JAMES FLOOD was hostess at a large luncheon on Fri- 
day, the affair having been held at the Flood residence 
in Broadway. 

TEAS 
MRS. JAMES LICE SCHLESINGER entertained at a bridge tea 
Wednesday afternoon at her home in Vallejo street in joint 
honor of Mrs. Richard Sehlesinger and Miss Katherine 
Mackall. the bride-elect of Mr. William Elie Jason Jr. Mrs. 
Sehlesinger prior to her recent marriage was Miss Ruth 
Whitney. 
MRS. MARVIN HIGGINS gave a large tea Tuesday at the 
Fairmont in honor of Mrs. Everett W. Wilson, who, with 
Mr. Wilson, has recently returned to San Francisco after 
an extended absence. The Wilsons made their home in 
Manila for two and a half years, where Mr. Wilson was 
connected with the government banks. After resigning from 
the position he held, he and Mrs. Wilson made a trip around 
the world and have just returned to San Francisco. 
MRS. EDWARD E. YOUNG entertained at a musicale on Mon- 
day evening at her home in Presidio Terrace. The affair 
was aiven in honor of Mrs. Eleanor Hazzard Peocock of 
Honolulu, who is visiting here from her home in the is- 
lands. There were about a hundred guests at the affair. 
MPS. FREDERICK S. MYRTLE gave a tea on Tuesday at her 
home in Ross Valley in honor of her cousin, Mrs. Gregory 
.lone?, who formerly lived in Southern California. 
MRS. CHARLES H. SHIELDS was hostess at an informal tea 
given Monday afternoon at her home in Van Ness avenue, 
when she entertained a group of friends from town and 
across the bay. Assisting the hostess in receiving was her 
mother, Mrs. Charles A. Bennet. Mrs. Thomas H. Williams 
presided at the tea table. There were fifty guests included 
in Mrs. Shield's hospitality. 
MISS ISABELLE CREED, Miss Dorothy de Veuve and Miss 
Helen Weir will be hostesses at a large tea this Saturday. 
The affair will be held at the home of Miss Creed's par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Wiggington Creed, in Piedmont, and will 
be attended by 2011 members of the sub-debutante set. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

650 Itnsh Street, Between Powell unit Stockton, San Franolsoo 
Telephone Sutter 35G0 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



February 16, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



19 



Miss ISABELLA BISHOP was hostess at a tea on Frld 

honor ot Mis^ ; , ma Piingle who is to be married to 
Mr. George MacDonald on March 12. 

MRS. ARTHUR FINNEMORE entertained at a children's party 
on Friday afternoon. The affair was in honor of her young 
daughter and the partj was held at the Fennimore home. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM ROTH entertained at a small din- 
ner Tuesday evening at the Matson home in Jackson street, 
where they are visiting at present. 

MISS INEZ MACONDRAY, who will leave [or the Atlantic 
Coast February 2:!. will be honored by .Miss Mary Emma 
Flood at a dinner on February 21. The affair will lie held 
at the James Flood residence in Broadway. Miss Macondray 
will accompany her aunt. Mrs. Macondray Moore, to Eu- 
rope, and they will sail for the Old World on March 1. 

MRS. GUNTHER entertained at a dinner Wednesday eve- 
ning at Taits, when she made Miss Suzanne de Lenclos and 
her fiance. Mr. Edward E. Eyre, her guests of honor. 

CAPTAIN AND MRS. THOMAS D. PARKER gave a dinner 
Tuesday night at the Woman's Athletic Club and later, with 
their guests, attended the Symphonic Ensemble concert at 
the Bohemian Club. Their guests were Mr. and Mrs. Le- 
land Lathrop, Mr. Leland Lathrop Jr. and Mr. and Mrs. 
Sydney Van Wyck. 

MR. AND MRS. BRENT TANNER gave a handsome dinner 
party at the Henshaw apartments on Tuesday evening, one 
ot the most artistic and luxurious homes in California, oc- 
cupying the entire top floor of the Francisca Apartments. 

MR. AND MRS. EDGAR WALTER asked their friends to a 
dinner party on Friday evening, having several score guests. 

MR. AND MRS. REMO E. SBARBARO celebrated the ninth 
anniversary of their marriage Sunday night by having some 
of their friends at a handsome supper party followed by 
games, music and dancing. The party took place at their 
home on Washington street. 

MR. AND MRS. ATHOLL McBEAN entertained at a dinner at 
their home in Washington street Monday evening. 

BRIDGE 

MRS. THOMAS HAWKINS, who is visiting here from her home 
at Hollister, was the incentive for a small bridge tea 
given on Monday afternoon by Mrs. John J. Smith. The 
affair was held at the home of the hostess in California 
street. 

DANCES 

GOLDEN JUBILEE BALL — In commemoration of the fiftieth 
anniversary of the founding of Sacred Heart College, a 
golden jubilee ball was held Monday evening in the colon- 
ial and red ballrooms of the Fairmont Hotel. It was a gala 
concourse of past and present pupils of that institution and 
in the grand march many notables in the medical, jour- 
nalistic, judicial and business circles owning S. H. C. their 
alma mater passed in review. To music furnished by a col- 
lege orchestra, "fair ladies and brave men" danced 'till 
one o'clock in the morning and uncounted reunions of old 
time but long separated friends occurred. Among the num- 
erous patronesses were noted Mesdames Charles Templeton 
Crocker. John C.alway. D. C. Jackling, ('has. H. Kendrick, 
Eleanor Martin. Rudrlph Spreckels, Jos. 0. Tobin. Andrew 
Welch and Edward J. Tobin. Brother George, F. S. C. 
is present head of the Catholic institution. 

MR. JAMES D. PHELAN will entertain at a dinner dance 
this Saturday evening in honor of Miss Claudine Spreck- 
els, debutante daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels. 
The affair will be held at the Bohemian Club and will be 
attended by a group of the young society set. 

THE BACHELORS' BALL will be .in event of Friday evening, 
February 29. A number of dinner parties are being ar- 
ranged Eoi the evening. Miss Julia Adams will entertain at 
a large dinner at the Fairmont Hotel, later going to the 
dance at Tanforan with her guests. Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Hays Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Francis Langton and Mr. 
George llolali-g will also lie dinner hosts before the dance. 
There will be a number of other dinners given. 

THE SAN FRANCISCO LAW SCHOOL — The student body of 
tin' S, F. Law School will give their annual dame at the 
Palace Hotel this evening. It will be an informal affair 
and the president of this organisation reports that there 
will be over four hundred in attendance. 
IN TOWN AMI OUT 

Mil. AND MRS. RICHARD SCHLES1NGER returned Tuesday 
on the steamer Matsonia from Honolulu, where they have 
been spending their honeymoon, and are with her parents. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Whitney, in Washington street. 

MR. AND MRS. KENNETH R, KINGSBURY returned Tuesday 
to their home in Pacific avenue from a motor trip through 
the southern part of the state. They left San Francisco 
about the middle of last week. 



.it:, and mks. JOHN WARD MAILLARD Sr. left Wondaj toi 

Redlands, where thej will visit at the Morrison residence 

for several days. The] "ill return to San Francisco towards 
the close of February. 

Mil- AMI MRS. GEORGE FORDERER left for tin' south Tues- 
day. They are making the trip by motor and will be away 
.i week or ten days. 

tlISS KATHLEEN KEATING of Cumberland, Maryland, arrived 
Wednesdaj from the Atlantic coast for a fortnight's visit 
in Sun Francisco. During her sojourn here Miss Keating 
will be the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Hobbs at 
their home in Lake street. Mrs. Hobbs was formerly Miss 
Virginia Loop, her marriage having been an event of the 
late autumn. 

MR. AND MRS. THOMAS MIDDLETON and Mr. Richard 
Schwerin, who sailed from San Francisco a short time ago 
on a pleasure trip, have arrived at Colon. They will later 
go to Florida, and may possibly visit Havana before their 
return to California. 

MISS ESPERANCE GHIRARDELLI entertained a group of the 
younger society set at a house party over the week end 
at Inverness. The party motored from San Francisco Sat- 
urday morning and returned from Inverness Sunday eve- 
ning. Mr. and Mrs. Milo Robbins chaperoned the house 
party, whose members included Miss Ghirardelli, Miss Mary 
Gorgas, Miss Edith Kynnersly, Mr. Ralph Clark, Mr. Philip 
Molton and Mr. Richard Danforth. 

INTIMATIONS 

MR. AND MRS. BERRIEN ANDERSON are being congratulated 
on the birth of a daughter, which occurred February 7. 
The baby will be called Corona, after her mother, who was 
Miss Corona Williams, daughter of Mr. Harry Williams of 
Berkeley. 

DR. CLAUDE W. COLONNA. U. S. N., whose engagement to 
Miss Louise Braden, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene 
Burford Braden, was announced in January, was recently 
called east on account of the illness and subsequent pass- 
ing of his mother at her home in Richmond, Va. On his 
return to California arrangements for the marriage of the 
young couple will be made, which will be an event of the 
early spring. Dr. Colonna is stationed at Mare Island hos- 
pital. 

MISS ELEANOR MARTIN will soon leave for Europe, to pass 
the spring and summer. She is going with Mrs. John B. 
Casserly and Miss Cecilia Casserly and will join them at 
Colorado Springs, where they have spent part of the win- 
ter. 

MRS. RUDOLPH SPRECKELS is receiving the sympathy of her 
friends during the time she is confined to her home, re- 
covering from bruises and shock from an automobile ac- 
cident. Mr. and Mrs. Spreckels were driving when their 
machine collided with a street car. 

MRS. WILLIAM SPROULE has decided to join her son-in-law 
and daughter. .Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Kelly, in Europe, and 
will leave here in April. She will join the Kellys in Cannes, 
France, where they recently arrived from Northern Africa. 
Mr. Kelly's mother. Mrs. Robert Kelly of New York, is 
also there. 

MRS. ERNEST GUNTHER has come up from the south, hav- 
ing accompanied her mother. Mrs. Henry St. Goar, who had 
been her house guest for several weeks. 

MR. AND AIRS. CHARLES STOVAL have returned to their 
apartment in Pacific avenue after a four weeks' trip South. 
They motored to Santa Barbara, Pasadena and Los An- 
geles. 

DEL MONTE— Much interest is being taken in the approach- 
ing women's golf tournament at Del Monte, which opens 
on Saturday and will attract many people from San Fran- 
cis,,,, tin' peninsula and other parts of the country. Among 
residents of the peninsula who will he at Del Monte lodge 
for the event are Mr. and Mi's. Bernard Ford, Miss Kath- 
erlne Ramsey and Mr. Charles Blythe. who will make up 
one party, and in another party will be Mr. and Mrs. Cyril 
Tobin and Dr. and Mrs. Max Rothschild. Mrs Rothschild 
will compete for the championship. Miss Eleanor Sears, 
Miss Marion Hollins and Mrs. C. Van Antwerp are attrac- 
ting much attention on the Pebble Beach links these days, 
which are devoted almost exclusively to women golfers 
practicing for the championship tournament. Mr. Richard 
Hall, the celebrated portrait painter, who is visiting in San 
Francisco, was the week-end euest of friends at Del Monte 
over last Saturday and Sunday. 
— Mr. Felton Elkins. former Del Monte polo player, w 

interested spectator at the week-end polo games between 
the Eleventh Cavalry and the Hawaiian Division team. El- 
kins is here from the east to visit his former wife, v. 
abode house is one of the show places of Monterey. 



20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16. 1924 




LEISURE'S W4ND 



OBEY NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

Tom Moore, 



The Strand 

The Strand Theater is at last to 
come into it's own ! 

For starting Saturday. February 23, 
the Strand will embark on an entirely 
new program of feature pictures. The 
first will be Cosmopolitan's drama of 
life. "The Great White Way." 

The Strand Theater has a seating 
capacity of 1800 persons, and is not- 
able as the showhouse in which Sid 
Grauman attained his start, which has 
secured for him an enviable reputa- 
tion among the theater managers of 
the west. The house is to be entirely 
renovated and there will be a new 
arrangement of high class music to 
go with the pictures. 

Following the "Great White Way" 
the Strand will show "Wild Oranges," 
part of which was filmed on the San 
Francisco waterfront but a few weeks 
ago; "Three Weeks"; "Nellie, the 
Beautiful Cloak Model"; Rupert 
Hughes "True as Steel"; and the su- 
per-production starring Marion Dav- 
ies, "Volanda." 



Alcazar 

Just about everything which goes 
to make a show a successful and en- 
joyable one is contained in "Captain 
Applejack" at the Alcazar. Wallace 
Eddinger comes up to his normal 
standard — which is always good, — 
and he is ably supported by Barbara 
Brown, who you will remember as 
one of the stars in "Abie's Irish Rose." 
Others in the cast. — and they all take 
their parts well, — include Frederick 
Truesdell, Symona Boniface and Iva 
Shepard. 

Under the management of Sam IT. 
Harris, Eddinger starred with this 
play successfully last sea>on in New 
York. "Captain Applejack" is light 
and is good clean entertainment. 



Warfield 

Taking the dual role of two sisters, 
daughters of a Russian peasant. Mae 
Murray in "Fashion Row." appear- 
ing on the Warfield screen this week, 
is fascinating; she has done the best 
work in her career, she has proven 
that she can not only represent the 
flapper type, but can do reallv emo- 
tional acting. 

Mae Murray is typically the flapper 
herself, we must remember. In this 
picture, the elder daughter. Olga, is 
dark and has ambitions, while the 



other, Zita, is a rather frail little 
blonde. 

Olga goes to Xew York, represents 
herself as a princess, and has a won- 
derful time in society. Zita starts out 
to find her sister and coming over 
the water, she meets the man Olga 
had marked for life. He thinks that 
in her. he may find an instrument of 
vengeance. 

Then the complications start — we 
wouldn't want to spoil the picture by 
telling you all — and Miss Murray has 
opportunities for, and does, some fine 
acting. 

Tlie supporting cast has been well 
picked, and it includes Earle Fox, 
Freeman Wood, Elmo Lincoln of Tar- 
zan fame, Kate Lester and others. 

"Valentines," is the name of the 
Fanchon and Marco "Idea" this week 
and it is well put over. Stella Hyman 
sings and there is a comedy. "Our 
Gang," which is just fair. ( >ther short 
films complete the bill. 



Cameo 

Anna Q. Nilsson in "Innocence" at 
the Cameo this week does some fine 
acting, wears some elaborate clothes, 
as Anna usually does, and, appearing 
as Fay Leslie, musical comedy girl 
who marries a wealth}' young society 
man and incurs his parent's wrath, 
she takes her part well. 

Always good to look at, Miss Nils- 
son is almost at her best in this film. 
She is supported by Wilfred Lucus 
and Earle Fox. 

Following the feature there was a 
most interesting news reel showing 
the late President Wilson at various 
stages of his career. The "Leather 
Pushers" are always popular and the 
one shown this week was very fair. 
Lniilie Linden, the Cameo's feminine 
orchestra leader, certainly does get 
some good music out of her little band 
of six. She gives a piano solo this 
week which is well worth hearing:. 



Orpheum 

Mclntyre and Heath in "The Geor- 
gia Minstrels" are just as funny, just 
as enjoyable as they ever have or 
hope to be — in fact they seem to im- 
prove with age. Mclntyre and Heath 
of course work well together and the 
goi id old southern comedy as only these 
two can "put over," is as fresh and 
enjoyable as when these two actors 



started away back in the years of 
quite a while ago. 

The Orpheum bill this week is real- 
lv a good one with a little more va- 
riety than last week. Karyl Norman 
in his second week really has a bet- 
ter act. more beautiful clothes, and 
new songs. Sylvia Clarke was good 
and her comedy excellent. 

The Barr twins have good voices 
and are entertaining. Their voices are 
wee. but they make a cute pair and 
they dress with taste. 

Billy McDermott, with his mono- 
logue, was a little badly placed on the 
bill, directly after Mclntyre and 
Heath, and he did good work but 
was not appreciated. 

The Luster Brothers opened the 
program with an acrobatic act, and 
they were very good and did some 
clever stunts. Others on the bill were 
Henry and Moore in "Escorts Sup- 
plied." which was almost good but 
did not quite make the grade; and 
Blanche Sherwood and her brother 
in startling feats enacted on the 
trapeze. 



Penwomen's Reception 

Invitations for a French Fete to 
l^e ^iven in honor of Mrs. Adolph 
Ik Spreckels on the afternoon of 
Feb. 19th have been issued by the 
San Francisco branch of the Ameri- 
can Penwomen's League. The affair 
will take place in the gold ballroom 
of the Fairmont Hotel, and will be 
most elaborate. Mrs. Spreckels will 
be escorted by Mayor James Rolph, 
Jr., and her court of maidens dressed 
in costumes of the period of Louis 
XVI, to the magnificent chair which 
was a recent gift to her by the Queen 
of Roumania. The young girls who 
will take part are Miss Alma Spreck- 
els, Miss Valerie Huff, Miss Virginia 
Clark, and Miss Katherine Clark. 



Curran 

Following "The Bat" now appear- 
ing at the Curran Theater, Channing 
Pollock's much discussed drama, "The 
Fool." will open at the Geary street 
playhouse Monday night. 

The plot of "The Fool" is a sen- 
sational one for the author deals with 
the evils of an industrialized country 
and modern religion. It is said that 
"The Fool" is not only an intensely 
interesting drama which is replete 
with action, but it is so true to life 
that it raises a cloud of discussion 
wherever it is shown. 



Columbia 

"The Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary." 
which has been playing to packed 
houses at the Columbia, proves the 
popularity of May Robson. Miss Rob- 
son seems to be better this year in 
this play than ever before and "The 



February 16, 1924 

Rejuvenation of Aunt Mary." which 
has a very fair plot, is well worth 
viewing — if Inn to see May Kobson. 
"The Merchant of Venice," with 
David VVarfield, starts next Monday 
evening at the Columbia and it prom- 
ises to be a masterpiece. 



Nonsense About Getting on the Stage 

The newspapers do their best to 
show that stage aspirants are marks 
[or fakirs. It is inconceivable that 
because a person wants to learn to 
act he will believe the man can teach 
him who claims so with a great deal 
of noise. It is preposterous that any- 
body who goes to the theater and 
sees what acting is, is caught by the 
fanfare of the literature that the 
quacks spread for bait. What is the 
earthly connection between the jum- 
ble of grandiose statements and play- 
ing a part in the drama? 

Theatrical managers and stage di- 
rectors should be very careful about 
recommending schools that teach his- 
trionic art. They might consider the 
harm of quackery, and not bother to 
be good fellows in sending the novice 
for a course of instruction that they 
know in their hearts is all bunk. 

Pupils should he coached by high- 
ly recommended stage craftsmen, 
whose legitimate methods are proved. 
They should not he expected to he 
put upon the stage. Their careers 
are their own lookout. Dear amateurs, 
you are foolish if you believe in the 
man who even infers he grinds out 
stars or can land jobs for a hundred 
and forty students a year, on the 
legitimate stage or the screen. If 
your instructor has influence, well 
and good, he will use it whenever 
he has the opportunity, and the less 
he crows over his acquaintance in the 
profession, usually the more he has. 
lie is most likely to aid you if you 
prove the exceptional, but he can't 
make wild promises. If he does, h-e 
is no good; it's up to you to learn. 
Bank on what you feel within your- 
self, and pay a dollar for a dollar's 
worth of honest-tO-God training. 

All this is apropos of the latest 
scandals among the dramatic schools 
in San Francisco. 



In Honolulu 

Miss Susan Fountain, who for sev- 
eral years served as dramatic critic 
tor the News Letter, is in Honolulu, 
to he gone for some time, and while 
there will write a series of articles 
lor different journals, among them 
being "American Influence I'pon the 
Hawaiian Islands." and the "Hono- 
lulu Public Schools." Miss Fountain 
began her literary career on the "Id 
New York "Sun," and was for many 
years following with the Windsor 
Publishing Company, internal 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

publishers in London, Birmingham, 
I 'dinhnrg. Berlin, I'aris and Vienna, 
at which offices she -pent much of 
her time. Prior to the war, she oc- 
cupied the post of editor of the "( !os- 
mopolitan." a magazine printed in five 
languages in the city i if I ,ondon, 



21 



PAY-AS-YOU-GO! 

"Why should the city pay $35,000,- 
000/' I the approximate price at which 
Engineer ( I'Shaughnessy has valued 
the Market Street Railway holdings) 
"when the Railways will revert au- 
tomatically to the city, at the expi- 
ration of the franchises?" So ipies- 
tions the "man in the street." 

He has not taken into considera- 
tion the fact that these franchises 
expire at widely different periods, or, 
to be exact, from 1929 to 1953! For 
instance, the duration of time between 
the expiration of the two franchises 
on the Sutter Street line, involves 
a period of nearly twenty years! And 
this is the case of other branches of 
the Market Street Railway. Even the 
intelligence of the layman should be 
capable of grasping the state of con- 
fusion incident to such a condition. 

The "man in the street" also ob- 
jects to the city being taxed to meet 
this purchase. But the initial plan 
of organizations that have the city's 
welfare at heart, has been the "Pay- 
as-you-go" plan, and this idea has 
met with the approval of the com- 
mittee appointed by Mayor Rolph to 
consider this question, which sat in 
meeting on the 8th of this month, and 
was advised that under the charter 
amendment adopted by the people two 
years ago, it will be possible to ac- 
quire the properties without the is- 
suance of bonds. 

The committee will meet with the 
Market Street Railway's officials in 
the near future to take up further 
negotiations regarding this most im- 
portant subject. 



Gktf e Mtttqtmtb 

Adjoining Columbia and Curran Theaters 
Geary and Mason. Phone Prospect 61 





^W 


y 












T 


ill 

iff*' 


Dinner 
JACK r 

BE.J 

RADIAI 
HIGH 


and Cabaret Every Ev 
I0LLAND AND HIS FA 
UTY REVUE IN LATE 
SONGS AND DANCES 
MT COLORFUL COS! 

GRADE ENTERTAINP 


ening 

MOUS 
.ST 

UMES 
dENT 



"Father," said the conventional 

small Ui\ . "u hat is the different e be 

tweeil a pedestrian and a jay-walker?" 
\ pedestrian." returned the conven- 
tional father, "is a person who walks 
when you are walking. A jay-walker is 
a person who walks when you are 
driving." — California Pelican. 



Judge — You are charged with run- 
ning down a policeman. What have 
you to say for yourself? Motorist — I 
didn't know he was an officer, your 
honor. 1 thought he was just a pedes- 
trian. — New York Sun. 



STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 

Each beginner is immediately given 
a role and productions arranged. 

STUDIO 

506 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Kearny 5454 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

Monte Rio 
Hotel 

Remodeled-Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rooms with Hot and Cold 

Water. 
50 Rooms with Private Bath. 
Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern GRILL on Main Floor. 

Now Open 

NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements. OFFICIAL 
A. A. A. HOTEL. Rates, American 
plan, $4 per day and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE H. CARR, Proprietor. 

Make Reservations in Advance 

See Peck Judah or Crabtrees 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 



MiniK OF ANM \l. MEETING 
Notice is hereby given that the annual meet- 
the Stockholders ■•!" K"sebrand Petroleum 

any, a California Corporation, will he held 
tn the Company's office in room 704, * !lunle 

Building, fcrner I California and Mmitgomery 
in the < *ity and County of San 
California, on Tuesday, Februai 
Vli><-k P M . for the purpoe 
directors for the year ensuing and for the trans- 
action of such ctther but 
come before the meeting. 

A MILLER, Secretary. 



22 



Mardi Gras 

Color and spectacular effects of San 
Francisco's famous society Mardi Gras 
affairs of previous years will be revived 
on a lavish scale at the corning Mardi 
Gras celebration of the local Knights 
of Columbus. Saturday evening, March 
1, at the Exposition Auditorium, ac- 
cording to tentative plans for the big 
event announced by the K. of C. of- 
ficials in charge of the function. 

The celebration is to be given un- 
der the joint auspices of the Golden 
Gate and Mission councils. "Caseys". 
and will be made an annual event by 
the two branches of this popular fra- 
ternal society. Proceeds from the 
March 1 celebration at the Civic Au- 
ditorium will be turned into a fund 
being established to assist in the fi- 
nancing of modern K. of C. clubhouses, 
athletic headquarters and community 
centers in the Park-Presidio and Mis- 
sion districts of San Francisco. 

General admission and reserved seat 
tickets are on sale at Sherman, Clay 
& Co.'s, Sutter and Kearny streets, and 
Kohler & Chase, 26 O'Farrell street. 

Coming — The Clavilux 

Thomas Wilfred, the inventor, will 
present his Clavilux or Color Organ 
for the first time in San Francisco on 
March 15th at the St. Francis in the 
Colonial Ballroom, afternoon and eve- 
ning, under the auspices of the Na- 
tional League for Woman's Service in 
its new role as the Women's City Club. 

The Clavilux is controlled from a 
keyboard like an organ. But its product 
is not sound but light, — "a soundless 
composition of color, form, motion." 
which is thrown on a screen. It plays 
in rhythm to the eye in these media 
as music is played to the ear. Critics 
have indicated that it presages a new 
art, "perhaps the most spiritual and 
radiant art of all." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 

given at such reduced rates for the 
children. 



Young People's Symphony 

The Young People's Symphony Con- 
certs will be continued when its sec- 
ond concert will be given on Thurs- 
day afternoon. February 28th, with 
Mr. Alfred Hertz conducting at the 
Municipal Auditorium at 3:30 p. m. 
These concerts were established some 
two years ago with the hearty co-op- 
eration of Miss Estelle Carpenter, di- 
rector of music in our Public Schools. 
The concerts were such a success that 
a second series was put on last year, 
the interest was so manifest that this 
year the work has been continued un- 
der the able management of Alice Met- 
calf. 

This movement of the Young Peo- 
ple's Symphony Concerts is <>ne that 
is spreading throughout the United 
States and it is to be hoped that the 
parents will take particular interest in 
these concerts as it is as much to the 
credit of San Francisco that they arc 



Warfield 

Aileen Stanley is coming to the '\Yar- 
field on Saturday, February 16. Called 
"the phonograph girl" because of her 
excellent work on the records of the 
leading reproducing companies. Miss 
Stanlev is. beside this, one of the im- 
portant vaudeville headliners of the 
country. On the screen there will be 
the remarkable canine actor. Strong- 
heart, in his latest Larry Trimble-Jane 
Miirfm drama, "The Live Master." 
Pictured in the far north, this photo- 
drama is credited with being one of 
the must unusual of the year. The 
story is vital in interest. There will 
be the Fanchon and Marco "Ideas," 
Lipschultz and his Warfield Music 
Masters, comedies and shorter film 
subjects of interest. 

Telegraph Hill Players 

The crista of the two plays to be 
produced by the Telegraph Hill Play- 
ers at the Plaza Theater. San Fran- 
cisco, on February 15. 16 and 17. con- 
tains many well known and attractive 
names. 

Vivii nne Chadwick. who plays the 
title role in Strindberg's "Countess 
Julia," has long been known as a prom- 
inent member of the Sausalito Play- 
ers. In Shaw's "The Showing Up of 
Blanco Posnet," the title part will be 
taken by Mr. Legere. who thus per- 
forms two entirely dissimilar and dif- 
ferent parts in one evening — a feat 
which displays his fine artistry to 
splendid advantage. Tickets are on sale 
at the Plaza Theater box office and at 
Sherman. Clay & Co., San Francisco. 



February 16. 1924 

( irinav in the afternoon and by Rudy 
Sieger in the evening. Prima Donna 
Mariska T. Konder, Hungarian Radio 
Singer from New York and Budapest, 
will sing a few old Hungarian songs 
in costume. Mrs. Hegyi-Greenough 
will play the Hungarian Zimbal. Miss 
Virginia Miller, one of Madame Erke- 
ly's artist students, a young girl of 
14 years, will be the soloist, playing 
the Hungarian Fantasy by Liszt with 
the orchestra, under the conductor, 
Gvula Ormav. 



Farmer — I'll give you $5 a day to 
help me dig potatoes. You can start 
now. Boy — Guess you better do it 
alone, mister. You planted them, so 
you know where thev are. 



Symphony 

Jean Gerardy, the famous Belgian 
'cellist, will be the guest soloist at the 
fifth and last popular concert of the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. 
Alfred Hertz Conductor, at the Expo- 
sition Auditorium. Tuesday evening, 
March 11, at 8:20 o'clock. For many 
years Gerardy came to America and 
created a profound sensation at his 
recitals in the principal cities, and 
when he made his last tour prior to his 
enlistment in the Belgian army, he was 
generally recognized as having reached 
the pinnacle of perfection. But the 
Gerardy of today is said to even sur- 
pass the Gerardy of eight years ago. 
He has hundreds of admirers in San 
Francisco who look forward eagerly 
to his appearance. 



Hungarian Concert-Ball 

Hungarian Children's Relief Asso- 
ciation will give a Musical Tea and 
Grand Ball at the Fairmont Hotel on 
February 20, a charity affair and a so- 
cial and musical event. The musical 
program will be conducted by Gyula 




SanTjrancisco 

Marck 1st 

If you plan to enjoy the Mardi Gras 
festivities, -write now for reserva- 
tions. Your comfort is assured at 

i-i o -r e L_ 

PLATA 

POST STREET AT STOCKTON 




FIREPROOF STORAGE 

PACKING MOVING 

SHIPPING 



WILSON BROS. CO., Inc. 

1626-1623 Market Street 

Between Franklin and Cough 
Telephone Park 271 



February 16. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



23 




By KEM 

"We note this distinction today between the novel 
and the romance. The novel seeks to depict life as it 



realh 



■ " — Jesse Lee Bennett. 



THE Swinnerton novels come to mind in this connec- 
tion, as Mr. Swinnerton has just been in our midst, 
and there is such a call for his very realistic novels NOC- 
TURNE, SHOPS AND HOUSES and also for his very 
last ^ OUXG FELIX. His admirers were happy to wel- 
come him Friday afternoon, in person, at the Paid Elder 
Gallery. 

"No wonder he can write such colorful stories; he has 
red hair," explained a lady who watched his going up the 
"Marigold Stairs" to greet his callers. 

"Really he seems quite human, it's a pleasure to meet 
him." said the Fiction lady on the lower floor, who had evi- 
dently had much experience in meeting authors. 

Surrounded by groups of admiring ladies, Mr. Swinner- 
ton met the callers who wanted to "shake hands with him 
and obtain in person his autograph. This he inscribed on 
his various books in tiny, meticulous handwriting that 
interested because it was so characteristic. Many San Fran- 
cisco writers were present, and as all authors "are now re- 
garded as royalty. — they held court about him. 

The reception committee of prominent literary people 
who were invited to receive with him, were Mrs. Gertrude 
Atherton, Mrs. W. B. Bonnie, Mr. Maurice Brown, Mr. 
Charles Caldwell Dobie, Mr. George Douglas, Mr. Charles 
K. Field. Prof. E. O. James, Mr. Charles Keeler, Mr. Peter 
Clark MacFarlane. Mrs. Nancy Barr Mavitv, Miss Ruth 
Comfort Mitchell, Mr. Frederick O'Brien. Mr! George Ster- 
ling and Mr. Stewart Edward White. Mrs. Atherton was 
not able to be present, being still in Xew York. 

At 4:30 Mr. Swinnerton departed for a "cup of tea" — 
an Englishman's necessity, and not "A DINNER OF 
HERBS" he wanted it distinctly understood, since his 
charming hostess was Mrs. Nancy Barr Mavitv. 

The lecture in the evening at tiie Plaza was not a "Lec- 
ture" but a very enjoyable "talk" with .Mr. Swinnerton in 
which he told his audience about the strenuous life Mr. 
Wells' guests led from trying to get a bath to "playing 
eye-glass breaking games of tennis, polo or pillow fights 
with each other;" the number of waiters it took to look 
out for Chesterton while he sat and drank and wrote an 
article in a restaurant; about Compton Mackenzie ami his 
Channel Island home — in fact all the little personal items 
oi interest of gossip about well-known English authors 
From Galsworthy, staring through large round glasses to 
(Catherine Mansfield, about whom he wasn't sure whether 
"she wore her hair bobbed or just messed up in the back." 

Mr. Sw iniicrton's next visit will he looked forward to 
with much interest, as we now feci we really know and 
like him. 

* * * 

WHAT BOOKS CAN DO FOR YOU by Jesse Lee 
Bennett is given to the public with the explanation that 
it is a "Sketch Map of the Frontiers of Knowledge with 
lists ot Selected Books," and that "its primary purp 
to serve as a guide to hooks which can give such realistic 
understanding of the essentials of knowledge a-- will per- 
mit the individual to adapt himself more happily and sat- 
isfactory to life, because he will have gained new under- 
standing of life and of himself." 

The busy people, the ones seeking sclf-educalioii. the lil- 



erary gleaners, will find this library-sized volume of great 
practical use and also of enjoyment, for it is written in 
modern, readable style. The fifteen lists of hooks repre- 
senting the principal fields of knowledge make it of value 
as a book ot reference, as well, for poets, artist-., connois- 
seurs and parents seeking hooks for children. 

Doran, $2.50. 



FAMOUS AUTHOR SERIES 
Thirty-six of the best selling books during the last few 

lens, have been issued in paper covers, by the Garden 
i il\ Publishing Co., Inc., which can be bought for fifteen 
cents each at any of the better class shops or news stands. 

I hese come under the head of the "Famous Authors Ser- 
ies," and we quote twelve of the most popular: 

"The Touchstone" By Edith Wharton 

"North of Fifty Three" ". . . By Rex Beach 

"The Gorgeous Isle" By ( iertrude Atherton 

"Wings" By Gene Stratton Porter 

"The Beautiful Lady" By Booth Tarkington 

"Ma Pettingill Talks" By Harry Leon Wilson 

"The Spanish Jade" By Maurice Hewlett 

"Captain Wardlaw's Kitbags" By Harold McGrath 

"The Dark Fleece" By Joseph I lergesheimer 

"An Amateur" ...By W. B. Maxwell 

"The Duel" By Joseph Conrad 

"Uneducating Mary" By Kathleen Norris 



tgBHBHHHBBBHHBHBHBSSBSHBBBSBHHHHBBBBBBBHBBHBHEJB 
Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained j§ 

at PAUL ELDER'S 

AM) PAUL ELDER'S LIBRARY S3 

239 Post Street San Francisco | 

BBBBBBaBSBSSBBBSBBBBHHBBBBBBBBSBBHBBEBBBSHBBHgl 




MARY HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



Luncheon is served from 11:30 to 2:30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 

334 SUITER STREET Douglas 71 18 



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Manufacturers of 
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BatB Kninii-.ri. 



24 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 1924 






FINA NOAU 



By P. N. BERINGER 

IT is not to be doubted that the banks and their condi- 
tion is a reflection of the conditions prevailing in the 
city itself. The condition of the banks show a great pros- 
perity, and if the banks are expanding their business by 
every legitimate means at their disposal, which is the case 
today in San Francisco, then it may safely be determined 
that business, as a general rule, is very prosperous in the 
metropolis of the Pacific Coast. 

Other Cities 

While the above is true of San Francisco it may be said 
to lie equally true of every city in the state. Now. then, 
if the banks all over the state report the same activity 
which is shown in San Francisco it may be taken for 
assured that we are face to face as a community and a 
state with a year of unexampled prosperity. There is every 
reason to believe the rains the farmers are so dependent 
upon for good crops will not fail to come and already the 
downpours we have had have brought us very nearly to 
the normal fall of moisture. So the farmers and the mer- 
chants doing well, the banks being active, we should this 
year see the real prosperity for which we have been wait- 
ing ever since the armistice was signed. 



a home. That is why California today is attracting so much 
attention in the whole country. All over the state atten- 
tion is now being given to the planning of new and better 
highways and every means possible is being thought of to 
speed industry and" commerce along the lines of least re- 
sistance. 



Transportation 

It is almost a common saying that transportation and in- 
dustries are linked and that which benefits the one must, of 
necessity, mean the amelioration of the condition of the 
other. Of course, commerce is linked with industries and 
both of these factors depend to an enormous extent on 
transportation to ensure their prosperity. Transportation 
is the annihilation of distance and with such annihilation. 
by every means in our power, we should all of us pledge 
ourselves to use our utmost efforts. Transportation has 
come to mean much more than the carriage of people or 
frieight by train. The automobile and the truck is now a 
very large factor in the further development of transpor- 
tation facilities. Wagon, truck, railroad and perhaps water 
transportation are elements in the preservation and the 
increase in commerce and industries. 



Good Roads 

Good roads should be considered as foremost in this 
great development which is constantly going on and the 
state and community giving attention to the expansion 
of its good roads system and to the improvement of the 
streets of towns and villages is the state and the commun- 
ity in which industry and commerce will most easily find 



Income Taxes 

There is little time left in which to make out your re- 
turn as to your income. March 15th is your last day for 
filing. Better be about it. now. Remember that you may 
deduct for contributions to corporations, organizations, or- 
ganized and exclusively operated for religious, scientific, 
literary or educational purposes, no part of the net earnings 
of which inure to the benefit of any private stockholder or 
individual. These are deductible to the extent of fifteen 
per cent of the taxpayer's net income for 1923. computed 
without the benefit of this deduction. Every church is con- 
sidered a corporation for the purpose of this deduction. 
Donations to missionary funds, church buildings, pew rents, 
assessments and dues, paid to churches are deductible. 



Most Useful Information 

The Anglo London Paris Company has had compiled and 
is issuing to the public and its patrons a very compact and 
well printed pamphlet, which is entitled "Federal Taxes." 
Valuable information is found in forty-five pages of the 
booklet and there is no question, likely to arise, in making 
out an income tax return, be it for an individual, a cor- 
poration, a partnership, an estate or for any kind of per- 
sonality or activity having to make a return that is not 
set forth in a clear and lucid manner, and under the proper 
heads. Your income tax return must be made by the fif- 
teenth day of March and everyone wishing to make an in- 
telligent and fair statement to himself and to the govern- 
ment would do well to procure one of these booklets from 
the Anglo London Paris Company, either here or at < Ink- 
land, or Los Angeles, or the same house at Xew York. The 
address here is on Sansome street. 



Retail trade in San Francisco has improved to such an 
extent that the usual falling away after the Holidays was 
not felt at all this year. Xever before in the history of 
San Francisco and Oakland has there been such a volume 
of business done as since the Christmas trade was over and 
the new year begun. The dry goods stores and other stores 
in both cities which cater to the householders' wants are 
doing a thriving business and the best part of the report is 
that this business seems to be increasing. 



Those in business may depend on a larger tide of travel 
coming this way during the summer than has ever before 
found its way to San Francisco. Many of these travellers 
are coming to stay and l l| 24 is going to be an exceptional 
year for the settlement of the stranger in our city and the 
state. This is the direct result of advertising. The stop- 
over privilege is something that will be a distinct benefit 
to the merchandiser. 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Juat Out 

370 Busli Street 

Phone Kearny 1725 San Francisco. Cal. 




Are You 
Particular? 



^-5^/ We Offer 

Dining Car Service and Observation 
Cars With Speed and Comfort for your 
trip to Sacramento and the Sacramento 
Valley. 

For further information call 

San Francisco — Telephone Garfield 64 

Oakland — Telephone Piedmont 345 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R. 

The Scenic Route 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1340-51 Mission St., bet. 9th and lOlh 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 
Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 



Automobile 



and Household Goods a 
Specialty 






February 16. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



25 



i»aa« 



it it it :; it « it k it it it it it it :i it : : it tilt it iihbho :: :t :; :: :: :: :: 



INS I 



LA 



: x a K it h it it it ; 






l)ii you know that the fire loss in the United States is 
$1000 a minute? This is no exaggeration but is taken from 
the statement made by Arnold Hodkinson, of the San Fran- 
Cisco Board of Fire Underwriters, of which he is the Presi- 
dent. Doesn't that loss astound you? Of course, fire in- 
surance men are interested in cutting down that loss and 
feveryone in the community should be of the same mind. 
If the tremendous losses, through tires, could be cut down, 
if all avoidable fires could be avoided, then insurance rates 
would almost immediately respond by coming- down from 

their high perches in various districts of the country. 

* # * 

just think of that, eighty per cent of these fires are, in 
the opinions of experts, avoidable. 

* * * 

The Virginia and the Montana courts have held that it 
IS not theft to "borrow" a car, without the knowledge of 
the owner, keep it over night, damage it considerably, and 
then take it back and leave it about a block from the garage. 
In California we call a spade a spade and a theft is a theft. 
Just you try taking a car and you will find out there is 
no doubt whatever that you are a thief in the eves of the 
law. 

i£ Sfi S£ 

It is interesting to note the two sons of |. B. Levison, 
of the Fireman's Fund, are in business together as insur- 
ance brokers, with offices in the Alaska Commercial build- 
ing. The gentlemen are well known and both have had 
experience. John (j. Levison and Robert M. Levison are 
sure to do well in the business. 

The Publicity Bureau by its very capable work is strip- 
ping the insurance business of its mystery and this is surely 
a very good thing for the Bureau to be engaged in bring- 
ing about. Mr. Hodkinson is a strong factor in the Bureau. 

* *■ * 

Edward Brown and Son are now the general agents for 
the Metropolitan Casualty Company. O. M. Doyle and 
Philip M. Crosby are the assistant managers. 

* * * 

Richard Waldon Jr. of the Hoard of Fire Underwriters 
of the Pacific made a host of friends here on his recent 
\isil. lie is the secretary of the Underwriters' organization. 

\Y. I!. Westlake is now special agent for Edward Brown 

and Son. 

* * * 

II. X. Dickson, the vice president of the Glen Falls and 
the Commerce, likes San Francisco so much his friends pre- 
dict that he will eventually come here to live. He will be 
here about a week longer. 

* * * 

The headquarters of the new automobile service club 

of insurance men is located at 374 Pine street. 

* * * 

The Certified Elevator Inspectors of California will have 
their animal convention at the Hotel Whitcomb February 

20 and 21. Insurance people are greatly interested in the 

topics it has been arranged to he discussed. 

' * * * 

John II. Shiveley, of the Insurance Federation, addn 

the Kotaiw Club at Santa Ana on Lincoln's Birthday. 

* * * 

The Annual Convention of the Certified Hoiler Ins 
tors will l>e held at the Hotel Whitcomb on February IS 
and I". 



DOHENY AND OTHERS 

President Coolidge has hit the right note when he says 
that he will not sacrifice an honest man for his I the Presi- 
dent's) welfare neither will he sacrifice a dishonest man 
I'll, ire that man has had a trial and for these and other 
reasons he refuses to take any action toward the recog- 
nition of the request sent him from the Senate that Denby 
he thrust out of office. The same rule should apply in the 
minds of all good citizens as regards not only Doheny 
but McAdoO and others who have in any way been con- 
nected with the Teapot Dome scandals. 

It will not do to accuse any man and expect the Presi- 
dent or the public to take it for granted this accusation 
is founded on fact. There must always be a searching in- 
vestigation as to any charges made as to trusted officials 
in high or in low places. 

\\ e cannot allow' the necessities of political managers, 
on one side or the other, to sway us through a great out- 
cry made as to the dealings which accompanied the grant- 
ing of the oil leases. Let us keep cool and keep our pow- 
der dry and let us see to it that no guilty man escapes 
but let us also avoid making a political issue where there 
is no necessity that any should exist. 



THE ACCIDENT 

How strange it is — you lie there motionless. 

And only yesterday I heard your voice and touched your 

hand 
Which clasped mine in return. 
How strange it is that some weak, sickly flame will burn 

and burn 
And a strong, steady light, much needed in the world will 

be snuffed out. 
\\ hat Deity can make excuse for this? 

— Elsa Nye Meriwether. 



— The contemplated improvement by the San Francisco 
Y. M. C. A., which were discussed last week, include a 
new home for the Chinese branch and extensive additions 
to the Presidio branch, which will provide added facilities 
for men on the military reservation. These additions, to 
cost $50,000, will include the installation of a large swim- 
ming pool as well as reading rooms and other accommo- 
dations. 



Urozit 

Pulverized Sheep Manure 

In Bags or in Bulk 

Five times a- efficient as ordinary manui 

less, does not draw flies, easy to handle, free from 
seeds and foreign matter — packed in 100-pound 
bag-. For your lawns, gardens, window boxes. 
potted plants, golf green, orchards, vineyards. It is 
good lor anything that grows. Will deliver any 
quantity from a sack to a carload. Call or write. 

PACIFIC MANURE FERTILIZER CO. 

Main Office, 429 DAVIS ST., SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone Kearny 1542 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 16, 1924 



"U. C. Girl 
Players" 

is the title of the attrac- 
tive trcrat page of next 
Sunday's Rotagravure 
Section, and shows some 
U. C. girls in attractive 
poses. "Twins of the 
Bay District," another 
interesting page, por- 
trays just what the title 
indicates. Another in- 
teresting feature is 

''Airplaning 
Over Redwood" 

A series of aero photos 
taken by a Chronicle 
staff photographer. 
There is a very timely 
page of "Britain's Labor 
Cabine t," another of 
"American Notes," and 
an attractive grouping 
of some European 
charmers, participants 
in a recent beauty con- 
test. All the worth- 
while news of the world 
is picturized in The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



"And did you really camp out along 
the road?" "Yes, my dear. Every day 
for lunch." 



ABUNDANT 
WATER FOR 
EVERY NEED 



Are you risking your crops, may- ■ 
be your entire fortune, on the un- 
certainties of a surface water sup- 
ply? 




Don't (In it ! With a sturdy, depend- 
able PRICE pump the pure waters 
under the earth are yours in abun- 
dance, day and night, winter and 
summer. 

Keep your crops nourished, strength- 
ened and revitalized through efficient 
irrigation. PRICE pumps on your 
farm will pay for themselves many 
times over in increased crops, Send 
for catalog. 

G. W. PRICE 
PUMP & ENGINE CO. 

Manufacturers 

Members Western Irrigation Equip- 
ment. Assn. 

1350 Folsom si. 
SAN FRANCISCO 




Lawver Snatch M. Snatchem — We 
have fought a good fight. You have 
won your suit and 1 congratulate you. 
After deducting my fees and er — cer- 
tain other sundry charges I find you 
have left $1. Successful Litigant — 
What's the matter with it, is it bad? 



Grace — Oh, Mr. Nocoyne! How 
lovely of \ ou to bring me these beauti- 
ful flowers! How sweet they are. and 
how fresh! I do believe there is a little 
dew on them yet! Nocoyne — Well, yes, 
there is; but I'll pay it tomorrow. 



Wife (to husband who has taken the 
precaution of booking their tickets be- 
forehand) — There's one good thing. 
'Enery, we 'aven'l got our tickets to 
worry about. Henry — No, Liz, we 
haven't! I've been an' gone an' left 
them under the clock on the sittin'- 
room mantelpiece! — Humorist (Lon- 
don). 



'Yat does 'honesty' 



asked 



Ikey. "Veil," replied Mr. Isaacs, "it is 
difficult to explain. But if 1 cashed a 
check for $50 for the business, and I 
got $60 in mistake, and 1 gave m\ 
partner $5. that would be honesty." 



"Say, Joe. you're a broker; can't you 
give me a tip?" "1 know something 
that is now about twenty, and within 
six months 1 can guarantee it to be 
over ninety." "Sounds fine! What is 
it . J " "The thermometer." — Mass. Tech. 

\ oo Dl II I. 



"I hear that Hank had an accident." 
'Acs, some one gave him a tiger cub 
and told him it would eat off his hand." 
"Well?" "It did."— California Wam- 
pus. 



Professor (explaining magnetism) — 
Jack, how many natural magnets are 
known of? Jack- -Two. sir. Professor 
— \ es ! And will you please name 
them? Jack — Blondes and brunettes, 
sir. — Penn State Froth. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 391 San Francisco 



World Cruise 

Six Months Vacation 

Cheaper than staying at home 

The big trans-oceanic yacht 'INTKEI'ID" 
now being refitted into a palatial and lux- 
urious vaehl is expected (.. sail from San 
Francisco on or about March 31st, on the 
first six months lap of the most interest- 
ing sea cruise ever outlined. 
This cruise is strictly tor pleasure and 

the yacht Will carry none but the people 
comprising the company. 

\ complete motion picture organization 
will accompany the yacht, making sea and 
travelogue pictures in which the members 
car take part and Reap the Profits that are 
assured from the sales of these pictures. 

Every comfort and convenience will be 
provided and stops of sufficient Length will 
be made for sight seeing in all of the 
principal and interesting spots on the 

globe. 

The cost is cheaper than living at home 
would be, besides giving you an education 
unobtainable at many times the cost of 
the trip. 

For further particulars write or call at 
Office IMS Liberty Bank Building. 

The Intrepid Company 

of California 



NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of James Wheeler Riley, deceased, No. 
38120 Dept. No. 10. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W". J, Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased, to the creditors 
of and all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within four (4) months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
of the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in and for tin- City and County of San Fran- 
ciSi o, or to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the first 
publication of this notice to the said adminis- 
trator, at his office. 858 Phelan Building, San 
Francisco. California, which said last-named of- 
fice tli«- undersigned selects as his place of busi- 
ness in all matters connected with said estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES. 
Administrator of the estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, California, January 22nd, 

1924. 
n'l.i.ixAX & HICKEY, 

Attorneys for Administrator. 5t 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Estate of August Bod, deceased. No. 381 1 G. 
Dept No. 10. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned. 
W .1. Hynes, administrator of the estate of 
Augusl Bod, deceased, to the creditors of and 
all persons having claims against the said 
decedent, to file them with the necessary vouch- 
ers Within four (4) months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
of lb-' Superior Court of the State of California. 
in and for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, or to exhibit them with the necessary 
t'ouchers within four (4) months after the first 
publication of this notice to the said adminis- 
trator, at his office. 858 Phelan Building. San 
Francisco, California, which said last-named of- 
fice the undersigned selects as his place of busi- 
ness in all matters connected with said estate of 
August Bod, deceased. 

W. J. HYXFS. 
Administrator of the estate of 
August Bod. deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, California, January 22nd. 

L924. 
CULLINAN & HICKEY, 

Attorneys for Administrator. 5t 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
The MINERAL DEVELOPMENT company. 
location of principal place of business, San Fran- 
cisco, i 'alifornia. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular meet- 
ing of the Directors held on the 5th day of 
February, L924, an assessment of one cent per 

share was levied upon 1 he issued capita] stock 

of tin rporation, payable immediately in legal 

money of the United states, to the Secretary, 

at the office of the company, room I'M? Monad- 

noek Building, San Francisco, California, 

Any stock on which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on the Hth day of March, 1924. 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at 
public auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore Will be sr.ld on Thursday the lnth day of 

April, 1924, to pay the delinquent assessment. 
together with costs of advertising and expense 
of sale, 

M. J. SBELY, Secretary. 

237 Monad nock Building. San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to II p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



C. LALANNE 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL 

S New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

OLD POODLE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A $1.35 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m. 

to 9 p. m. 

Also A La Carte 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Post Street, Near Market Street 

Phone Kearny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 

$1.25 

Meals Served a la Carte. Alio Regular 

French and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 
Luncheon (11:80 to 2 p. m.).. 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .,$1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Fftllarged and Improved 

"Half Dollar" Specials 
tor the Busy Man 
151 Powell Street 



Golden Gate Restaurant 

2721 Hyde St. Phone Franklin 0500 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Afternoon Parties a Specialty 
Dance Italian Dinner 




CYCOL 

MOTOR OIL 



me ^ 

MOTOROIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

SULPHO 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
the new HEX EON 
*" process. 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint job guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil. or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush. Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

Califomia Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect 3418 -Phones- Prospect 3410 

WHAT BEST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
BEST SERVES US 



1140 Geary Street 



Tel. Franklin SflSS 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Blacksmltlilng 

II. W. Culver M. Daherer E. Johnson 



IMione Garfield 3026 Palmer Graduate 

[ [ours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Western States Life Building 
!l!..-. Market Street San Francisco 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. 18th and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San Francis... 



('HAS. .1. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE VOIR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, 86c per day; 7.60 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 3 I :'. 

siv Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 




N. w CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. C0SGR0VE 



Be photographed this year on your 
Birthday 

Studios in nil Principal Cities of California 



Oakland 
408 14th St. 



i Francisco 
Grant Ave. 



Quality 1866-56 Years-1922 Quantity 

Our Service Includes Following' Places: 

Durltngame Redwood City MenJo Park 

San Mateo Woodslde 

LaGrande & White's 
Laundry Co. 

Office and Works: 250 Twelfth Street 

Between Howard and Folsom Streets 

San Francisco Phone Market S16 

San Mateo Phone San Mateo 1488 

F.rnnoray Durability 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

SnltM Pre«»ed by Hand. Only — 
Suit* Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 
4S3 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 



■a 



INSIST ON 

ALEMITE lubricant 



PURE SOLIDIFIED OIL 




At All Healers and Service Stations 



Comfort in Travel! 

Bakersfield 
Sleeper 

on the 

OWL 

Leave 
San Francisco 6 p.m. 

(Ferry) 

Dinner in the Dining Car — 
Sleep late in the morning — 
All day for business engagements — 
Returning 
Sleeper ready for occupancy S p. in. — 
Breakfast in Diner — 
To the office direct from station — 

Other trains at convenient hours 
Xo Time Lost 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 

63 Geary St. Ferry Station Third St. Station 

Phone Sutter 4000 




oAll the latest in £Motor Cars, 
oAccessories, California Tops, etc. 

EIGHTH ANNUAL 

Pacific 
Auto Show 



EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM, SAN FRANCISCO 

FEBRUARY 16 to 23, Inc. 




Demi-TdWQ 

dhcloSQS the deliciowness 




GEO. W. CASWELL 

Sutter 6654 or Oakland 1017 

Telephone Direct 

1,800,000 cups were nerved at the Pan- 

ama-Paclfle International Exposition. 




PRICE 10 CENTS - $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SATURDAY, FE 



BRUARY 23. 19 



24 




New Stair Highway Baa Francisco to Santa Crm: 1 — Stair Highway, Barlingame. 3 — Bay Shore Highway N'ear 

South San Francisco. 3 — N'ear Summit Drive. Los Gatos. 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 



For particulars address 

SISTER SUPSRIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teetli 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any incipient disease of the 
;.-ums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute sta^e. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for our 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk it over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. Yon will 
like oor nerve blocking system; it takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST" 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Plione Garfield 836 
SPECIALISTS — Extraction*; Crowns: 
Self Clennsine Bridge* ; Porcelain Work 
and Roofless Plates. 



DR. REDMOND PAYNE 

Practice limited to 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Hours 10 to 5 — By Appointment — 

Saturday 10 to 1 Phone Sutter 4562 

Removed to Suite 537 IJebes Bide. 

177 TOST STREET 

San Francisco 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

INCORPORATED FEBRUARY 10th, 1868. 

One of the Oldest Banks in California, 

the Assets of which have never been increased 

by mergers or consolidations with other Banks. 

Member Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 31st, 1923 

Assets $89,174,468.57 

Capital, Reserve and Contingent Funds 3,850,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 430,275.37 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH. West Portal Ave. and UUoa St. 

Interest paid on Deposits at the rate of 

FOUR AND ONE QUARTER (4J4) per cent per annum, 

COMPUTED MONTHLY and COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY, 

AND MAY BE WITHDRAWN QUARTERLY 



Compensation 

General 
Liability 

Plate Glass 

Accident and 
Health 




SLt\KQBltG) 

Branch Office Pacific Coast Department 



Fidelity and 

Surety 

Burglary 

Automobile 

Insurance 



WALTER W. DERR 

105 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Manager 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIF 



The Canadian Bank of Commerce 

HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, CANADA 

Paid Up Capital 115,000,000 S15.000.000 Reserve Food 

All Kinds of COMMERCIAL BANKING Transacted 
STERLING EXCHANGE Bought, FOREIGN and DOMESTIC CREDITS Issued 

CANADIAN COLLECTIONS effected promptly and at REASONABLE RATES 

485 BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA, and at LONDON, ENG.: NEW YORK; 

PORTLAND, ORE.; SEATTLE, WASH.; MEXICO CITY, MEXICO 



San Francisco Office: 
BRUCE HEATHCOTE, Manager 



450 CALIFORNIA STREET 

W. J. COULTHARD, Assistant Manager 



Investment Service Awaits Your Call 

Our list contains the choice ot Eastern and Western bond offerings, state, 
municipal, school, irrigation and industrial securities. 

We will be pleased to counsel you in the issuance, purchase, and handling of 
investment securities. 

Let us solve your investment problems. 



ANGLO LONDON PARIS COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO 

One Sansome 

Street 



OAKLAND 

709 Syndicate 

Building 



LOS ANGELES 

S17-18 California 

Bank Building 



NEW YORK 

Two Wall 

street 



The Name PIONEER 




on a box of office 
stationery, wheth- 
er it be typewrit- 
er paper or man- 
uscript cover 
means complete 
satisfaction. 
There is a grade 
for every need. 
Ask your printer 

o r stationer t o __ ___ 

show you samples. ^ ^ j irl : u FFWJA±j±j ( 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

Established 1856 
41 First Street - - San Francisco 



OUR service in all phases of Auto 
Livery is backed by an adequate 
organization and over forty 
years of successful experience in busi- 
ness. 




Established 1808 
1 023-1 <i31 PIXE STREET 




EiUMUhtd July «0. IftM 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. CIV 



SAX FRANCISCO, CALIF, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1924 



No. 8 



THK SAX FRAXCISCO X'FWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott. Ross Building, 235 Montgomery Street. San Francisco, 
Calif. Telephone Douglas GS53. Entered at San Francisco, Calif.. Tost 
Office as second-class matter. 

London Office: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhlll, E. C. England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year 55.00. Foreign, one 
year, $6.00 : Canada, one year, $6.00. 



— The troubled political waters at the Capitol cannot be 
tranquilized by oil. 



— Even Leap Year 
jump to conclusions. 



will not make President CoOlidge 



— The greatest problem connected with the rising gene- 
ration is to get it to rise in the morning. 

* * * 

— "Flora McFlimsey" cannot now use as an excuse for 
not attending a ball, the old phrase: "I have nothing to 
wear." 

* * * 

— Secretary Hughes says the United States will not med- 
dle with our southern neighbors so long as they behave 
the way we think they should. 

— The followers of the late Lenine are considering plac- 
ing him among the throng of saints; the pity of it is, that 
the mouths of the thousands who starved to death on his 
account are "stopt with dust." 

* * * 

— While rummaging through some books in the National 
Library in Paris, the curator discovered the heart of Vol- 
taire in a casket, which had been in the library since 1864. 
Mightv careless of the old French author to leave his 
heart lying around like that! 

* * * 

— An aged "super" in a moving picture company filming 
"Quo Vadis" was torn and mauled to death the other day. 
while the entire company witnessed it. and then fled in 
terror. We will remember that, when we are again watch- 
ing the faked feats of impossible heroism put on by movie 

stars. 

* * * 

— Six of the greatest English novels have been agreed 
upon by Ellen Glasgow, the American novelist, and Arnold 
Bennett. They are: "Tom Jones 
Copperfield," "Jude, the Obscure, 
Meredith, and "< >ld Wives' Tales, 
( Glasgow's chi lice. ; 

— In spite of the deficit in the state's rainfall, it seems 
to our prejudiced eyes thai never were the daffodils and 
narcissus so beautiful as now. on the flower stands. And 
mauv of the vendors are already showing big brandies oi 
fruit" blossoms, while the California Almond Growers' Ex- 
change informs us that the coming season promises to be 
the best ever enjoyed bj the growers! 



"Vanitj Fair," "I >avid 
'The Egotist," by Geo, 

i The last one was Miss 



— It is a curious fact that all the speakers on George 
Washington have Irish names. How does that come about?' 
And why should the local Irish send to the British Pre- 
mier to release De Valera. The British government gladly 
washed its hands of De Valera long ago. 

* * * 

— Andy Gallagher has more than his share of avoirdu- 
pois, and the other day he had cause to be worried about 
it, when he found himself between two cars on Market 
Street. "For G d's sake, stop !" he yelled to the Muni- 
cipal brakeman ; "I'm too fat to fit in here!" "Aha! Andy!" 
quoth his companion; "You WOULD vote for the four- 
tracks on Market Street!" 

* # # 

■ — One of the greatest journalistic jokes on Hearst has 
been the publication of the articles by Wells. These are 
almost ferociously directed against the particularistic doc- 
trines of Hearst, — notably, the last article on Belloc, — 
which is a tough nut for Hearst readers. We don't say that 
we agree with Wells, but it is the deuce and all for Hearst. 
And think what he must be paying for the articles! 

* * * 

— It is good to see that they are starting a branch of 
the Dickens Fellowship. He is coming into his own again. 
As a matter of fact, he never lost his hold, and the sale 
of his works increases regularly. Many of the branches 
carry on. as a special mark of respect for Dickens, the re- 
lief and maintenance of crippled children. It is a fine so- 
ciety and should be encouraged. 

— And speaking of street cars, something should be done 
in regard to the reprehensible habit that the Municipal 
and United cars have of racing each other. When a pas- 
senger desires to catch a United car. the Municipal blocks 
his way, and often it is as much as one's life is worth to 
gain a foothold on the cars on the inner track. It would 
be a good idea to fix a time schedule on the two systems, 
so that each car could be kept just so far from the other, 
and have this distance strictly adhered D>, all along the 
line. The recent automobile accident wherein Dr. Mayerle's 
car was ran into by a municipal car. was brought about 
by this dangerous manner of speeding car-. 

* * * 

— "Were it not for the shadow of war and the need of 

soldiers. France might well be congratulated upon her slow- 
increase in population. A low birthrate should mean less 
un-emplovment. less ignorance, less crime, a higher aver- 
age of intellectuality, greater appreciation of the spiritual 
side of life, more valuable contributions to science, art. 
literature and music, and a higher average of happiness." 
So philosophizes an editorial writer; but how about the 
Tahitan race, the inhabitants of Easter Island, the "Rise 
and Fall of the Roman Empire," and lastly, the Japanese 
Nation? In the latter country, proliferation surely does not 
express degeneracy. While, as in the former cases, a grad- 
ual fall in population quite often means decadency. In this 
atre of transition, sweeping statements and theories often 
rest on an tins. Mind base. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 23, 1924 




It is queer that the immigration ques- 
The Immigration tion should always be provocative of 
Question demagogery of the worst sort. Perhaps 

it arises from the fact that it is always 
very easv to raise a rumpus about a foreigner. The develop- 
ment of the race by the growth of mutually differing peo- 
ples has produced a fear of the foreigner which lies back 
of the unreasonable and hysterical treatment of the sub- 
ject. 

At any rate the politicians are able to take advantage 
of this fear and to play upon it to their own particular 
advantage. It is no trick to become popular by abusing a 
foreigner. Indeed the whole vocabulary has been enriched 
by the addition of flagrantly abusive words and epithets 
applied to people whose only fault is that they are a lit- 
tle different from ourselves in language or appearance. 

Representative Albert Jones works himself up into the 
following tirade, "America must be kept American. Per- 
fection of restriction immigration laws must be accom- 
plished now. Each year of delay makes action more diffi- 
cult." As if, as a matter of fact, America had not been 
kept American by the immigration of people who, coming 
here and finding themselves prosperous, have become the 
most attached and devoted of our people. The mass of 
immigrants of the first generation and their children would 
gladly die for the country which means to them oppor- 
tunity and comfort. 

Not that we are in favor of overwhelming the country 
with a mass of labor material which is hard to digest ; 
but on the other hand we are not in favor of having the 
industries and the destinies of the country held in the hands 
of a group, which, by organizing into labor unions, has an 
unrelenting grip upon our commerce and industry. 



Early in the game of this oil business we 
Easy Does It called attention to the matter and spoke 
of the necessity of not getting worked up 
about it. We said that there was nothing at all proved, 
as yet, and that the facts as they stand, did not warrant 
the conclusion that there had been anything reallv in- 
trinsically wrong about the transaction between Doheny 
and Senator Fall. So far, as yet, we have seen no reason 
to modify our first attitude. 

There has been a great deal of talk and the papers have 
blossomed into headlines and the people are getting agi- 
tated. Here and there the agitation is running, as it did 
in the time of war, when all sorts of rumors found a ready 
audience and many men who ought to have known better 
fell victim to the terror of the times. These men have since 
been eating their own words in the most undignified fash- 
ion. It is always like this. Big lines sweep the mass of 
people off their feet and it is very easy to understand how 
the conservative British viewed the innovation of bristling 
headlines with much alarm, for the masses are swayed, 
at once, by a bold statement in large type. And really 
bold statements in large type are all. so far, that we have 
had on this question. There is much heat and little light. 
We, for one, refuse to believe, without the most convinc- 
ing proof, that men who have led this country and who 
have attained position through the searching process of 
public election, have been false to their faith and have used 
the offices which they have gained for the spoliation of 
their fellow citizens. It is too much to believe that the 
reserves of oil which were there, as a bulwark and defense 
of the nation in time of war, have been bargained away 



by their custodians so cheaply. We refuse also to believe 
that men of great wealth, who have a stake in the com- 
munity, to whom money is nothing, but who hope to leave 
a name unblemished to their children and to live in mem- 
ory as constructive engineers of progress and prosperity, 
could, so far forget the interests of their country as to se- 
duce its officers and plunder its wealth. 

No, the thing is too monstrous to be credible. The ped- 
dlers of sensation have overplayed their hand and have 
fallen victims to their own delusions. They have hypno- 
tised themselves with their own headlines. This often hap- 
pens with those who wish to play upon the sensibilities 
of other people. In other words, the sensation has gotten 
out of hand. 

The thing should be stopped before it involves the entire 
form of government in contempt and raises against the 
republic, which we all love, a storm of execration which 
will be dangerous to the well being of all of us. 

Of course it began from partisan motives. There were 
those who were anxious for political reasons to cast dis- 
credit upon the leaders of the governmental party. But 
there is a place where partisanship may become inimical 
to the best interests of the country itself, and where the 
party politician becomes actually a menace to the state. 

Washington's birthday recalls that in his time the great 
president was charged with aiming at absolute power and 
with attempting to make the Revolution serve his own per- 
sonal interests. There were those at that time who used 
the same harsh language as is being used today. But time 
has thoroughly vindicated the character of Washington and 
has shown the iniquity and triviality of those who belab- 
ored him. 

So we say "Go easy !" Do not be misled by headlines 
and clamor; insist upon facts and then digest them at 
leisure. This country is strong and time is with us. 



We have been loath to think that the at- 

What About tacks which have been made on the behav- 

The Children ior of school children had any other basis 

than mere love of criticism and ultra puri- 

tanism. 

But a letter has been issued from the public school de- 
partment, signed by the principals of high schools and the 
Superintendent of Schools, which seems to show that the 
matter is really serious. The letter calls upon parents to 
aid in certain respects the struggle of the schools to main- 
tain decency. It is really a disturbing document as may 
be seen from the following extracts : 

"The invitations that meet our young people on every 
side are so many, and frequently so attractive, that the 
duties of home and school are made to suffer, and habits 
of sustained effort in the pursuit of a worthy goal are not 
formed. We are asking that the parents unite with the 
teachers in exercising great care with respect to the char- 
acter of entertainments their sons and daughters attend. 
We wish to call attention to the evil influences that fre- 
quently follow the unrestricted use of the automobile, and 
the inadvisability of allowing boys and girls in their teens 
to take so called 'joy rides.' 

"We believe that there is a perversion of the modern 
method of dancing which has done much to break down 
respect for womanhood. We feel that no effort on our part 
can counteract this evil unless parents realize the danger 
and help us maintain a wholesome standard. We believe 
that in accordance with the State Law, pupils should re- 
frain from smoking. We believe that mothers will unite 
with teachers in the effort to secure modesty and simplicity 
in standards of dress for high school girls." 

Nobody can say that the demands of the document are 
unreasonable; on the contrary, they are highly commend- 
able. But it is a strange comment on the times that such 
a document should have been considered necessary. 



February 23, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 





Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 

IS :t a "K.K tt k k « K .«".« i! K..T :: k u >! >: :: £;» .x .8 ); u x 8 :- x « » n K ;: :: :t a it k )i ii 8818 

U( ; 1 N clouds of scandal Inner over the nation's capi- 
tal, but the calm hand of the President is raised, and 
the suspected are saved from destruction under the shelter 
of investigation. 

President Coolidge uses few words, a mark of strong' 
character, and nobody points to his record as weak in acts. 
Instead of uttering a verbose dissertation on what has hap- 
pened on the people's losses through dishonesty, he di- 
rectly says there will be criminal prosecution. 

All must wait on investigation, though an indignant pub- 
lic already reaches forth its hand to unseat a cabinet of- 
ficer or two. In cases of this sort it is but natural that 
the people are impatient to strike some one. They don't 
want their anger to cool off, and they fear, perhaps, that 
time will give partisans opportunity to mystify them as 
to who is who about the guilt that is certainly lodged some- 
where, and scandal is looming up so fast that it becomes 
the more difficult to check their anger. So far it is pretty 
well established that some $300,000,000 has been lost in 
the Veterans' Bureau, and valuable oil lands have gone 
astray. 

Let not too much stress be laid upon the innocent not 
being made to suffer, rather let the fact be broadcasted 
repeatedly until there is no particle of doubt that the guilty 
shall be punished. 

It is easier for a camel to get through the eye of a needle 
than William G. McAdoo to secure the presidency. From 
his connection with the oil interests McAdoo is reported 
the recipient of lucre well up to the attractive six figures. 
His opportunity was based on the fact that he was a law- 
yer. Now, Dudley Field Malone says he never could earn 
$10,000 a year under that title, and that as he had once 
been a cabinet officer, and the late president's son-in-law, 
he might have seen the possible reasons why Mr. Doheny 
and Mr. Sinclair offered him so much plum-fruit. Mr. Ma- 
lone put it as frankly as he could by saying that William 
G, McAdoo was ethically all wrong. It is a commercial 
age. Boodle, boodle, boodle! Art is tinged with it. SO is 
education, and honor, too. 

!fc * * 

Again, Howard Carter is not satisfied with the permis- 
sion to dig through the sacred precincts of King Tutank- 
hamen's tomb; he must needs, despite what he has gained 
as a scientist, get into a quarrel with the Egyptian gov- 
ernment, because he wants to cop all the money, that is 
to accrue in a literary way. from this enterprise. 

* * * 

The other night at a silver offering concert, where you 
entered free, but got out the best way you could, almost 
every speaker asking for contributions, used an infant's 
voice as a persuasive. The inference was, that all there 
were supposed to be just children. Money was wanted for 
an organ or something, and namby-pamby stories were in- 
dicted on the attendance to get it. We were I'ollvauuaed 
and Daddy-Long-Legged until shaken silly. One racon- 
teur almost Lisped the adventure of a little engine that 
lacked the steam to get up a hill. — but it "choo-chooed and 
choo-chooed" and said "1 can — 1 can— 1 can" until despite 
the fact that 1 evilly wished it would burst apart, the speak- 
er got it to the summit of the incline. 

Why this baby-acting? 

* * * 

Mrs. Olivia Lakeland Dunn made terms in her will that 
her twelve prize puppies be chloroformed. It might be 
that Mr-. Dunn thought it was not possible to find some- 



body who would treat these dogs kindly; if not that, she 
wanted nobody else to obtain the joy of possession of the 
breeded animals. Xo doubt the lady is, or was. an estim- 
able woman, but it looks to us that she has given another 
proof that love is often only selfishness. 

The body gives out before the mind. If we had not 
sought, or believed in, a hereafter before, we would think 
in that trend at the last with the mind alert, and the rest 
t|iiite gone. What is the composition of the mind that 
keeps it alive until it has no body for which to function? 

Mrs. Julia A. Brodley, of Berkeley, will have sung at her 
funeral a short hymn she composed while dying. She had 
been in a coma, and having regained consciousness, the doc- 
tors said she had but a few hours to live, then she chanted 
the hymn to her daughter. 

Is there such a thing as a bone fide beggar? If there is, 
the necessity of this lowest form of appeal must be ex- 
ceptional, for the last thing a man does in this life is to ask 
something for nothing. He would take your money from 
you in stacks sooner than beg it in small pieces. Beggars 
flock to the milder climes, where they wail for food, shelter 
being a minor consideration. Because of the numerous pan- 
handlers in San Francisco the denizen grows hardened to 
the tear behind the extended hand. 
* * * 

Have you ever met him? — Dr. Richard Bruber de Gilady. 
He is nice looking, youngish. He even has an innocent 
look, but they arrested him on the charge of obtaining 
charity funds on false premises. It is stated that he had 
been at this some time in other cities mingling with gulli- 
ble American society and posing as an official Hungarian 
diplomat, but it was the Hungarian legation at Washing- 
ton that requested his arrest. The minions of the law took 
him in tow at the Fairmont hotel where he was making 
arrangements to stage on February 20th a musical tea for 
the benefit of children in Hungary. He has many patrons 
and patronesses in San Francisco, and hints himself that 
he is engaged to the daughter of a banker here. So soon? 
— He has been in the city but a few months. 

After she was found strangled in New York, not a friend 
visited the bier of Louise Lawson, whom the dispatches 
call "the Broadway butterfly." Evidently the title is not 
worth a tinker's damn. 

They had to bring her body home to get a little sym- 
pathy. She was buried at Alvarado, Texas, where they 
called her the "curly-haired little tyke." This appelation 
meant more, for at her home town there they closed the 
stores in her honor, and the big-hearted friends of the "kid" 
came to her funeral from miles around. 

She had come back to where she started under tragic 
circumstances, and it is too bad she did not know how 
her own people at the very end did not believe the bad 
stories about her. Truly the Texans meant more in her 
life than the acquaintances she gained by what seemed to 
be a sort of cheap fame. 



NEW MEMBER IN OLD FIRM 
Joseph Mulvihill has joined the firm of Scott & Xewsom. 
General Insurance Brokers, whose offices are in the Insur- 
ance Exchange Bldg., at No. 433 California St. This cor- 
poration handles ten different lines of insurance. 



— Department heads of the San Francisco V. M. C. A. 
are in attendance at the annual convention of the State 
Y. M. C. A. which opened Friday in Modesto with leaders 
of the association from all parts of the state in attendance. 
Discussion of association activities with plans for broad- 
ening the scope of its work for men and boys occupy the 
attention of the assembled delegates. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 23, 1924 



UI 



ao 



ana History 



By Theodosia Durand, Formerly Director of Fine 

gHBlBilHSHlBSBBBBBBBBSSBBBESBBSBESBBSBBSBEBSBBlHS 

HAVING heard from some unremembered source that 
"America is rushing to oblivion in her motor cars," 
and realizing- that with "the present hurry it would take 
a very short time to arrive, and once there, there would 
be such a long time to stay, the writer attempted to en- 
veigle a certain number of San Franciscans into the Golden 
Gate Park museum to listen to brief talks on Greek sculp- 
ture. But during the year that her talks occurred there 
fortnightly, gratis, three friends of hers halted for twenty- 
live minutes; the rest of the time only the plaster casts 
listened very unagitatedly to the story of their birth and 
the secret of* their supreme grace and charm. Sometimes it 
occurs that children will ask who the Greeks were, and 
then enlightened parents will expatiate on the beauty ol 
Hellenic sculpture and what history relates of their prow- 
ess in painting, and of the idiosyncrasies that impelled them 
to strive to beautify their lives — that is unless we live in 
San Francisco, when we scratch our heads if our hair is 
bobbed and we can arrive at the scalp without too much 
inconvenience; but if it is a head-of-a-family head, sleek 
with bandoline and we are afraid to make a part in it. 
as parts are not in fashion, we scratch it behind the ear 
where it does not matter, and say, "I think they keep 
grocery shops or maybe they are Menians." If it is a ques- 
tion of the Phoenicians, ah. . . eh. it is not so surprising 
that we have to inquire of some rare Paris archaeoligist. as 
this people, while here, were strictly devoted to commerce 
and to dashing in ships — in default of autos — straight to 
oblivion. 

It seems likely that should any one in the future ages 
beg to know who Calif ornians were, not even heaven itself 
will be able to respond to their prayer, since the only traces 
of a country's past lie in its monuments of art. Having 
been accustomed during a period of 25 years to seeing the 
population of Paris, from high to low, lay aside every 
thing, to turn out for varnishing day at the Salons, it had 
occurred to the writer that here where there is so much 
more wealth, the modern artist should be in an artist's 
paradise. 

The archaic usually arouses a wide grin on the faces 
of a younger people. But when Mr. Trask went to the 
other end of the world and brought the best it had to 
offer and put it in the Palace of Fine Arts for you to ad- 
mire and acquire did you do so, O Calif ornians ? No, you 
preferred to go to the annex and have a hearty laugh at 
the expense of the failures in art. Do you think Mr. Trask 
and Mr. Laurvik, who have passed their lives in the study 
of the fine arts and are eminently fitted by such an edu- 
cation to pass upon them, know as much as you who have 
passed yours in successfully avoiding exhibitions or other 
educational sources? And who knows best what art is, 
you or the artist? Why you, who have given no time to 
acquiring any notions on the subject, of course. You are 
already replying brilliantly "I know what I like." No you 
don't. How can you when you know nothing whatever 
about it and like nothing? Some of you are even yet hur- 
ling the word cubist at the poor unoffending artist's head, 
not having taken the pains to inquire that this mode of 
painting "more observed in the breach than the custom," 
so much reviled by those who had seen none of the real 
article, was interred some five or six years ago. 

Why did you not acquire some of the 225 very good 
works at the recent Industries Show exhibit, at the Audi- 
torium, by conservative masters in the style of some forty 
years ago? After all. is not the artist himself the best 



Arts Department, University of Washington 

w 

ftlft ft IS*I'« »? 8 SB :< 8 w ft ft it ft ft >t ■« :t imj ft it ft ft it ft a it it it it it it ft it it it Si 

judge of style and good methods of obtaining effects? Is 
it possible that there were not 225 families in California 
able to buy with ease one or more of the paintings ex- 
hibited there? This is to expose a penury that you would 
be averse to admitting. You that stone the prophets of 
art. the intellectual and best that your state affords, for 
which of these admirable works DO YOU stone them? 

Helena Dunlap's beautiful paintings of India met with 
similar neglect at the Palace of Fine Arts, where nobody 
visited them, because it was too far away you said, and 
then expressed a preference for French paintings. A mod- 
est French landscapist of highest worth, living in our 
midst, (just as fine — although different — as Corot,- — so 
snobbishly venerated because of undue prices placed on his 
work, after his death.) finds himself obliged to send his 
work to war-devastated France in order to sell it — and 
$300 is obtained, where $10, the price asked here, was not 
obtainable. Do we mean to say that work as good as 
Corot's is being painted by artists of our land and in 
Marin County? 

In the recent exhibit they were highly successful in ren- 
dering these beauties, but the real failures are the people 
who do not sustain the artist in his honest efforts to carry 
on Ins artistic career; and when they have reared their 
children to mock at the painter and his art as they them- 
selves do — even at the instructors of our institutions — then 
the much-coveted oblivion will be ours. They will ask 
why painters do not take up a trade where they will be 
useful members of society like themselves and say : "we 
cannot loaf around and paint and make our way through 
life." Jealousy caused Cain to slay Abel because the lat- 
ter's offering was an acceptable one. Recently a French 
artist was lured to our cit\ I where few works by native 
artists are sold), having been told by a citizen that here 
in a land of well-to-do families with beautiful homes he 
would find a ready sale for his work, which is always in 
demand in his own land. What a grand and beautiful sur- 
prise had he sold a single one! The worst surprise was, 
however, that a few of his pictures are to be converted 
by some enterprising firm into chromos. The horror of 
the lurid chromo could have been avoided by buying an 
original painting at less than the cost of a reproduction. 



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SAN FRANCISCO 



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ELMER M. WOODBURY Manager 



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$75.00 



February 23, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



Perhaps Luther Burbank may of a violet and a crocus 
make a hibrid flower, but will it have the fragrance of 
one or the beauty of the other? 

A lady, returning here from England, having been im- 
pressed l>y the sight of so many family portraits during 
her visit to the old country, offered to paint her country- 
men for the benefit of posterity, to preserve the branches 
Of the family tree. She was told that she must do some- 
thin- more in keeping with the needs of the people and 
upon inquiring as to their taste was informed that it ran 
to eating largely, and a position as waitress would be of- 
fered. Necessity knows no law, and remembering how 
Betty de Jong, finding return to her war-stricken land im- 
possible and the outlook in California despairful, took her 
own life, (how the harpies feeding- on renown thus gained 
for this most talented girl's art offerings, flew down and 
bought the work, will he recalled by many), she allowed 
herself to be led from an agency to a sort of eating house 
in Third street below Howard, where a wage of twelve 
dollars a week smiled at her. She had had great exper- 
iences herself in the matter — of eating, but after an hour 
the chef who was also the proprietor of the bouge, not only 
fired her for being- awkward at getting; a soft-boiled egg 
out of its shell while it was still red hot and burning her 
artistic fingers, but fired the contents of the egg cup after 
her as well, and did not even offer the hungry Woman her 
lunch! As the lady in question happened to be the writer 
of the Unhappy mementos she can vouch for the authen- 
ticity. 

When Nicholas Poussin returned from Italy to his own 
land of France, three countries fought for possession of 
his paintings and disputed the honor of his presence. To- 
day in France provision is made for the struggling artist 
so that he may continue to build up the reputation of the 
land. Philanthropy houses him, as it recognizes his im- 
portance to the growth of the people. Perhaps some day 
some one would wish to know what Marin County looked 
like before it was hidden by factories and R. R. tracks; 
into whose houses will he go to find the Clauds and Pous- 
sins of our times? The wretched penury observed, where 
the walls are devoted to reproductions or photos in black 
and white, and the word "aesthetics" brings a smile of 
ignorance to the host's face, leads one to believe that 
Shortly "their houses shall be left unto them desolate." 
* # * 

The people of the Golden State, though not precisely hos- 
tile to painters themselves, are indifferent as to whether 

they perish from off the face of the earth or not. So that 
artists will remain where they are able to pay for the 
roof over their heads. Beware of those who prate of our 
being an art-loving class out here, and do not count on 
the sales of paintings in the West to fill the little stock- 
ings hung every year by the fireside at Xmas tide. Good 
will to men will be sung, but no money spent on the ar- 
tist who has perhaps devoted his whole life, so far. to pro- 
ducing these contributions towards a barren world's em- 
bellishment and the consequent uplifting of the hearts of 
mankind. 



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—An eminent architect was being examined in the course 
ol a law-suit by a barrister, who was using every effort 
in his power to depreciate the witness's opinion. "You are 
a builder. 1 believe?" said the counsel. "No, sir; 1 am not 
a builder; I am an architect." "Ah, well, builder or archi- 
tect—architect or builder— they are pretty much the same, 
1 suppose?" "I beg your pardon." said the witness; "they 
are totally different." "Oh. indeed! Perhaps you would 
state wherein this great difference consists." "An architect, 
sir, conceives the design, prepares the plan, draws out the 
specification — in short, supplies the mind. The builder is 
merely the machine, the architect is the power that puts 
the machine together arid sets it going." "Oh, very well, 
Mr. Architect; that will do! A very ingenious distinction 
without a difference. Do you happen to know who was 
the architect of the Tower of Babel?" "There was no arch- 
itect, sir," was the reply; "hence the confusion." 

* * * 

— It was at the end of the trial, resulting- in conviction 
of an oil promoter, who was caught in the net of the postal 
authorities' investigation of oil frauds recently in Fort 
Worth, Tex. 

The judge asked the defendant if he had anything to say 
or to request. 

"Your Honor," said the promoter, "would it be possible 
to choose or select my place of confinement?" 

"What difference would it make?" said the judge, "you 
are going to be away for two years anyway." 

"I should rather be sent to the Atlanta prison than the 
one at Leavenworth." responded the promoter, "because 
the warden at Leavenworth bought 2000 shares of my 
stock." 

* % 4p 

—A negro met an acquaintance of his. also colored, on 
the street one day and was surprised to see that his friend 
had on a new suit, new hat. new shoes and other evidences 
of prosperity. 

"Hey. boy," he said, "how come you dressed up this 
way? Is you got a job?" 

"I'se got somethin' bettern' any job," replied the other, 
Tse got a profession." "What is it?" "I'se a orator." 
"What's a orator?" "Don't you know?" replied the resplen- 
dent one in surprise. "Well, I'll tell you what a orator is. 
If you was to walk up to a ordinary nigger and ask him 
how much was two and two, he'd say 'four.' but if you 
ask one of us orators how much was two and two he'd 
say, 'When in de cou'se of human events it becomes nec- 
essary to take de numeral of de second denomination and 
add it to de figger two, I says unto you and I says it with- 
out fear of successful contradiction, dat de result will in- 
vari'bly be four.' Dat's a orator." 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 23. 1924 



AUTO ITEMS 

California Tops are gaining in pop- 
ularity. 



Nash has another new model. — the 
low-priced Xash Six Special Sedan. 

Frank L. Klingensmith. President 
of the Gray Motor Corporation, is 
here to see what sort of reception 
his new car, — the Gray, will receive. 



C. Harold Wills, builder of the 
Wills-Sainte Claire, and Walter P. 
Chrysler, of Maxwell. Chalmers & 
Chrysler, arrived last Tuesday. 



Captain Eddie Rickenbacker, maker 
of tht car bearing his name, left 
Tuesday for the south. Captain Rick- 
enbacker has not missed a show for 
the last eisfht vears. 



Sales Manager O. C. Hutchinson 
of the Hupp Motor Company, was 
given a rousing reception this week. 



J. Fred Woodruff, general man- 
ager of the Campbell-Ewald Com- 
pany, was in town for the Auto Show. 
The advertising of all the units for 
the General Motors group, which in- 



"Artistic 
Bits 



of the University of Cal- 
ifornia" is the title of 
an interesting page in 
next Sunday's Rotagra- 
"vure Section, showing 
views of several of the 
college buildings and 
some of their most at- 
tractive features from 
architectural and artis- 
tic viewpoints. Another 
timely page portrays the 
"End of the 



Nation's 

War Leader-" 

This is a grouping of 
scenes showing various 
incidents connected with 
the death of Woodrow 
Wilson, and graphically 
depicting the grief of the 
Nation. There are many 
other features, interest- 
ing and educational; in 
fact, all the worth-while 
news of the world, is 
told pictorially in The 

Sunday Chronicle 

Rotagravure 

Section 



eludes the Cadillac, Buick, Chevrolet, 
Oakland and Oldsmobile, are handled 
In- this Company. Its main offices are 
located in Detroit. 



The complete Buick line, with its 
two new models, is one of the chief 
centers at the Auto Show. 



The balloon tire makes the easiest 
riding 1 . 



The F. J. Linz Company, distribu- 
tes of the Columbia. Liberty and Na- 
tional lines, is presenting a special 
showing of its cars at the Company's 
salesrooms. Brake styles, with lock- 
head hydraulics are featured. 



An interesting exhibit of chassis 
and coachwork is arranged by W. S. 
Porter, newly appointed manager fur 
Rolls-Royce in the show rooms of 
the local branch on Van Xess avenue. 



J. W. Dunivan, manager of the 
Cadillac Motor Car Company, arrived 
Tuesday of this week in San Fran- 
cisco on a hurryup swing around 
the western territory. 



C. S. Howard, of the Howard Auto- 
mobile Company, and C. S. Howard. 
Jr., returned Monday from a ten- 
days' trip td Los Angeles. 



SPEEDING UP 



In another department of this pub- 
lication, we mention the dangerous 
habit of racing each other up Mar- 
ket Street, which is practiced by the 
Municipal and United street car lines, 
at times resulting in deplorable acci- 
dents, and always bewildering the 
would-be passenger who has to rush 
in front or behind the Municipial 
chariots to board the United. And 
we proposed that the cars be sep- 
arated by a time limit, and that they 
strictly adhere to that schedule along 
the city's main artery. 

Something of this "speeding up" 
characteristic might come in very sat- 
isfactorily if applied to the members 
of the committee appointed by Mayor 
Rolph a year and a half ago, to in- 
vestigate and form plans for the pur- 
chase of the United Railways by the 
Municipal Railway. Two big ques- 
tions regarding this purchase have 
been settled : the approximate price, 
and the manner in which this price 
is to be secured. So much was ac- 
complished at the recent meeting of 
the committee. Now the people of 
San Francisco want to see their street 
car lines unified into a well work- 
ing whole, one system of transfers to 
all parts of the municipality. In other 
words, we want a good "speeding 
up" on the subject of purchasing the 
Market Street Railway! 



Every time the teacher asked Johnny 
a question she always got the same 
answer. "I don't know." "Johnny," she 
said, "what is twice eight?" "Don't 
know." "Well, then, four times six?" 
"Don't know." "Who was the husband 
of Queen Victoria?" "Don't know." 
The teacher became exasperated. "Is 
there anything you can answer?" she 
asked sardonically. "Yes'm." he re- 
plied. "And what is that, pray?" "The 
telephone, ma'am." — London Answers. 



ym^ 



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• 



STAGE Training 

NATHANIEL ANDERSON 
Coach 

Director — Pacific Players 

THE LEGITIMATE WAY 

This is actual practice; no theory nor 
false methods; vital; professional. 

STUDIO 

500 Rohler & (has.. ISIdg. 

Kearny 5454 



February 23, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



TownMLCRIER 




Q who the devil art THOU 

/jUT 'ONE THKT WILL PLM THE 
pJ\vE7 P £VIL ,S"tWITH VOU" 

' ^TW — S/iakspeare- . 



— Twenty five hundred charter members, at a fee of 
fifty dollars per head, is regarded as enough to put the San 
Francisco Opera Company on a solid basis. It is a very 
good scheme, if it can be carried out, for with a basic group 
of that size the venture should have enough foundation 
among the people to make it stick. The trouble with most 
culture societies of that sort is that they are confined to 
t • >< > limited a circle of adherents. The personnel of the com- 
mittee is admirable, with just enough sprinkling of high 
financiers. 

* * * 

— The '"Recorder" painstakingly sets out the ethics in 
certain legal matters and particularly with regard to the 
collection of money and all that sort of thing. I don't 
blame the "Recorder," which is an admirable paper. There 
is, however, an awful lot of hypocrisy about all this ethics 
business. Small practice is unethical, but good big cor- 
poration stuff is thoroughly ethical under all conditions. 
Lawyers have been a tricky and humbugging lot from the 

beginning of organized society. It just can't be helped. 

* * * 

— It is a pretty kettle of fish, when the principals of fif- 
teen high schools admit the constant violation of the frat. 
I don't care a bit about the frat law and have doubts as 
to its wisdom, as of the wisdom of practically all laws, 
which are prohibitive of reasonable personal liberty. But, 
if it is a law, it is a law, and that the principals of schools 
would wink at its violation is gravely detrimental to the 
state as well as to the individual pupil. We are informed 
that the frat business is "small town stuff." 

— Dudley Field Malone is going in for educating us 
here, and does it with such a kindly air that we cannot 
well resent it. But we have known equally powerful ex- 
ponents of foreign policy become very unpopular in San 
Francisco. Of all the gifts that the good gods give, per- 
sonal charm is the most useful, as well as the most delight- 
ful; and when Dudlev Field Malone sprang from the void 
into the light of day. he brought with him more than the 

average share of charm. 

* * * 

— There is a terrible attack of culture just now in Berke- 
ley and it is taking the form of a war on "For Sale" signs 
on property. The visitor to Berkeley is nut supposed to 
be able to see anything so vulgar; that is. the cultured 
Eastern visitor. As for the Californian, the elimination of 
the signs will, it is thought, drive him to the real estate 
office. The office thus becoming the objective as it were, 
the "realtor" becomes a professional and ranks with a doc- 
tor. Lewis never thought of anything as good as that in 
"Babbitt." 

* * * 

— It has grown into a regular game between Dodie 
Valencia and the Supreme Court with respect to her claims 
on the Baird Estate. Five times the Court has blocked 
her and five times she has come up smiling. It will be in- 
teresting to sec. however, if she has any kick left after this 

latest and most complete block on her volley. 

* * * 

— One thousand citizens are to compel obedience to the 
traffic laws in Oakland, flu- killing of three little children 
on the streets 1>\ careless drivers has given impetus to 
(he movement. But it ^ a very temporal expedient; fur one 
thousand citizens cannot be on duty, as a regular thing. 
Better remedies must be sought in other directions. 



— In the death of Max Kuhl. we have lost a very able 
man who might have had a very distinguished future. There 
was a great deal ahead of him and he had the courage and 
the physical strength to pursue his ends which were al- 
ways of the most enlightened and social character. We 
have had hard luck lately with some of our most promis- 
ing mature leaders. 

— We see no end to the dispute with regard to the Hetch 
lletchy and power and the Supervisors have ordered the 
expenditure of $800,000 for a step-down station. I am sure 
I do not know where they got the authority, but it seems 
as if a certain pair of papers can set the Supervisors jump- 
ing by mere headlines. Where does the tax payer get a 
look in? History fails to record. 



— It is not everywhere that fishermen can go out and 
land a sea lion, as some of our Italians did the other day. 
They were fishing in Sausalito Bay and got four hundred 
pounds of sea lion in their nets. They are not satisfied, 
neither is the sea lion, wdio is tied up to a post at Fisher- 
man's Wharf. 

— Judge Kerrigan says that he has achieved the object 
of his life in his promotion to the federal bench. A man 
is always to be congratulated when he has thus achieved, 
so we extend our felicitations to Judge Kerrigan. But, as 
a matter of fact, we wonder how anyone can prefer the ter- 
rors of noisy litigation to the quiet and remote calm of 
opinion — writing in the Supreme Court chambers! 



CLOSED DOORS 

Thoughts are my wind-birds, resting under trees ; 

Or silver poppies in a moon-lit field. 

They are like mute stone gods that hug their knees ; 

They are like fragrance that a tomb has sealed. 

Once they were rampant in the tropic sun, 

They were flame-flowers lifted to -the skies. 

They danced like stars; but now, their dancing -done, 

They are like beauties faded and grown wise. 

Oh, once what careless thoughts and beautiful 
My mind raised on its sturdy youthful stem ! 
And I went, laughing like an April fool, 
With spendthrift hands that only cared to make 
Bouquets of them for you . . . who would not take 
The offered gifts, but hooted scorn at them. 

— Idella Purnell, in Poetry. 



OVERLAND MONTHLY PRIZES 

The Overland Monthly Magazine has offered through 
the S. F. Branch of the American Pen Women, a prize of 
Fifty Dollars, to be awarded for the best short story ; man- 
uscript to be received not later than July 1st, 1924, and 
to be addressed to the Short Story Contest Editor, Over- 
land Monthly. No. 825 Phelan Bldg. This magazine has 
also offered Fifty Dollars for the best lyric poem, manu- 
script to be mailed before August 1st. 1924. to the Poetry 
Contest Editor, address as above. Further information will 
be given if solicited, by the Magazine. 



PUBLICITY MAN PASSES 
Philip Hastings, veteran theatrical and publicity agent. 
passed away quietly in his sleep, last Tuesday morning. 
For thirty years Mr. Hastings represented in turn prac- 
tically every theater in this city, from the old days when 
the Chutes were out on Haight Street, up to the present 
time. He was a Knight Templar, member of the Golden 
Gate Commandery. and a Native Son of the Golden West. 
He leaves a widow. Mrs. Ruby M. Hastings, and other rela- 
tives in Yisalia. 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 23, 1924 




CORD 



By ANTISTHENES 

BATTING dishonors were about even last year in the 
California Counties Base Boose League, according to 
a report submitted to Prohibition Commissioner Ray A. 
Haynes at Washington. According to the report "San Fran- 
cisco knows how" to be the "worst offender in the state" 
and is motivating from "worst" to whatever degree may 
be lower than that; next "worst" is Sonoma county, where 
things have come to such a pass that bootleggers' com- 
mercial drummers pass up the place as "poor territory" on 
account of the bad citizens there being over-stocked with 
"bad" stuff; Marin county has fallen out of the race of 
godlimss and is labelled "Extremely bad"; Alameda is 
described as "good, bad and indifferent" but even this luke- 
warm status is spoiled by one "Emeryville" which is dubbed 
"deplorable"; Yuba is "still" deplorable, but the report 
didn't mean that for a joke, as it further states how in that 
county, Marysville elected as councilman a person con- 
victed of bootlegging and that bootleggers served on 
juries! Sacramento is described a calloused booze sinner, 
and San Mateo, the "home of roadhouses." Little is said 
of Los Angeles, probably because there's so much "private 
stock" down there they don't have to "break" the law ; 
San Diego hath its Tiajuana, Del Xorte county is beyond 
redemption. Lake county "moonshiners are getting readv 
for a big summer season," Solano is in the basement of 
the bottomless pit where who goes in "leave hope behind" 
of emerging sober; Siskiyou is "the moonshiners' Mecca" 
and so unto the end — though some say this is but the be- 
ginning-. 



— The navy, once the pride of all Americans, is now un- 
fit, not structurally, but morally, to uphold its cherished 
traditions, according to C. K. Spencer, U. S. X.. editor of 
the "U. S. Navy." Such was his impression after witness- 
ing the recent theoretical attack on and defense of the 
Panama Canal. "Rotten morale" and "use of dope," accord- 
ing to him. the contributing causes of the present condi- 
tion, is an aftermath of the molly coddling of this branch 
of a national defense inaugurated by losephus Daniels, for- 
mer secretary of the navy. There's "dope" for the asking 
in every foreign port. and. if the sailonnan cannot have 
his ale, he takes opiates. Shortsightedly we abrogated nat- 
ural laws, and then expectantly watched for the jackies to 
sprout wings. 



— To the slogan "Government of the people, by the peo- 
ple, for the people" might be added "in benevolent assimi- 
lation with the collie." if Secretary of State Hughes real- 
izes on his suggestion to leave the Japs in. We might, in 
the matter of Mongolian and black immigration, take a 
lesson from England, who, as a writer recentlv said of her. 
"is politically immoral when it comes to protecting- the 
destinies of her own race." 



— The Board of Education's invitation to pupils to at- 
tend their meeting apropos the $12,000,000 school con- 
structing was silly. Most of these lads and lassies, inured 
to short school hours and ample vacation, naturally would 
incline to the ball room-gymnasium-indoor-rifle-range tvpe 
of construction. 



— Ramsay Macdonald says houses will be built in Eng- 
land so as to rent for $1.98 per week. Local carpenters may 
now realize the age of miracles is not passed. 



— Leonard Wood, Jr., has invited three hundred clergy- 
men to witness the performance of his dramatized version 
of the sensational novel "Simon Called Peter." This is 
good advertising; some of the cloth will attend on the alibi 
that, to snare the devil, one must ascertain his rendezvous 
— that is better advertising. 



— News item. — Free State troops today began a drive 
to capture Christopher Brophy. — As Brophy is an ex-Re- 
publican soldier, an Irishman and also a bandit, we con- 
cede a reason for employing the armv. 



— And now Ramsay Macdonald says world peace is 



sible only if co-operation comes fror 
dictionaries may define "co-operation' 
of the L'nited States." 



pos- 
America! Future 
"The legal tender 



— Recently, Professor Harold Heath of Stanford Uni- 
versity spent a couple of hours explaining how monkeys 
made men of themselves but he did not even comment 
on how men reverse the aforesaid process. 



All in all Washington won't think much of our sobriety 
— but then, the silver lining is: the report may bring out 
an unprecedented crowd of thirsty easterners to us the 
coming summer. 



— With hundred thousand dollar gifts tossed about so 
carelessly, small wonder gasoline went up. Now. if a few 
of the tossers "went up" possibly oil would go down. 

— It's likely the old alibi "supply and demand," used so 
frequently to account for price raises, connects "supply of 
bribers and demand of takers.'' 



— The story of how the inconsequential sheet "Marion 
Star" was sold for $550,000 should quicken the sense of 
importance proverbial of the little Gopher Prairie editors. 



— Judging- by the pile of scandals Congress will have 
to mop up during its coming sessions, there'll be scant 
opportunity for new legislation; so. "it's an ill wind, etc." 



—Liquor is now so easily obtained that many who started 
drinking because it was prohibited are once again on the 
water wagon. Most of the "kick" in drink is it's inhibition. 

— "The mills of the gods grind slowly" — specifically those 
down by the old oil pool at Teapot Dome. 

-And again the cause of all this scandal is the oilmighty 
dollar. 



'DRAWING LESSONS :: PORTRAITURE 

SHORT CUTS TAUGHT COMMERCIAL ARTISTS 
Evenings and Saturday Afternoons 
I860 Post si. Phone: West 




MARY HERETH 



CAROLINE JONES 



Luncheon is served from 1 1 : 30 to 2:30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 

334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7118 



ws***s«M«3e****s«**jsj»6st*3ats^^ 



Februan 23, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 




By KBM 

"Poetry makes immortal all that is best and beau- 
tiful in the world." — Shelley. 

TUESDAY evening-. February 12th, the California Writ- 
ers' Club gave a Poets' Dinner at Varsity Hall, Berk- 
eley. The guests of honor were Ina Coolbrith, our Poet- 
laureate, and Jessie B. Rittenhouse, one of the founders of 
the Poetry Society of America. One of the distinguished 
guests present was Dr. Mary McKibben-Harper of the Chi- 
cago Bookfellows, the patron and friend of poets. She gave 
a witty, enlightening little talk and encouraged all schools 
ol poets by saying- that when she read a lyricist effusion,— 
she thought that was the best until she happened upon 
some imagist outpouring, and was enraptured by that; in 
lad. she could be enthused by either traditionalists or pro- 
ducers of free verse, so she felt she really didn't know any 
thing about poetry at all— or else all were equally admir- 
able — even a "grotesque" when you gut used to it. 

Fanny Hodges Newman of San Diego and Henry Meade 
Bland of San Jose were both inspirational speakers, fessie 
Rittenhouse, author of two Anthologies of Modern Verse 
and LITTLE BOOK OF AMERICAN POETS, recited 
some of her most popular poems, as they were called for 
by enthusiastic guests, and gave a picturesque account of 
the founding of the Poets' society and its many branches, 
assuring her hearers of the increasing interest in poetry and 
quality of poetical work being done at the present time in 
America. Charles Kee'er, "holding to artistic ideals," pre- 
sided. 

George Sterling recited a poem, — Edna .Aiken author 
of IF TODAY BE SWEET, gave a happy little greeting 
when her name was called — Nancy Buckley came to her feet 
for a moment, and as all could see. is one who has arrived. 
Charles Caldwell Dobie and Harry Noyes Pratt were at 
the Speaker's table and ably did their part in enthusing 
the diners. The gaiety of the evening was added to. by 
the presence of Anna Blake Mezquida, rejoicing over re- 
cent publication of "That Streak of Granite" in January 
Holland's Magazine; and John Hamlin, whose "Haunted 
Spurs" has brought cash and fame, recently, from Street 
and Smith corporation, also scores of others who have re- 
cently placed verse and story. 

It was a memorable occasion, full of interest and feel- 
ing, especially as all stood to honor the presence of the 
beloved guest of the evening— Ina Coolbirth — ami isn't 
that far above MERE money? — TruK poets are the 
writers who receive love. 



OX Till-; TRAIL OF STEVENSON by Clayton Ham- 
ilton, with illustrations from Drawings by Walter Hale. 
is a new edition of one of the most personal and attrac- 
tive books about Robert Louis Stevenson. The reader is 
introduced lirst to the Stevenson home in Edinburgh, and 
we are told that being taken there is more than merely a 
sentimental journey, because Stevenson "with his quick 
eve lor localities, his keen enjoyment and his vivid recol- 
lection of them, may be said to have absorbed into him- 
self the many places, where he pitched his tent, until he 
was finally lured forth to the ultimate islands of the far 
Pacific;" therefore, the lovers of Stevenson will appre- 
ciate the chronological outline of his life given in tin 
of the book, and will follow him from the place of his 
birth in 1850 across the two seas to his final home. 



is laid to rest on the summit of Yaea Mountain. 
Samoa, in 1894. 

In 1879 Stevenson arrived in San Francisco, and lived 

lor a short time in a house at 608 Bush street. Here he 
uffered from a depression of spirits owing to limited cir- 
cumstances and ill health, and he speaks of himself al 
this time as "the penniless and dying author." lie lived. 
however, long enough to make a happy marriage also in 
this city, and to find out many years later that he could 
Uel as poor when earning $20,000 a year, as he did when 
living on forty-five cents per day in San Francisco, — and 
that poverty is only a point of view, after all. 
Doubleday, Page and Co., $-'. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



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Tickets to all points 
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of scenic surprises 
including-^ 

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to go and we will sub- 
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R. l). Johnson, l>iv. ['ass. Agent, <!<>! Market St • 

Market street Ferry. Both Phones: Sutter 7600. S;m Francisco 

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«* PAUL ELDER'S 

J AND PAUL ELDBB'H I.IIIRARY 

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12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 23, 1924 




ooiery 



busy curm 

MISS BEATRICE BRANDT, daughter of Mrs. Belle Brandt and 
the late Mr E H. Biandt, became the bride of Mr. Edmund 
Rossi at St. Brigid's Church in Van Ness avenue Tuesday 
morning. The ceremony was held at 11 o'clock. Most Rev- 
erend Edward J. Hanna officiating, while Monsignor Charles 
Ramm celebrated the nuptial mass. Mrs. Brandt gave her 
daughter in marriage. Mrs. Nion Tucker was the matron 
of honor. The bridesmaids were Miss Beatrice Rossi and Miss 
Katherine Buckley. Miss Patricia Tobin was the flower girl. 
Mr. Robert Rossi was his brother's best man. and the ushers 
were Mr. Frank O'Connor. Mr. Theodore Murphy. Mr. Nelson 
Hacket and Mr. Carlo Rossi. After the marriage the rela- 
tives and members of the bridal party repaired to the resi- 
dence of Mrs. Ferdinand Thieriot. a cousin of the bride, at 
her home in Gough street, where the wedding breakfast was 
held. 

MISS KINAU WILDER, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James 
Wilder of Honolulu, has announced her engagement to Lieu- 
tenant Charles Butler McVay, III. U. S. N., the son of Ad- 
miral and Mrs. Charles Butler McVay Jr. Word of the be- 
trothal, which was announced at a large reception at the 
Honolulu home of Mr. and Mrs. Wilder, has just reached their 
friends here. 

MRS. BLANCHE KELLEHER HIXON and Mr. Spencer Grant 
have set the date of their wedding for April 30. The marriage 
will take place in Pasadena at the home of Mrs. Hixon's 
sister. Mrs. Byron McNulty. After their wedding trip, the 
couple will make their home in San Francisco. The engage- 
ment was announced a week ago. 

THE MICHAELS-DARLING wedding will be solemnized March 
25th in the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. 
Michaels, in Buchanan street. Besides Mrs. Preston Hoteh- 
kiss, who will be matron of honor, the attendants will be 
Miss Margaret Monroe, who will be the maid of honor, and 
Mrs. Hilyer Brown and Miss Virginia Gohn of Alameda, who 
will be the bridesmaids. Mr. Herbert Darling will be his 
brother's best man, and among the other groomsmen will be 
Mr. Hilyer Brown. Mr. Robert Lipman and Mr. Bradley 
Brown. Mr. and Mrs. Michaels left San Francisco for the 
Hawaiian Islands a week ago and they will visit there, prin- 
cipally in Honolulu, until early in March. They expect to 
return to their home here about March 11. 

MISS ELIZABETH TERRY, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Wallace 
I. Terry, and Mr. Robertson Ward of Los Angeles announce 
their engagement. The news of the betrothal was told at a 
luncheon given by the bride-elect Saturday afternoon at her 
residence in Broadway. Miss Terry is a member of the Junior 
League and is popular in the younger society set. She is 
a graduate of the University of California. She is the sis- 
ter of Mr. Wallace I. Terry Jr. Mr. Ward is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Shirley C. Ward of Los Angeles and belongs to 
one of the best known families in the southern part of the 
state. 

MISS FRANCES PRINGLE and Mr. George MaeDonald, whose 
marriage was set for March 12, has postponed the event until 
a later date, awaiting the arrival of Mr. MacDonald's mother. 
Mrs. John Parker, from her home in Scotland. According 
to their present plans, the marriage will now take place some 
time in May, the exact date of which has not yet been de- 
termined. 

LUNCHEONS 

MRS. ADOLPH B. SPRECKELS gave a luncheon on Monday at 
the St. Francis in honor o,f Miss Marie Spreckels. Those pres- 
ent were: Miss Helen Hammersmith, Miss Aileen Brady, Miss 
Edna Taylor, Miss Edna Christensen, Miss Jean Howard. Miss 
Calla Hale. Miss Cecile Mohun, Miss Martha Mohun, Miss 
Dolly Payne. Miss Elizabeth Doak Towle. 

MRS. WILLIAM GWIN has asked a group of friends to accept 
her hospitality at a luncheon, which she will give at her 
home in Pacific avenue on February 28. 

MRS. T. EDWARD BAILEY was hostess at one of the attractive 
luncheon parties for the visitors, having friends at the Hotel 
St. Francis where the fashionable Monday throng gave a 
colorful aspect to the several dining rooms. The affair af- 
forded (he friends of Mrs. John F. Davis to greet her again 
after a long and trying illness. 

MRS. WHITELAW REID, who is paying her annual visit to 
California, was hostess at a large luncheon Monday at the 
old family home at Millbrae, which was attended by a num- 
ber of guests from town, as well as from the peninsula. 



MRS. SIDNEY BALLOU entertained Wednesday with a luncheon 
at her home complimenting Mrs. Franklin K. Lane. 

MISS AMY CRYAN gave an amusing and original luncheon on 
Wednesday to introduce Mrs. George Legh-Jones to her neigh- 
bors on the peninsula. The guests. Mrs. Leonardo Avernali, 
Mrs. George T. Cameron, Mrs. Gerald Campbell, Mrs. Thomas 
Driscoll and Mrs. Hugh de Haven, each cooked and served a 
course of the luncheon. 

MRS. JONATHAN KITTLE gave a luncheon last Friday at her 
home in Scott street and entertained Mrs. Joseph Donohoe, 
Mrs. Edward L. Eyre, Mrs. Willis Polk, Mrs. James Coffin, 
Mrs. Harry Sherman and Miss Laura McKinstry. 

MRS. BRENT TANNER, for whom a round of affairs have been 
given during her visit in San Francisco, was the incentive 
for a luncheon given Monday by Mrs. Alfred Ghirardelli. 

MRS. R. P. SCHWERIN was hostess Monday at a luncheon party 
in honor of Mrs. Whitelaw Reid, who is at Millbrae on her 
annual visit. 

TEAS 

MISS SUZANNE DE LENCLOS. the bride-elect of Mr. Edward 
L. Eyre Jr., for whom a round of affairs are being given 
before her marriage on March 1. was the incentive for an 
attractive tea given Monday afternoon by Mrs. Marshall Madi- 
son. The affair was held at the home of the hostess in Jack- 
son street, and assisting in receiving were: Mrs. Horace Van 
Sicklen, Mrs. Robert Lewis Coleman Jr.. Mrs. Alfred de Ropp, 
Mrs. George Monroe Pinckard. Miss Inez Macondray and Miss 
Mary Emma Flood. 

MRS. A. B. SPRECKELS was hostess at an informal tea in the 
laurel court of the Fairmont Hotel last Saturday afternoon. 

MRS. GAILLARD STONEY has issued cards for a tea to meet 
her sister. Mrs. Blake of Boston, who has been visiting at 
the Stoney home during the latter's absence abroad. Mrs. 
Blake will return to her home next month. The date of the 
tea is Tuesday. February 26. 

MRS. DANIEL C. HEGER and Mrs. S. Ralph Heger will give 
a reception on Thursday, February 28, at the home of the 
former, 242S Jackson street, in honor of Miss Leonore Kath- 
erine Fitzgibbon, sister of Mrs. S. R. Heger. The Fitzgibbon- 
Mohun wedding will be an event of the post-Easter season. 
Meantime Miss Fitzgibbon is being entertained at numerous 
affairs. 

MISS ISABEL BANNON entertained at a tea on Wednesday in 
the Laurel Court of the Fairmont in honor of Miss Lenore 
Fitzgibbon. 

MRS. THOMAS ROLPH entertained at a children's party Sat- 
urday afternoon for the friends of her little daughter, Miss 
Catherine Jane Rolph. It was a Valentine party and was 
held at the home of the hostess in Lake street. An interest- 
ing movie was shown for the pleasure of the little guests 
and another delightful feature w r as the presence of a ma- 
gician, who kept the children fascinated with his tricks. 
BRIDGE 

MRS. RICHARD SCHLESINGER. who recently returned from 
her honeymoon trip to Honolulu, and Miss Kathleen Keating 
of Cumberland. Md.. shared honors at a bridge party given 
Monday afternoon by Mrs. Charles S. Hobbs at her home 
in Lake street. Miss Keating arrived several days ago from 
her home in the East and is the house guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Hobbs. 

MISS LEONORE KATHERINE FITZGIBBON was the recipient 
of a large bridge luncheon given jointly by Mrs. Frederick 
Hihn and Mrs. Samuel Pauson at the Fairmont Hotel on 
Wednesday. 

DINNERS 

MR. AND MRS. CLIFFORD WEATHERWAX had a group of 
friends accept their hospitality at a dinner, which they gave 
on Friday at their home in Burlingame. Later, they and 
their guests attended the dance at the Polo Club. 

MR. LATHAM McMULLIN was host to a group of friends at a 
small dinner Monday evening at the Hotel St. Francis, later 
attending the Columbia Theater with his guests. Included 
in bis hospitality were: Mr. and Mrs. Atholl McBean, Mr. 
and Mrs. Augustus Taylor. Mr. and Mrs. Frank King and 
Miss Louise Boyd. 

MR. AND .MRS. NATHANIEL ROBBINS of Piedmont were din- 
ner hosts in the Rose Room at the Palace early in the week, 
assembling a group of friends for dinner and dancing in com- 
pliment to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Edward Oilman, eastern 
visitors. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

GiiO RuhIi Street, Between Powell and Stoekton, Snn FrnnrlNCO 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHEN, Proprietor 



February 23, l'L'4 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



MR. AND MRS. JAMES K. ARMSBY and Mr. and .Mrs. Milton 
Esberg were anions those to entertain informal dinner parties 
on Friday evening, preceding the formal opening of the new 

Community Theater in San Aioelmo. 

MR. AND MRS. STEWART LOWERY will he anions the dinner 
hosts before the hail to he given by about a hundred bache- 
lors on Friday evening, February 39. 

COUNT AND COUNTESS ERIC LEWENHAUPT, who are leaving 
soon for their home in England, were guests of honor for 
whom Dudley Gunn gave a dinner party Wednesday evening. 
DANCES 

MISS HELEN ST. FITZPATRICK. in honor of the Golden Gate 
Park Tennis Club, gave a very enjoyable dansant on Satur- 
day in the Ball Room of Hotel Richelieu. Many tennis cham- 
pions and fully one hundred of Miss Fitzpatrick's friends and 
those of the Club members were present. Refreshments were 
served in Pergola Court. 

MEMBERS OF THE KNIGHTS of Columbus Mardi Gras commit- 
tee voted several hundred dollars in cash prizes to he award- 
ed for both group and individual costumes worn at the 
"Caseys" big function Saturday evening. March 1, in the 
Exposition Auditorium. Societies and clubs entering the 
group division will find several attractive awards awaiting 
the groups voted by the judges as the best appearing on the 
night of the Mardi Gras; and among the individual awards 
will be prizes for the most attractive, original, extreme, pret- 
ty, elaborate and unique costumes worn at the affair. A 
committee of prominent judges will pass on the merits of 
the various costumes entered for prizes, during the grand 
march at the ball. The Mardi Gras celebration will be one 
of a series of events to be given under the auspices of Golden 
Gate and Mission councils, Knights of Columbus, to assist 
in financing proposed clubhouses, athletic plants and com- 
munity centers, under "Casey" direction, in the Park-Pre- 
sidio and Mission districts. 

RECEPTIONS 

CALIFORNIA POETRY CLUB — The World's Art Salon will 
entertain the California Poetry Club at the home of Mrs. 
Geo. McGowan at 2906 Broadway, Tuesday evening, Feb. 
2 6th. Mrs. McGowan, who is president of the World's Art 
Salon, will be hostess of the evening, assisted by Mrs. Gladys 
Wilmot Graham, Mrs. Viola Van Daanlem, Mrs. George Doug- 
las, Mrs. Nell Rothschild, Miss Minnie Granat and Mrs. Dana 
de Hart. An interesting program is promised. 
IN TOWN AND OUT 

MRS. WILLIAM DOHRMANN left recently for Santa Barbara, 
where she will spend the late winter and early spring with 
Mrs. Charles H. Hopkins. Mrs. Hopkins since her return 
south has been at the Samarkand Hotel, where Mrs. Dohr- 
mann has joined her. 

MRS. BOURKE COCKRAN of Washington, D. C, who, as Miss 
Anna Ide, was a frequent visitor in San Francisco, has re- 
cently been enjoying a few days' stay at the Ambassador 
Hotel, in Los Angeles, with Mr. and Mrs. Salisbury Field. 

MRS. ISADORE DOCKWEILER and her daughter. Miss Rosario 
Dockweiler of Los Angeles, who have been here for a fort- 
night or so, have been constantly entertained. They left Tues- 
day for their home. 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM HOUGHTELLING returned Sunday 
to San Francisco from the Atlantic coast, where they were 
called a few weeks ago owing to the death of Mr. Hough- 
telling's mother. 

MRS. U. S. GRANT 111 has returned to her home in Pacific 
avenue after a visit of several weeks on the Atlantic coast. 
Mrs. Grant was called East on account of the illness of her 
father, Mr. Elihu Root of New York. After leaving New 
York Mrs. Grant spent several days in Washington with 
her mother-in-law, Mrs. Frederick Dent Grant. 
MRS. HENRY FOSTER DUTTON and her sister, Mrs. Harry 
Macfarlane. have returned from Coronado where they spent 
several weeks. Mrs. Macfarlane sailed for her home in Hono- 
lulu Wednesday and Mr. and Mrs. Dtttton will leave for the 
East. They will go to New Yerk for a several weeks' stay. 
UK. EDWARD DUPLESSIS BEYLAND lias returned to his home 
in San Mateo after an extended visit in Europe. He arrived 
last week and has reopened his residence in El Camino Real. 
MISS MARIE SPRECKELS recently returned from the Orient 
and is visiting her aunt. Mrs. Alexander Hamilton, al her 
home on Pacifil avenue Later she will so south to visit 
her grandfather, Mr. John D. Spreckels at Coronado. 
MR. AMI MRS. JOSEPH T. GRACE of Santa Rosa sailed Sat- 
urday last on the Kroonland for a trip to Havana. Florida 
and New York. They plan to he away for several weeks. Their 
daughter. Miss Qeraldine Grace, left recently on a pleasure 
trip to Honolulu with a parly of friends. 
MRS, CLEMENT MILLER of Wilmington, Del. is a house guest 
el Hie Willis .1. Walker family al Pebble lteaeh. Mr. and 
Mrs Cecil Fleetwood Shalcross of New York are expected to 
arrive soon lo visit the Walkers. 



MRS. RENNIE 1'. SCHERWIN and Mrs. .lames Shcwan letl lor 
He' south on Thursday, They will motor i" U>s Angeles to 

meel Mr. Richard Schwerin who lias been on a t rip to Panama 

\ilts BEVERLV MacMONAOLE and her sister. Mrs. Frederick 
s. Moody, the latter of whom left tor Paris the early part 
of the year on account of the serious illness of Mrs. Mac- 
Monagie, are new iii Nice, where Mrs. MacMonagie is recup- 
erating from her recent illness. When .Mrs. MacMonagie lias 
sufficiently recovered her health, she and Mrs. Moody will 
make preparations for returning to California and Mrs. Mac- 
Monagie will spend the summer here. 

\li;s. MACONDRAY MOORE, her niece, Miss Inez Macondray, 
and Miss Eleanor Martin will depart this Saturday for the 
East en route to Europe, where they will spend several months 
in travel. Mrs. Moore will stop over in Pasadena for a few 
days' visit with her sister, Mrs. Harry Hunt, and adopted 
daughter. Mrs. Eric Pedley. and will then continue her trip 
East, joining Miss Macondray in New York. They will sail 
March 1 for Europe and plan to return to San Francisco in 
June. 

INTIMATIONS 

MISS PAULINE WHEELER, who is recuperating from a slight 
operation at the Merritt Hospital, in Oakland, is being much 
missed from the social activities of the younger set in San 
Francisco. She is rapidly recovering from the effects of the 
operation. 

MR. AND MRS. ALFRED DE ROPP and Mrs. Sidney Van Wyck 
Peters have motored south and will be among the guests at 
the wedding of Miss Lucy Hanchett and Mr. Vincent K. But- 
ler. Jr., which will take place Saturday in Montecitio. Mr. 
and Mrs. de Ropp will be the guests of her mother, Mrs. 
Horace Davis Pillsbury, during their sojourn in the south. 

MISS JENNIE BLAIR who had contemplated returning to Cali- 
fornia from Europe several weeks ago, has again postponed 
her homecoming on account of the illness of her cousin, Mrs. 
Alexander McCallum. Mrs. McCallum has been ill at one 
of the hospitals in Paris for several weeks, and although 
much improved in health, it will be some time before she 
is able to travel. As soon as her health permits she and Miss 
Blair will go to the Riviera, where they will occupy a villa 
for several weeks. 

MRS. FRANCIS CAROLAN is planning to remain in California 
at Carolands, her home in Burlingame, for several months. 
She is having her house renovated and redecorated and will 
probably be there through the summer. For several years 
Mrs. Carolan has lived in New York. 



FRENCH FETE AT FAIRMONT 

We have been to several elaborate affairs lately, — educational, 
swagger, dramatic and frivolous, but we have yet to experience 
a more delightful afternoon than that which the S. F. Branch 
of the American Pen Women gave at the Fairmont last Tues- 
day in honor of Mrs. Adolph B. Spreckels, donor of the Cali- 
fornia Palace of the Legion of Honor, which will be completed 
the latter part of this year, in Lincoln Park, and which will 
commemorate America's soldier dead. 

Over 500 guests were received and seated at table and were 
entertained throughout the afternoon with a musical program 
and speeches by Count Baronoff of Russia, Col. Chas. E. Stanton, 
Judge John Davis and John Mitchell, of Coronado. presented in 
turn by Mrs. Frederick Colhurn. The predominating colors in 
the exquisite floral decorations were orchid and French pink and 
blue, and the French atmosphere was carried out by Mrs. Spreck- 
els* escort, who were in costume of the period of Louis XVI, 
and conveyed her to her chair (given by the Queen of Roumania I 
as guest of honor. Mrs. Josephine Wilson proved one of the 
charming and well-poised hostesses during her task of receiving 
and seating the hundreds of guests, and the whole affair was en- 
joyable in the extreme. 

Among those who attended as honor guests were: Mr. and 
Mrs. Brobeck. Arthur Chamberlain. M. M. O'Shaughnessy. Judge 
and Mrs. John F. Davis. Mrs. Winfield Davis. Mrs. W. B. Ham- 
ilton, Mr. and Mrs. Alexander de Bretteville. Rev. and Mrs. James 
I. Gordon, Clay Greene, Rev. W. W. Jennings. J. N'ilson 
Laurvik. Judge William P. Lawlor. Mr. and .Mrs. Robert New- 
ton Lynch. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Martin. Mrs. John Dempster 
McKee, Ralph McLaren. Rev. Joseph McQuaide, John Francis 
Neylan, Rabbi NietO, British Consul General Gerald Campbell. 
Edgar Peixotto. Harry Noyes Pratt. Lee Randolph. Mrs. Eleanore 
Ross, Mrs. Edgar Walter. Mrs. Alice Cook and Colonel Charles 
E. Stanton. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 



Telephone Batter C1IO 



Cnder Management CARL 3. STANl^ET 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 23, 1924 






FINANCIAL 



By P. N. BERINGER 

THE Chamber of Commerce has just issued a most com- 
prehensive and valuable book, which gives a vast 
amount of information to the reader. It is called Foreign 
Traders of San Francisco. It is the compilation of A. E. 
Hodgeman, assistant director of the Foreign Trade Bureau. 
The book is priced at two dollars and is fully worth that 
and more. It is being given a very wide circulation. 

* * * 

Telephone Stocks 

There is a rumor that the American Telephone and Tele- 
graph Company is about to put out another issue of stock, 
on account of the increase in business and the necessary 
establishment of new agencies and stations. There is an 
unabated demand for telephone facilities, from all over the 

country. 

* * * 

The Farmer 

We are just now being favored with pleasanter reports 
from the country districts. The farmer has been encour- 
aged by the generous downpour of rain and although many 
section's of the State demand more moisture, it is quite 
evident that that which we have had has changed the out- 
look of the agriculturist from gloom to gladness. We can 
stand eight or ten more inches of rain in many sections. 
We know now that more rice acreage will be planted and 
we are assured that sugar beets will probably see a rec- 
ord season of planting, too, while the hop industry has 
received an impetus it has not had in many years. 

* * * 

Steel and Iron 

Building operations on an unusual scale have gone right 
along, despite the winter season, and there is now an enor- 
mous demand for structural steel and iron. There are many 
new manufacturing plants to be built and 1924 opens as 

a must prosperous vear. 

* * * 

Big Ferry Increase 

Indications of prosperity, either arrived or on the way. 
are always to be found in the reports of an increase of 
travel over any kind of vehicular communication. It is so 
with the ferries and when we realize that the ferries over 
the bay carried 2,780,000 more people in 1923 than they did 
in 1922 we may arrive at a very good reason why the hous- 
ing problem on both sides of the bay has not as yet been 
solved. And we may also safely predict that 1924 will 
beat 1923. in the ferrying of people across the bay. by more 
than 1923 has beaten 1922. 



The Income Tax 

I know that most of my readers are transgressors and 
I am asking them to pardon another reference to the income 
tax and the urgent necessity to act now. You have only 
to March 15th for making your return and now is the time 
to do it. Heavy fines are provided for individuals who wil- 
fully evade making a return or who do not pay the tax 
in time. Failing to make a return may bring you a fine 
of $1000 and a further penalty of 25 per cent of the amount 
of the tax. unless a later return is filed, and it is satisfactor- 
ily shown the delinquency was due to a reasonable cause 
and not to wilful neglect. And there are a number of other 
and awful things which will be done to you, if you are 

heedless, careless, or wilful. 

* * * 

Mining Matters 

Mining has received somewhat of an impetus this year 
through the introduction of new capital. < )ne of the re- 
markable features in mining is that silver mines are report- 
ing a somewhat prosperous business for 1923, when the 

reverse might have been reasonably expected. 

* * * 

Rehabilitation 

It is well to bear in mind that, despite the fact Germany 
has in everv way possible by her actions retarded French 
and Belgian rehabilitation, that these countries have ac- 
complished wonders. At this time, last year, France had 
already rebuilt and rehabilitated about fifty per cent of 
the damage inflicted on her by Germany and she is now 
very quickly approaching a state of complete re-establish- 
ment in the devastated regions. This has made necessary 
the expenditure, by the French, of millions of francs and 
this she has done without the help she should have had 
from Germany. Belgium has quietly done the same thing 
and it is a tribute to the recuperative qualities of both 
nations that this great work has been possible of accom- 
plishment. 

Mexican Rebellion 

V- predicted by the SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LET- 
TER the rebellion in .Mexico has been crushed and all that 
now remains lor ( (bregon to accomplish is to wipe out the 
various centers of revolt here and there and to annihilate 
the remnant rebel army, which is making for the fastnesses 
of Yucatan and other of the most southerly of the states 
of the Mexican republic. San Francisco exporters and im- 
porters should be the first on the ground to establish newer 
and stronger relations with the Mexicans. Mexico may 

now expect a long period of peace. 
* * * 

Germany and Gold 

Before very many weeks the foreign traders of Germany 
will have imposed their will on the government and gold 
will become the standard of value again and. it is to be 
presumed, the paper mark will be repudiated. It may as 
well be. as no one seems to be foolish enough to believe 
the paper mark will ever be redeemed at any value. Ger- 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 1726 San Francisco, Cal. 




Are You 
Particular? 



s^T^ We Offer 

Dining Car Service and Observation 
Cars With Speed and Comfort tor your 
trip to Sacramento and the Sacramento 
Valley. 

For further information call 

San Francisco — Telephone Garfield 64 

Oakland — Telephone Piedmont 345 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R. 

The Scenic Route 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1849-51 Mission St., bet. 9th and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 
Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

We call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 



February 23, l'L'4 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



lb 



many is one of the very few countries that has issued a 
currency which was so cheap it never did paj to counter- 
feit — even in Germany printing costs too much to counter- 
feit a mark. 

* * * 

France and Russia 

Russia owes France millions and. as soon as the Ger- 
man situation has been cleared sufficiently for France to 
give it any attention, you may expect to see Russia sitting 
up and taking notice, because France expects Russia to 
pay Up and. if she shows no disposition to do so. France 
will take a hand to make her do so. 

Mexican Enterprise 

Mexico is wanting' the world merchandisers, of San 
Francisco and the West coast, to realize that it is desirous 
of developing" trade with us. For a long time we have ne- 
glected this trade opportunity, which has been offered by 
Mexico. That country is not waiting for the fires and the 
devastation of a rebellion to thoroughly die down, before 
it is again in the field, through its business agents, urging' 
us to thoroughly understand the feeling which exists in 
the ancient land of the Aztecs. Mr. F. Suastegui, the Com- 
mercial Agent of Mexico, is sending out notices to the 
effect that copies of the government publication "Mexican 
Free Ports" may be had from him, on application. Mr. 
Suastegui is already to answer any questions which busi- 
ness men or others wish to propound and places himself 
and his office at the disposition of the business world. 

* * * 
Exhibit in Japan 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce will exhibit 
in the Toyo Kisen Kaisha building in Tokyo a commer- 
cial exhibit for San Francisco which will cost more than 
a hundred thousand dollars. This is being done under the 
management of Mr. Grady, of the Trade Development De- 
partment of the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. It 
will be one of the units of the International Commercial 

Museum. 

* * * 

Refitting Ships 

It is reported that the Admiral Line will have expended. 
by March 1. in the neighborhood of $100,000 in refitting 
ships, in Tacoma and Seattle. It would not be a bad idea 
for the Admiral, and other lines, having headquarters in 
San Francisco to divide up the trade of refitting ships 
and help crowd the shipyards here with their fleet refittings, 
or with new work. 



FORGOTTEN 

1 have forgotten Pharaoh and the Caesars 
And the black battles that they blundered through, 
Where men gasped out their lives, with stiffened eyelid 
\s men died years ago. forgotten too. 

1 have forgotten ancient martial music 
That summoned youth to blunted faceless years: 
Galloping drums, proud horns and sounding bugles 
Drowning the guns, trench-smells, before-dawn fear-. 

1 have forgotten in this three-filled valley, 
Loud with the rush of wind like surf oil shore. 
How it grows now. rooted in our oblivion, 
Cruel, condign, the cancer men call war. 

— Babette Deutsch, in Poetry. 



II. R. Mariner is the superintendent t>i agencies for Bal- 
four. Guthrie and Co, He will be pleasantly remembered 
as having been in charge for the same company for three 
years of their special risk department. 



it Haaa it h it h h s « it it « it it « Hit it it « so: it :t it it; it it itliittt itit:n:;it it^iiticitiiitlKl! 

j INSURANCE 

u it is it it i: it it :t it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it it [it it it it it it aii 

THE Occidental Life Insurance Company, Los Angeles, 
is reported to have paid two millions of dollars for 
the entire slock of the Great Northern Life Insurance Com- 
pany of ( Irand forks, X. I >. 

* * * 

The dog. in insurance, has come to slay and the idea of 
a rebate, or some kind of valuable recognition of the own- 
ership of a good watchdog, is now applauded where it was 
ridiculed when first introduced as a feature in policies. The 
United States Fidelity ami Guarantee Company were the 
originators of the discount and they have reaped a harvest, 
first of ridicule and later of great praise. The company 
has issued a booklet entitled "The Original Burglar Alarm" 
and this deals with man's best friend, the dog'. 

* * * 

The Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company, in order 
to provide for necessary expansion, has rented the entire 
three upper floors of the new Crocker building, on Market 
street. This is the building being erected between the 
Crocker Bank and the Chronicle building. The business 
of the Pacific Mutual Life has increased very rapidly under 
the guidance of Mr. Arthur C. Parsons and it is said to 
be mainly due to his foresight and business ability the ex- 
pansion of quarters is made necessary. 

* * * 

Robert E. Andrews, assistant chief engineer of the Na- 
tional Board of Fire Underwriters, has graded Honolulu 
and has made an inspection of Hilo. This is the first time 
that Honolulu has been given this attention and Andrews 
made tests of the water systems, fire department and alarm 
systems. 

The Board of Fire Underwriters has just taken action 
in reducing the insurance rates for Watsonville. The re- 
duction was made because of the installation of new eight 
inch water mains and a consequent increase in the water 
supply. The big- canneries and other manufacturing plants 
will benefit by a reduction of twenty per cent. 

The parking of cars, on San Francisco's streets, is be- 
coming so very popular that the fire insurance people will 
soon be forced to take a hand to bring this practice into 
some reasonable limitations. There are auto parks down 
town in the big business districts that might be patronized 
by those who wish to allow their cars to stand for any 
length of time but these individuals always shy at the ex- 
penditure of a single cent while their cars are not in use. 
The parking of cars will, one of these days, cause serious 
losses by fire unless some action is taken. At this time 
every street in the city seems to have its attraction for 
those who wish to leave their cars lying around loose. 
That means that our wide streets are no longer wide, and 
that the moving traffic is impelled to a scry large extent. 

If the public in general were aware of the fact that bet- 
ter roads meant better tire protection, in the country gen- 
erally, there would be an added reason for better roads. 
I'he fact that better roads are a very great addition to the 
efficiency of a fire department escapes most people. Coun- 
try town people complain about the high premiums, paid 
to insurance companies, but they forget that the cure lies 
in efficient and sufficient water supply, in an efficient and 
sufficient lire department, and in roads over which this 
efficient lire department may get to the blaze and use the 
water in an efficient manner. 



16 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 23, 1924 




Pleasure's W^nd 



OBEY 



NO WAND BUT PLEASURE'S 

lorn Moore. 



Columbia 

Like a lifetime of contemplation 
of the "Great Stone Face" molding 
the kindly features of an honest peas- 
ant into a counter-part of that great 
natural edifice, David Warfield's con- 
stant ambition to portray "Shylock" 
has resulted in his giving to the 
world ,- truly great, perhaps the great- 
est, characterization of the "Merchant 
of Venice." 

The culmination of the great ac- 
tor's ambition was the first produc- 
tion of the Shakespearean play in San 
Francisco, the city of Warfield's birth 
and of his first triumph, last Mon- 
day. The reception accorded the new 
"Shylock" by a theaterful of real 
friends of the player, leaves no doubt 
as to the popular acceptance of the 
characterization in the city where 
David Warfield and David Belasco 
must desired its successful reception. 

David Warfield as "Shylock" is pri- 
marily human. He makes no attempt 
to inordinately play to the sympathy 
of his audience or to villify the char- 
acter. Shylock, as Warfield plays 
him, is dignified, well spoken and not 
repressive. It is a beautiful charac- 
terization, marred only by the inad- 
equacy of many of the supporting 
cast. 

The part is played as it was un- 
doubtedly written to be played, free 
from prejudice of any nature. Shy- 
lock, who is neither continually hated 
or pitied by the audience in the great 
Warfield portrayal, is represented 
as a type of his class in whom, over- 
burdened with petty and great in- 
sults, scourging, ostracization and oth- 
er wrongs, there has been created a 
hatred of their persecutors and a not 
altogether unnatural or excessive de- 
sire for retaliation. 

It is not often that any audience, 
in San Francisco or elsewhere, has 
the opportunity to witness such sub- 
limely perfect enunciation, such grace- 
fully expressed gestures, and such 
remarkably understandable expression 
as David Warfield has brought back 
to us again in Shylock. 

At the conclusion of the courtroom 
scene on the opening night. War- 
field, who had already divested him- 
self of makeup and stage garments, 
was forced to appear before the cur- 
tains in a dressing gown and respond 
to the applause of his admirers. 

"The Merchant of Venice," as pre- 
sented at the Columbia now, is pri- 



marily Warfield. David Belasco. mas- 
ter that he is. does not reach the 
heights of his star in the casting 
and production of the play. Portia, 
Mary Servoss, is excellent and car- 
ries much of the burden of the play. 
Percival Vibian, who in addition to 
playing Launcelot Gobbo, the part 
he plays we'l. does the part of a 
Belmont jester, one that he plays in- 
differently. Fuller Mellish, similarly 
endowed with two parts, appears to 
advantage as old Gobbo, and to slight 
advantage as the Doge of Venice. 
With these, all that are commendable 
in the supporting cast have been men- 
tioned. Why Belasco chose to do 
away with the principals who played 
Antonio, Basanio and others a year 
ago at the Lyceum Theater. New 
York, is not known. It was an even 
greater error to fill these principals' 
places with many of those who were 
taking inconsequential and minor roles 
at that time. Basanio, particularly, is 
unprepossessing and Antonio, Gratiano, 
Lorenzo, Xerissa and Jessica are far 
from good. As usual there is a sin- 
gle minor character — this time it is 
Tubal — who is truly terrible. 

The play is not as well set as it 
was in Xew York, which is excuse- 
able, for such scenery as was used 
there, is not transportable. It is won- 
derfully set for a traveling produc- 
tion. But there was little reason for 
cutting the scene of the selection of 
the caskets, a triumph in the Last- 
ern production, and otherwise short- 
ening the play. 

But see the new "Merchant of 
Venice" at any cost. David War- 
field alone, on the bare stage placard- 
ed with signs that once housed the 
original Shakespearean productions, 
would be well worth the time and 
money to witness. His ambition to 
play Shylock is certainly fulfilled, and 
well enough to satisfy a Booth, Bar- 
rett or other renowned Shakespear- 
ean. S.L. 



Curran 

Channing Pollacks' "The Fool," is 
a play that preaches a sermon but 
while preaching that sermon, never 
lets up on interest, the primary func- 
tion of a popular stage presentation. 
Besides the theme of the play which 
presents some genuine dramatic mo- 
ments, the stage settings are almost 
perfect and of course enhance the 
whole show. 



Pollack took ten years to write 
"The Fool." he says, and he has cer- 
tainly accomplished a play which is 
close to a masterpiece. Mitchell Har- 
ris takes the role of Daniel Gilchrist, 
"The Fool," and he fits the part as 
if he really were "The Fool" himself. 
In fact one can't imagine him any- 
thing else in everyday life. He is 
sincere in his part and is popular 
with the audience. 

There is a lame girl in the play who 
is well portrayed by Gay Seabrook. 
( Uher parts are taken by Harry D. 
Southard. Helen Joy, Martin Malloy, 
Henry Hall and Fdwin Redding, all 
of whom are well cast. 

And. no matter what you think of 
the above few words, remember — 
there is a good show waiting for you 
at the Curran. 



Casino 

"Maytime," the latest Hartman- 
Steindorff offering, is a sentimental af- 
fair, with numerous heart songs. It 
abounds in situations of the decay of 
the family tree of the Van Zandts, an 
old Dutch Xew York family. Some- 
thing of the sort was done in the drama 
".Milestones." Colonel Van Zandt. the 
lather of them all, to save his house 
insists that his daughter marry anoth- 
er, and rich. Claud Van Zandt. because 
money with himself is not as plentiful 
as formerly, and a disastrous law-suit 
is impending. The right man is hon- 
est, but poor, but in the years that fol- 
low the generations, and through 
which is presented a kaleidoscopic 
view of Xew York, old and new. the 
tenor-voiced sweetheart becomes pros- 
perous, t though he passes on with 

her who has become aged with him 
and who at one time was his tenderest. 

At the very last their love is sealed 
in their descendants, who sing with 
soulful reminiscence the very song first 
sung by the disappointed lovers in the 
beginning. At a very certain moment 
tin- apple tree in the yard of ancient 
times is about to be chopped down, 
because it is dead like the ancestors of 
disappointed hopes. The symbol, how- 
ever, has worked to its climax, and the 
two fond children of late posterity rush 
to the window and save that tree where 
the former troth was pledged, some- 
where down on Ann street, Greenwich 
Village, Xew York. The play was 
enjoyed thoroughly by the audience. 

Shortly, the Chicago Grand Opera 
Company will be at the Casino Thea- 
ter, with Mine. Elinora Duse playing 
matinees in between. During these en- 
gagements the Hartman-Steindorff 
Comic Opera troups will temporarily 
be on tour. The dramatic stock com- 
pany originally intended for this thea- 
ter will take its stand at the Plaza 
about March 1, and its cast will include 
Belle Bennett, Foster Williams, An- 



February 23, 1924 

cyn McNulty, Nathaniel Anderson and 
others. 



Leon Bakst 

The world's greatest authority on 
Fashions for women, Leon Bakst, will 

lecture at the Plaza Theater on Tues- 
day afternoon and evening, Feb. 26th, 
on the subjects of the Art of Costume 
as applied to the Individual Personal- 
ity, and the New Art in Form and 
Color. The first lecture will be illus- 
trated by lantern slides and by living 
models draped by Mr. Bakst, showing 
the slight and stout women how to 
dress, while the second will handle 
the renaissance of color in art which 
set in after the appearance of Bakst's 
famous designs for the Ballet Russe. 
The prices for these interesting events 
range from $3.00 to $1.00 and tickets 
are for sale at Sherman, Clay & Com- 
pany and at the Plaza Theater. 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 

Hello! Hello!" or "Chera-Bochcha." 

Franker Wood and Bunee Wyde, 
assisted by their company, appear in 
a "Hokumatical Disconnected Trav- 
esty" entitled "All Right Eddy." Janet 
of France, that beautiful young wo- 
man with an abundance of the latest 
Parisian frocks, will appear, with the 
aid of Charles W. I lamp, in a piquant 
musical playlet entitled "A Little 
Touch of Paris." The Five Avalons 
are wizards of the double wires who 
introduce a variety of difficult feats 
at lightning speed. 



At Players Club 

The brilliant days of the Regency in 
England will be re-lived once more at 
the Players Club where "Beau Brum- 
mel" will be produced for eleven per- 
formances beginning Monday evening, 
March 3rd, vtnder the able direction of 
Everett Glass. Benjamin A. Purring- 
ton, President of the Club, and one of 
the most popular of the Players is to 
be the "Beau," and indeed he will be 
an ideal one. Among others in the cast 
are Guy B. Kibbee, Nelson McGee, J. 
Wheaton Chambers, Hobart Melvin 
Furman, Carl Kroenke, — recently re- 
turned from Hollywood after a long 
sojourn there, — Arthur Pierson, Barry 
Hopkins, Joseph Carson Sturgis, W. 
C. Johnson, Gus H. Alber, William 
Rice, Rosetta Baker, Helen Saunders, 
Atha Hillback, Martha McAnear, 
Laura Jane Heller and Florence Gard- 
ner. 



Orpheum 

The Orpheum Theater will offer an 
entire new bill of features for the 
week beginning with the matinee 
Sunday. This bill will be one of 
the greatest variety offerings of the 
season. 

Charles "Chic" Sale, that well- 
known Protean actor, will appear in 
rural character studies taken from real 
life. Another attraction will be The 
Cansinos, a quartet of nimble Spanish 
Dancers who have created nothing- 
less than a furore throughout the 
tour of the Orpheum Circuit. 

The entire bill is full oi feature acts 
and includes such celebrities as Geo. 
MacFarlane. the baritone, who with 
the assistance of Margaret Walker, 
a clever dancer, and Herbert S. Lowe, 
accompanist, will present "Song Fan- 
tasies"; Sam Lewis and Sam Di 
comedians of the first water, will offer 
their laugh-provokine; comedy" Hello! 



Last S. F. Symphony 

The final popular concert of the Mu- 
nicipal series of the San Francisco Or- 
chestra will be given in the Exposition 
Auditorium Tuesday, March 11, at 
8:15 p. m. Alfred Hertz as usual will 
conduct the famed orchestra and Jean 
Gerardy of Belgium will be the guest 
'cellist artist. Supervisor J. Emmet 
Hayden of the Auditorium committee 
announces the same popular prices will 
prevail thus enabling everyone to en- 
joy these feature concerts. The visit- 
ing Belgian artist, Jean Gerardy, is in- 
ternationally famed and has been on 
the concert platform since boyhood. 
In 1888 he was proclaimed a boy prod- 
igy and two years later appeared with 
Paderewski and Ysaye in London in 
concert. Since then his successes have 
been continuous and phenominal. His 
war record is brilliant, and after serv- 
ing three years at the front with the 
Belgian Army was relieved of duty 
at the request of the Belgian Queen 
to appear in concert for the benefit of 
the Red Cross organizations of all the 
Allies. 



The Strand 

Anita Stewart, starring in "The 
Great White Way," begins today at 
the Strand. This is a spectacular 
and wonderful characterization of this 
fascinating highway of New York, 
at extremely low prices. The Strand's 
orchestra is always good, and this 
theater offers some of the best plays 
at lower prices than any other thea- 
ter in San Francisco. 



Cameo 

"The Whispered Name." adapted 
for the films from the play by Rita 
Weiman, and starring Ruth Clifford 
and Niles Welch, will be the feature 
at the Cameo, beginning today. There 
will also be "Round 4. of the 4th 
Series of Leather Pushers." and the 
usual International News film. The 
News Letter has remarked before up- 
on the unusual courtesy of all the 
officials connected with this prettv 
little theater on Market Street, and 
we want to reiterate this praise, for 
courtesy seems a lacking attribute. 
quite often, relative to theaters and 



17 



box offices. The Cameo plays are al- 
ways entertaining, and its orchestra 

is an important adjunct, making an 
appeal to lovers of good music, lor 
jazz is often conspicuous by its ab- 
sence, and the classical compositions 
take its place, 

Warfield 

The Saturday matinee brings to the 
Warfield Theater the most important 
picture engagement in the history of 
that theater— the Louis B. Mayer 
presentation of the Fred Niblo pro- 
duction of "Thy Name Is Woman." 
Originally written as a stage play by 
Karl Shoenherr and an international 
stage success, "Thy Name Is Wo- 
man" was produced by William A. 
Brady in New York with Marv Nash 
in the title role and with Holbrook 
Blinn chief in her support. The story 
concerns a young soldier, daring and 
reckless, who is sent by his command- 
ing officer to the cabin of Pedro, the 
smuggler, to spy upon the man and 
to make love to the woman so that 
she will betray her husband, The 
woman seeks to ensnare the boy and 
is herself ensnared. The management 
of the Warfield look upon "Thy Name 
Is Woman" as their greatest event 
since the building of the theater. In 
the cast supporting Miss La Marr and 
Mr. Navarro are Robert Edeson, Wil- 
liam Mong, Edith Roberts and Wal- 
lace MacDonald with Clair McDowell. 
On the stage will be the Fanchon 
and Marco "Ideas," with Aileen Stan- 
ley making her final appearance and 
the Lipschultz Warfield Music Mas- 
ters. 




ABUNDANT 
WATER FOR T( 
EVERY NEED "V 

Are you risking your crops, may- 
be your entire fortune, on the un- 
certainties of a surface watei 

Ply? 

Don't do it: With a sturdy, depend- 
able i 'i :i' 'i-: pump the pure waters 

under the earth are yours in abun- 
dance, day and night, winter and 
summer. 

Keep your crops nourished, strength- 
ened and revitalized through efficient 

irrigation. PRICE pumps on your 

fl ■■■■ ill pa ■■■■ Cor themselves m;iny 

times over in increased crops. Send 
for catalog. 

G. W. PRICE 
PUMP & ENGINE CO. 

Mumifiirt tirers 

Members Weslern I rri ir;> t imi Equip- 
ment. Assn. 

L3S0 FoUom St 
SAN FK INCISCO 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



February 23, 1924 




TFIE sensational features of the Au- 
tomobile Show that have attracted 
thousands daily to the Exposition Au- 
ditorium are the new l'»24 models of 
the motor car industry, the subject of 
brakes, which is warmly discussed in 
nearly every exhibit and the balloon 
tire equipment which features cars in 
most of the exhibits. 

There is a wide divergence oi opin- 
ion among' the automobile men on the 
subject of front wheel brakes and the 
public at the show has been given an 
excellent opportunity to see and com- 
pare the new models equipped with 
the various types of brakes. 

On balloon tire equipment however 
there is nearer a unanimity of opinion. 
Most of the exhibitors have taken ad- 
vantage of the balloon tire publicity 
to equip at least one of their cars with 
the fat tires and nearly all the sales- 
men and the executives are extolling 
the advantages of the big tires. 

Some of the manufacturers are mak- 
ing a special play to the public on the 
fact that the new models offered by 
them this year are fully equipped and 
that there is nothing further to be 
spent on them in the way of added 
appointments. This feature is one that 
seems to find favor with the daily 
show crowds as can be judged by the 
numbers of people flocking to these 
special displays. 

California tops are displayed to good 
advantage in the exhibits and the mo- 
tor truck and accessory display drew 
much favorable comment from the 
show crowds. There is much that is 
new and interesting in both of these 
exhibits and the public found them 
both educational and interesting. The 
exhibitors expressed their enthusiasm 
over the interest shown by the public 
and the visiting dealers and it was 
freely prophesied that the business 
transacted during this show would ex- 
ceed anything heretofore recorded at 
any previous motor display. 

The attendance at the show this year 
broke all past records, a fact that is 
taken by automobile men to mean that 
the year holds a prosperous future for 
the automotive trade. Of course the 
magnificent decorative effects achieved 
by -Manager Wahlgreen and his staff of 
artists continue to amaze prominent 
eastern automobile men who declare 
that it is easily the most beautiful au- 
tomobile -how ever held in America. 



trations become delinquent at midnight 
March 1. 

"Although over 20,000 members of 
the California State Automobile Asso- 
ciation have secured their plates to 
date, the percentage with the general 
public has been somewhat lower," Geo. 
S. Grant, manager of the Automobile 
Club's touring bureau, announced yes- 
terday. "A last minute rush to secure 
plates through the Division of Motor 
Vehicles seems inevitable. 

"Members of the Automobile Club 
are more fortunate," Grant said, "for 
they may apply at the Automobile As- 
sociation offices in 20 different cities 
and receive their plates without stand- 
ing in line or bothering with trouble- 
some correspi mdence." 

The importance of safeguarding the 
certificate of legal ownership which will 
be issued this year by the Division of 
Motor Vehicles was emphasized by 
Grant. Two certificates will be issued 
this year, one showing the registered 
ownership of the car and the other the 
legal ownership. 

"Your strong box or safety deposit 
vault is the place for the certificate of 
legal ownership," Grant said. "It is 
necessary to produce it before any 
transfer of title in the car can be made. 
In case it is lost the Division of Motor 
vehicles will require that a surety bond 
covering the present value of the car 
be posted for the remainder of the vear 
before a duplicate will be issued. The 
certificate of registered ownership 
should be placed as usual in the con- 
tainer of the car." 



Re-Register Your Car 

AUTOMOBILE owners have just 
six more business davs in which 
to get their green and white 1924 reg- 
istration plates before renewal reffis- 



New Quarters for Two Association 
Branches 

Better facilities for serving tourists 
over the Redwood Highway and mo- 
torists in the vicinity of Eureka are 
being provided by the California State 
Automobile Association. Construction 
work was started in Eureka last week 
on a new building of the standard 
architectural type adopted for Asso- 
ciation buildings. 

The new Eureka home of the Auto- 
mobile Association will he located on 
Fourth street near G street, the main 
highway route through the city. It is 
being erected by Daly Bros., owners 
of the property. 

New quarters are also being provid- 
ed lor the Association branch at Sa- 
linas. Alterations are now being made 
lor an office in the Masonic Building, 
334 Main street, in that city. The new 
Salinas office will be occupied on 
March 1. The Eureka office will be oc- 
cupied on .\|;,y 15, j„ t ; llle l(> serve 

tourist travel over the Redwood High- 
way. 

Both of the new locations provide 
specialized facilities for Automobile 

( bill activities, and are equipped with 
resl rooms for the convenience of the 
motoring public. 



There was a banker who owned a 
tanker 
And used it for a yacht. 
He liked this tanker, did that old 
banker, 
Because it held a lot. 

"A sloop fails sooner than does a 
schooner." 
The old tar used to say. 
"But I hoist my spanker aboard a 
tanker 
When going down the bay." 

— Win. S. Adkins, in "Judge." 

NOTICE (IF ANNUAL MEETING 

Notice is hereby given that the annual meet- 
ing of the stockholders of Rosebrand Petroleum 
Company, a California Corporation, will be held 
ii i in Company's office in room 704. Clunie 
Building, «.i,iner California and Montgomery 
streets, in the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, California, on Tuesday, February 20, 1924, 
at 2 o'clock I'. -M.. for the purpose of electing 
directors for the vear ensuing and for the traus- 
action of such other business as may properly 
come before the meeting. 

A. MILLER, Secretary. 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Instate of James Wheeler Riley, deceased, No. 
::s I l'o. Dept No. lo. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
w. J. ii vn.s administrator of the estate of 
.lames Wheeler Riley, deceased, to the creditors 
of and all persons having claims against the said 
a. red. ■nl, to tile them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within four ft) months after the first pub- 
lication of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
of the Superior Court of the State of California, 
in anil for the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, <-r lo exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within four <u months after the first 
publiealii.ii of this notice to the said adminis- 
trator, a l his office, Si»s Phelan Building. San 
Francisco, California, which said last-named of- 
fice the undersigned selects as his place of busi- 
ness in all matters connected with said estate of 
.lames Wheeler Riley, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES. 
Administrator of the estate of 
James Wheeler Riley, deceased. 
Dated, San Francisco, California, January 22nd, 

11121. 
ci -Li. ix \x .V: KICKEY, 

Attorneys for Administrator. 5t 

NOTICE TO CREDITORS 

Kslate of August Bod, deceased, No. 38110. 
Dept Xo. in. 

Notice is hereby given by the undersigned, 
W. J. Ilyn.-s. administrator of the estate of 
August Bod, deceased, to the creditors of and 
:.n persons having claims against the said 
decedent, t<> file them with the necessary vouch- 
ers within l,,iir ill months after the first pub- 
ii. it inn of this notice, in the office of the Clerk 
of the Superior Court ,,f the State of California, 
In and tor the City ami County of San Fran- 
cis, ii, or to exhibit them with the necessary 
vouchers within four (4) months after the first 
publication of this notice to the said admlnis- 

ii'i ', nt his office, sr.s Phelan Building, San 

Francisco. California, which said last-named of- 
fice tile undersigned selects as his place of busi- 
ness in all matters connected with said estate of 
August Bod, deceased. 

W. J. HYNES, 
Administrator of the estate of 
August Bod. deceased, 
Oated. San Francisco, California, January 22nd, 

1924. 
CCLLIXAX .V: HICKEY, 

Attorneys for Administrator. 5t 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 

The MINERAL DEVELOPMENT COMPANY. 
location of principal place of business. San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Notice is hereby given that at a regular nieet- 
ing "I' Hi.- Directors held on the 5th day of 
February, 1924, an assessment of one cent per 
share was levied upon the issued capita! stmk 
of the cor], oration, payable immediately in legal 

; " I "f the United States, to the Secretary. 

at the otiice of the company, room 237 Monad- 
nock Building, San Francisco, California. 

Any stock on which this assessment shall re- 
main unpaid on the 14th dav of March. 1924. 
will I"- delinquent and advertised for sale at 
nil" auction, and unless payment is made be- 
fore will v.,- sold on Thursday the lnth day of 
April, llij). to pay the delinquent assessment, 
together with costs of advertising and expense 
of sale. 

... „ , , -M. J- SEELY, Secretary. 

-... Monadnock Building. San Fran, i 'ali- 

fornla. 



Carl Leonhardt, formerly of Golden 
Gate Park Casino 

Uncle Tom's Cabin 

Restaurant and Cafe 

Open 8 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 
Popular Prices 

Tel. San Bruno 1 16 San Bruno, Cal. 



C. LALANNB 



J. BARRERI 



Old Poodle Dog 




RESTAURANT AND 
GRILL 

35 New Montgomery St. 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

(Formerly 

BERGEZ FRANK'S 

OLD POODLE DOG, 

415-427 Bush St.) 
Telephone Sutter 8668 

Announcement 

A $1.25 French Dinner 

Served Daily Except 

Sunday From 5 p. m, 

to 9 p. ni. 

Also A La Carte 



Open Every Day from 8 a. m. to 9 p. m. 

GUS' FASHION 

The Most Popular Restaurant 

In San Francisco 

05 Tost Street, Near Market Street 

I'hone Kearny 4586 

Try Our Special Sunday Dinners 
$1.25 

Mull Served a la 'Carte. Also Regular 
Frenoll and Italian Dinners 

FISH AND GAME A SPECIALTY 



BLANCO'S 

O'Farrell and Larkin Streets 

Phone Franklin 9 

No visitor should leave the city with- 
out dining in the finest cafe 
in America 
Luncheon (11:30 to 2 p. m.).. 75c 

Dinner, Week Days $1.50 

Dinner, Sundays and Holidays. .$1.75 



Herbert's Bachelor Grill 

Enlarged and Improved 

"Halt Dollar" Specials 
for the Busy Man . 
151 Powell Street 



W. W. HEALEY 

Notary Public 
Insurance Broker 

208 CROCKER BUILDING 

Opposite Palace Hotel 
Phone Kearny 301 San Francisco 




CYCOL 

MOTOR. OIL 



ifje 

MOTOR OIL 

FREE FROM 

DESTRUCTIVE 

"SULPHO" 
COMPOUNDS 

Produced under 
thenewHEXEON ' 
process. , 



ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO 




A Guaranteed Paint Job! 

After an exhaustive search and a series 
of experiments covering a period of years 
we are now offering the Motoring public 
an Enameled paint jot guaranteed for 
two years. Surface may be cleaned with 
coal oil, or gasoline, or may be scrubbed 
with a brush, Your investigation is in- 
vited, or may we have our representative 
call? 

California Simonizing & Painting Co. 

1656 CALIFORNIA STREET 
Prospect .1418 -Phones- Prospect 34 \9 

WHAT REST SERVES THE PUBLIC 
REST SERVE** ITS 



Tel. Franklin 3685 




Auto Fender & Radiator Works 

Metal Work Appertaining to Automobiles 

Oxy-Acetylene Welding — Hlacksmlthtng 

II. W. Culver M. Daherer E. Johnwon 



riione Garfield 302C Palmer Graduate 

Hours 10 to 1 and 2 to 6 

DR. W. N. CLAYTON 

Chiropractor 

Western States Life Building 
995 Market Street San Francisco 



GANTNER & MAISON 
FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

Chapel — 771 to 777 Valencia Street 

Bet. ISth and 19th Sts. 

Telephone Market 64 San Francisco 



CHAS. J. EVANS 

Palace Garage 

Opposite Palace Hotel 

HAVE YOUR CARS WASHED 
and GREASED 

"THE PALACE WAY" 

Rates, '!■"»' per day: 7.50 per month 

PHONE DOUGLAS 2 4 3 

Siv Floors for Service and Storage 

of Automobiles 




N. W. CORNER 

POLK and POST STS. 



YOU CAN 

LOOK YOUR BEST 

IF YOU HAVE A 

Permanent Wave 

AT 

Cosgrove's Hair Store 

360 Geary Street 

San Francisco 

Est. 28 Years Kearny 2842 

Berkeley Shope, 2331 Telegraph Ave. 

MR. and MRS. A. F. COSGROVE 



Be photographed this year on your 
Birthday 




Studios In all Principal Cities of California 
Oakland San Francisco 

408 14th St. 41 Grant Ave. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

DENTIST 
PYORRHEA A SPECIALTY 

Offices 505-507 323 Geary St. 

Phone Douglas 2433 

Parisian Dyeing and Cleaning 

El lilt* Pre-^.l by Hand, Only — 
Suit* Called for and Delivered 

MME. M. S. E. LEE 

I'itri-itin Dyeing and Cleaning 
433 Mason St. Phone Franklin 2510 



INSIST ON 

ALEMITE lubricant 



PURE SOLIDIFIED OIL 




At All Dealers and Service Stations 



oAll the latest in ZMotor Cars, 
oAccessories, California Tops, etc. 

EIGHTH ANNUAL 

Pacific 
Auto Show 



EXPOSITION ^AUDITORIUM, SAN FRANCISCO 

FEBRUARY 16 to 23, Inc. 



Spend Your Vacation 
on the Russian River 

The 

Monte Rio 
Hotel 

Remodeled-Enlarged-Beautified 

100 Rooms with Hot and Cold 

Water. 
50 Rooms with Private Bath. 
Electric Elevator Service. 
Modern GRILL on Main Floor. 

Now Open 

NEAREST HOTEL TO STATION 
— dancing every evening; swimming 
and other amusements. OFFICIAL 
A. A. A. HOTEL. Rates, American 
plan, $4 per day and up. Special 
Weekly Rates. 

GEORGE H. CARR, Proprietor. 

Make Reservations in Advance 

See Perk Judah or Crabtroes 

RUSSIAN RIVER 

California's Vacation Land 




Dinner Dansant 

Dathj except Sunday 
frim 6 to <3 J 

£ddfe Y 

Hardness 

and his Orchestra 
excellent: 7Cburse Dinner 
$125 



HotelPlaia 

POST AT STOCKTON 



Established July 20, I860 




PRICE 10 CENTS $5.00 PER YEAR 

California Advertiser 




SATURI 




TO HOLD, AST WERE, THE MIRROR UP TO NATURE." 




T*ick youp 

Program atwii 

with 



>/%S : $■ '^-- 



J > RADIO 
RECEIVER 



A demonstration will prove a rev- 
elation to you. At the best radio 
dealers. 



YRYEL of the age is Ra- 
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compare, thrills and 
laughter, facts and fun 
without end, and all for you to en- 
joy NOW, enjoy COMPLETELY, 
enjoy in the peace and comfort of 
your own home — with RADYNE. 
Tuning in your favorite program 
with RADYNE is simple as setting 
your -watch. Almost uncanny its 
ability to reach distant stations, se- 
lect for separate enjoyment each 
you choose to hear, and render each 
so realistically you seem to be in 
the very presence of the entertain- 
ers. By noting on a card that comes 
with the RADYNE for that pur- 
pose, the dial readings of the va- 
rious stations as you receive them, 
you can get those stations again 
any time you want them by simply 
turning the dials to the reading 
shown on the card. This makes it 
easy to bring in programs in rapid 
succession and locate quickly just 
the kind of entertainment that most 
suits your fancy at any time. 
Opera, market reports, sandman 
stories, tested recipes, baseball 
scores, oratory, prize fight returns, 
weather forecasts, symphony or- 
chestra, jazz dance music, drama, 
comedy, minstrelsey and song. &- 
Icct your program at will with 
RADYNE. At the best radio deal- 
ers. 

R.jDYXE Radio Receiver in solid mahogany 

cabinet, without accessories, $130 

lit walnut cabinet without accessories, $140 

II illi loop antenna, $10 extra 

Manufactured by 
THE GREAT WESTERN RADIO CORPORATION 

San Francisco. California 

ATLANTIC-PACIFIC AG EN< !IES I '< IRPORATION 

Rialto Building". San Francisco, California 

MANUFACTURER'S SOLE AGENTS 





EiUMUhcd July 20. 1M6 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast 




Vol. CIV 



SAX FRANCISCO, CALIF., SATURDAY, MARCH 1. 1<>24 



No. 9 



THE SAX FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. 
Frederick Marriott, Russ Building. 235 Montgomery Street. San Francisco. 
Calif. '111. phone Douglas GS53. Entered at San Francisco, Calif., Post 
Office .is second-class matter. 

London mlice: Street & Co.. 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. 

Subscription Rates (including postage): One year $5.00. Foreign, one 
year. $6.00 ; Canada, one year. $6.00. 



— ( hie object of social 
feed the neighbors. 



life, as some people see it. is tt 



— "Laugh and the world laughs with you!" That is cer- 
tainly more satisfactory than having it laugh at us! 

— Carpers at the present styles, should stud)' the fash- 
ions of the '40's; especially those of an amorous tempera- 
ment. How did the young folks of those days, manage 
propinquity? 

— What's the matter with the Johnsons? Magnus isn't 
muck-raking, and Hiram is becoming almost as quiet as 
"Pussyfoot" of Prohibition ill-fame. 

— There are a lot of "d-s" mixed up in this Teapot D-ome 
business: Doheny, Daugherty, Denby, and Denby's pos- 
sible successor, — Davidson or Dixon. And the old pot is 

still boiling like the d-d-d-devil ! 

* * * 

— "We are clearly entering upon a new age. We are 
now aware that mere finely-conceived constitutions do not 
constitute the body of liberty, that the body of liberty can 
be had only by the use of institutions to serve the per- 
manent need of the rank and file of men." — From Presi- 
dent Wilson's Speech on taking Office. 

* * * 

— The Swiss Navy joke is now passe. The Swiss gov- 
ernment is actually creating a harbor at Vado and intends 
to make Switzerland a maritime nation. Perhaps a pro- 
gressive Swiss has visited Southern California at one time 
or another, seen "Los Angeles Harbor," and decided that 
"there ain't nuthin' impossible," as the boy said when his 
father forgot and gave him a quarter. 

— A smartly dressed couple were walking up Russian 
Hill, in a quite "respectable" neighborhood, the man car- 
rying a large suit case. They slopped before a flat occupied 
by an Italian family. "Is this the joint?" asked the woman. 
"Sh — sh" answered the man. Whereupon we suddenly re- 
membered the truck load of empty barrels that had been 
unloaded and carried into the depths of the basement last 
\uuunn. 

* * * 

— Now that work appears to be speeding up on the Sky- 
line Boulevard, let us see to it. as lovers "i the beautiful, 
that trees are planted along this wonderful highway, in- 
stead of billboards. And let us see to it, also, that the 
trees tit the\ are to line this road) conform to the adjacent 
scenery, and not mix palms with pines, or Lombard) pop- 
lars with California madrones, 



— Out of the hunch of Oakland firemen thirty five walked 
up and volunteered to submit to blood transfusion for a 
fifteen year old boy whom they had never seen. That is a 
fine thing to have done. Among all the pettinesses of life, 
things like that stand out and give us a greater confidence 
in man, — that is to say, in our own selves. 

— Any attempt at making political capital out of the 
Teapot Dome mess is foolish. People who have speculated 
in oil stocks are not naturally and logically thieves, and 
investigation shows that Doheny has never been suspected 
of doing things in a crooked way before. Until something 
more substantial is shown than has been thus far proven, 

it is wrong to assume him guilt}' of anything criminal. 

* * * 

— Have you ever strolled up Polk Street, where you can 
purchase anything from a meat chopper to an opera cloak, 
just at dusk on a Saturday night? When the afterglow 
is dying out over the Clay Street hill, and the lamps are 
flushing into bloom. Here come whole families, taking up 
the sidewalk, five abreast, or some callow youth with his 
little "fizgig," chattering, flirting, "making eves;" or a mid- 
dle aged, or ancient man and wife, whose children, you feel, 
are all married off, and who are again, as absorbed in each 
other, perhaps, as in the days of their honeymoon. It is 
a homey street, — this highway that runs from Market to 
the blue bay, — more like the Main Street of some small 
town, than the artery in a big city. And it is a street full 
of the memories of the immortal Frank Norris, and his 

wierd and wonderful "McTeague." 

* * ' * 

— "Some men are by nature beavers, and some are rats. 
The people who came to this country in the early days 
were of the beaver type. They built up America because 
it was in their nature to build. Then the rat people be- 
gan coming here to house under the roof that others had 
erected. And they try to undermine and destroy it because 
it is in their nature to destroy. A civilization rises when 
the beaver-men outnumber the rat-men. When the rat- 
men get the upper hand, the civilization falls. Then the 
rats turn and eat one another, and that is the end. Beware 
of breeding rats in America!" — Secretary of Labour, fames 

J. Davis. 

* * * 

— We are wondering why the Literary Digest has ap- 
pointed itself the medium through which Congress will 
discover (from a secret vote) the "wishes of the people" 
in regard to the tax reduction proposed by Mellon. We 
mean, of course, aside from the \ erv good advertisin 
vantages to be gained by its broadcasting the ballot for 
this straw vote. This reduction practically cuts individual 
taxes almost in two, but it also cuts the soldier bonus out 
completely. Strange how we can always find the where- 
withal to pay for amunition for the abattoir, but when it 
comes to paying a man for his body land often for his 
mind and soul I we suddenly become very economical. 
However, we have to hand it to the Digest for its clever 
publicity, and to Mellon for his clever scheme. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 1, 1924 




a community it is the attitude of that Community to the 
poor and destitute. The public wants their poor well- 
treated and pays money for that purpose. The politician 
wastes the money and scamps the work. And this is al- 
ways the case where the public tries to accomplish work 
through the medium of political action. 



A few weeks ago we printed an 
Regulation of Gasoline editorial in connection with the 
public regulation of gasoline, 
pointing out that unless something were done about it the 
public would be mulcted heavily in the price of this ar- 
ticle, which has now become a public utility. Our stand 
in that matter has received very strong confirmation from 
the reports incidental to the fight between Standard Oil 
and the State of South Dakota. It appears that the state- 
named started a gasoline fight by going into the gasoline 
business and cut the price from 26 to 6 cents in the course 
of the struggle. The fight, it is calculated, resulted in a 
saving to the public in Dakota and the neighboring states 
of $150,000,000 in seven months. But now the tide has 
turned. Standard is winning out because the corporation 
has managed to corner the crude oil market and the prices 
rose from 6'-< cents to 1SJ4 cents a gallon in three weeks. 
notwithstanding the great amount of oil in stock in the 
country. The governor of South Dakota says to the Pres- 
ident. "In view of the oil scandals. . . .shall not the federal 
government now take decisive steps to control the price of 
gasoline?" 

Apart altogether from the oil scandal, between which 
and the price of gasoline we can see no logical connection, 
is the governor of South Dakota not on the right track 
when he insists that the federal government should have 
something to say about the price of an article which is of 
such tremendous value, nay. which has become a primary 
necessity to the public? 'We are no enthusiasts for the in- 
terference of the state in matters of industry or commerce, 
but experience has shown that in certain cases where the 
public interests are intimately and necessarily involved, 
such as gas, water, electricity, etc., the state has had to 
be made a necessary party to the contracts between the 
owners of these utilities and the individual consumer, oth- 
erwise, human nature being what it is, we should be large- 
ly unwashed and unlighted. 



If private corporations were to con- 
Poverty and Society duct their business and carry on their 
welfare work with the same degree of 
incompetency, with which the public institutions, whose 
business is the prosecution of such efforts do, the welkin 
would ring with the accusations of the muck-rakers. James 
J. Davis. Secretary of Labor, reports for example, that the 
poor farms and orphan asylums of the country are "revolt- 
ing and a scandal to the nation." There has been recently 
a survey made by the Department of Labor resulting in 
the report that these places are "a century behind the 
times" and "monuments of waste and places of filth, cruel 
inhumanity and horror." The report says that "unspeak- 
able suffering has been disclosed." 

We are not calling attention to this for sensational pur- 
poses, but, merely, to show the fallacy that underlies the 
popular conception that work done by the public officials 
is necessarily good work. Some people make the propa- 
ganda that, because the public has its interest in things 
being well done, the public can do these things better than 
private individuals or responsible corporations. The results 
are against any such contention. As a matter of fact, what 
is the public's business is nobody's business, and very soon 
a group of lazy politicians graft on the public work and it 
is either undone or scandalously mismanaged. If there is 
one thing more than another by which we are to judge 



Now Reno has a competitor and the power 
Paris or Reno? of that competitor has been growing from 

day to day, at the expense, it is to be pre- 
sumed, of Reno. A recent decision, as a result of an in- 
vestigation set on foot by the French Minister of Justice. 
has re-established the position of Paris as an administra- 
tor of matrimonial justice. There have been charges that 
divorces were too easily obtained by Americans in Paris. 
There have been general intimations that the gaiety, which 
the foreigner invariably and incurably associates with that 
capital, had invaded the precincts of the courts and the god- 
dess of justice, as it were, performed a sort of merry dance. 
before dissolving the ties which had been tied in our own 
land. It was said that American couples went to Paris, 
or one party to the matrimonial team did. and the decree 
of divorce was obtained more quickly and more satisfac- 
torily than could be done even in Reno. Be that as it may, 
some American attorneys at least betook themselves to 
the French capital and there made money and lived happy 
lives. The Ministry of Foreign affairs, being, probably, 
afraid that French barristers were not getting enough out 
of it. commented adversely on the crop of American di- 
vorces in the French courts. The Ministry of Justice, hav- 
ing assured itself that there is a fair division in fees be- 
tween the American and the French lawyers, is satisfied. 
Meanwhile, it does not look very promising for Reno. Life, 
even in Paris, is as cheap as life in Reno, and more satis- 
fying. For a rich American, Paris seems to be the more 
attractive place, even for purposes of divorce. 



The noisy crowd of claccpiers 
The Power Bond Drive who have been pushing the prop- 
aganda for the municipal distri- 
bution of the Ketch Hetchy power seem to have ultimately 
won over the common sense of the Mayor, who has yielded 
to the popular clamor in the matter and gone over to the 
ranks of the public distributors. The press, in reporting 
the matter, says that the attitude of the mayor struck "dis- 
may into the ranks of the opposing supervisors." No doubt 
it did; somersaults of the character of those indulged in 
by the mayor, would strike dismay or something else into 
anybody. But the method of steam rollering the opposi- 
tion in this way is not ethical and it certainly does not 
savor of that fair play, which must be maintained, if the 
system of democratic government is to survive and the 
lynching method to be kept down. The people pushing 
the movement for distribution are calling for a very earlv 
bond election, in May. rather than in August, or Septem- 
ber. We are glad to see that the Mayor takes a stand 
against that hurried policy and will not take a vacation un- 
less there is an agreement that nothing will be done in his 
absence and that the matter should have full ventilation 
and discussion. This is all the more necessary in that the 
press has so rapidly taken up the idea of public distribu- 
tion, that there is no guaranty of any proper discussion 
of the question, such as is necessary in a matter of im- 
portance, which impinges on the public at so many points. 
The representative of Los Angeles, who was present at 
the discussion, seems to be very satisfied with the results 
of municipal distribution there, but everybody from [„os 
Angeles is invariably satisfied with everything in Los An- 
geles, so that we arc not helped much by his approval. 
The matter is by no means easy to decide. There is so 
much to be said in favor of corporation efficiency and so 
little to be said for public honesty and efficiency. 



March 1. 1024 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 




"K" 11 "" 



Wheat and Chaff 

By Nathaniel Anderson 



MG. is thirsting for the salty air again. He is a foreman 
e electrician at present, while Mine. M. G. holds the 
same position in a candy shop. Perhaps some nation will 
give him a position above able-bodied seaman. Hut to whom 
it may concern, here is his recommendation, also the rea- 
sons why lie started here as a skilled electrician and his 
wife as a factory girl: 

Commander of a battleship for the Tsar of Russia and 
in charge of coast defense northern part of that country. 
Immediately after the revolution Provisional government 
offered him command of all Russia's navy, hut he had sworn 
his oath to the Tsar, and wanted to get away if he could. 
According to information that comes with this story, the 
Tsar was persuaded, not forced, into abdication on a plea 
that it was for the best interest of his country. To return 
to M. G., he excused himself out of all offers of the Pro- 
visional government until it made him emissary to America 
for ships and supplies. 

He succeeded in equipping a cruiser with guns and ma- 
terial and intended to bring it to the Whites, who were 
now. to his thinking, the most legitimate forces in Russia, 
the Bolsheviks meanwhile having secured control at Pet- 
ersbourg. It was at Halifax harbor where he found his 
crew were Bolshevised. They refused to go by way of 
Siberia; in fact, they didn't want to go anywhere. M. G. 
turned the guns of the ship on them. The} - ran below, but 
in about a half hour fire shot up from the hold ; the crew 
had opened up the fuel oil tank and were now jumping 
through the port holes, swimming for the shore. The fire 
was quickly put out. and the commander and those 
loyal to him rowed ashore. 

Hut the big boat had caught enough water to sink it, 
and so it was four months' work for M. G. to get it up 
again, which he did with his personal labor and that of 
three or four others, saving for some government about 
$100,000 in salvage service. He sold ship and contents for 
$85,000, and gave the money to a man by the name of 
Bachmetief, the same as that of the old Russian Ambas- 
sador, but who was not he. This new Bachmetief was soon 
building apartment houses in New York. 

M. G. was next heard of in San Francisco, wdiere he 
fitted up another ship with money sent him by the Whites. 
He intended his for Siberia; also to help General Kalchak 
with the supplies, who was doing much damage to the 
Bolsheviks there. By the way. it is mentioned that Gen- 
eral Kalchak did not kill off his prisoners, but sent them 
to the rear of his army, which they undermined with their 
principles and propaganda. Shortly Kalchak was facing an 
army from the capital of Russia, now Petrograd, soon to 
be Leningrad. The great general, on account of his hu- 
manitarian principles was now fighting two forces, one at 
the front of him. the other at his back. They licked him. 

A Bolshevik, representing the new Soviet government, 
claimed M. G.'s ship, standing in San Francisco Hay. but 
the latter would not give it up. It was fought out in the 
courts here, and the ruling was given, finally, that as mas- 
ter. Kalchak could do what he wanted witli the ship. In 
other words, that it was practically his. Tin- ex-admiral 
of the Tsar turned it oxer to the American Government as 
a gift. Then he and his wife, without funds, sought em- 
ployment in San Francisco, as has been staled. 

Think of this man as a public official! 
* * * 

— Others besides those in big business can use high 
handed methods. It cost a woman the other day $160 to 
have moved from San Francisco to Fairfax, fifteen miles. 



one truck load of furniture. When the working force with 
the van got to the destination, it took twelve hours to dump 
the furniture on the porch. The tenant of the house- mov- 
ing out heard the story and made his bargain with some 
moving company to get his goods into San Francisco For 

thirty dollars. 

* * * 

Presumably there is a reason that can be stated why 
the tumbler pigeon tumbles. It may be his eccentricity is 
a natural gift for exhibition purposes only. The bird does 
offer an attractive sight in its whirl through the air. his 
trick fascinating like the action of an acrobat. Your fowl 
is never injured, your human tumbler very seldom. But 
it is different with the bird-man who does stunts. He 
can. and usually does, count himself as lost when seized 
with the fever to take risks a thousand or two feet up in 
the ocean of air. 

lust here we are brought to a comparison about the 
flying ability of bird and man. It is fond to the heart of 
a certain editor to claim superiority for the latter. He wdio 
champions the former should watch the aerial manipula- 
tions of the sea gull. He might gain many arguments to 
be used over what can be done with the airplane. Cross- 
ing the ferry is where you find this gull, so ugly in repose, 
so beautiful on the wing, at his best in dexterity. Then 
he of necessity makes his twists and turns. What other 
possibilities he may have in the filaments and curves of 
his long pinions should he choose to show off, he and his 
Maker only know. He is in a hundred and one activities 
while following the scent of the boat's kitchen across the 
bay and likely on each trip a few new moves are invented 
as he plies for position against the competition of a dozen 
or more companions. Notice how he takes in with his 
eye all points forward, right and left, as his head settles 
from side to side, his body following a direct line. Sud- 
denly there is something in the water that looks like food, 
and he is toward it with a surprisingly short change of 
course. Soon up he lifts again on an air current, his body 
at an angle, and even then, if a piece of bread is thrown 
over the ship's railing, he can right himself and dive down 
as before, getting it as it falls. I believe the aeroplane has 
a long time to be known before it will have listed to its 
credit so great a number of maneuvers in as few minutes 
as the adroit sea gull has, and assuredly the salt water 
flyer can change its movements quicker in proportion to 
its body than the aviator accomplishes with his plane, and 
in an account that considers velocity and doings that are 
unprepared for, the gull would be far the better of the 
two. 

— The Spreckels mansion on Van Ness avenue stands 
waiting in its dignity for a worthy purchaser. It is some- 
thing grand in red stone. How long will it stand through 
the years sustained by its constructive strength, fighting 
off cheap oilers and ineligible would-be tenants? Audacious 
rumor has more than once had it threatened with occu- 
pancy by the rag-tag of formative and poverty-stricken art 
clubs. But there it stands, uninvaded in its quiet grandeur, 
still unoccupied as if attending something better than com- 
mon bustle, asserting its fine self, while the wooden stuff 
around goes into decay. 



A. S. BALDWIN PASSES 

A. S. Baldwin, one of the oldest and best known realty 
men in San Francisco passed away this week at his home 
in Presidio Terrace, from pneumonia. Mr. Baldwin was 
president of the firm of Baldwin et Howell, and conceived 
the Twin 1'eaks tunnel project and several other residen- 
tial development projects in this city, having first entered 
the realty business in 1879, with the extensive llaggin & 
Tevis interests. He was born in Winchester. \'a.. in 1857, 
and came to California earlv in 1879. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 1, 1024 




By ANTISTHENES 

GETTING IT OFF OUR CHEST 

THE lusty two-year old infant. Community Chest, has 
again heen wrapped in its $2,174,356 swaddling clothes 
and will, for another twelve months, draw from the ample 
bottle of San Francisco's milk of human kindness. The 
proponents of the scheme have sought to popularize this 
"drive" for subscriptions by clothing it in a raiment of 
sweet charity, and, were that virtue the propelling force 
behind the enterprise, none but the knave would fail to 
contribute thereto, but — 

A drive is a drive, and. though presumably conceived in 
charity, the Community Chest is brought forth a child 
of force, the majority of contributors to which are swayed 
by one of these: fear of public opinion, of loss of prestige, 
of employers' retaliation or of neighbor's criticism! None 
of the newspapers say this. and. all the more remarkably so 
because it is usual for these to hitch to a popular enterprise, 
and. the Community Chest is not popular! 

Why Unpopular? 
Principally because its object is. mainly not charity, but 
encompasses a large assortment of items whose existence is 
but another manifestation of the baneful element gradu- 
ally choking self reliance in the American public : the pall 
of paternalism. Then, the sins incidental to what might 
be a worthy cause: in at least one residential section, can- 
vassers "demanded" contributions something after the fash- 
ion of the "shot at sunrise" methods employed in the late 
war drives; at least two corporations that "gave liberally," 
subsequently or thereabout tacked onto their commodities 
enough to reimburse them handsomely for their "charit- 
able" contributions ! So, the knowledge of these things has 
caused to set in a strong undercurrent of sentiment against 
the whole enterprise which bodes ill for its perpetuation. 

The Chest Budget ! 
As stated above, there has been or is being collected 
over two million dollars for the Community Chest. A 
glance at the published items shows a scant $970,000 of 
this vast total is for actual charity — charity that does not 
incidentally support whole organizations of able-bodied 
men and women who live off the bounty of the public; 
$70,000 is to be used alone for its distribution; objects 
having naught whatever in common with the orphan, the 
widow, the maimed and the hungry are salved with the re- 
maining $1,135,356! For instance: $'>N41 is devoted to care 
of animals; a boys' club gets $9940; two boys' and girls' 
athletic clubs receive $15,000; a young men and women's 
uplift and social organization. $23,815; another well known 
young women's recreational, educational and social outfit 
is given $93,307; a companion organization, but for men 
and boys, $180,000; another boys' club, $12,000; another 
$5851! These are a few of the "charities" that in nowise 
connote the "Suppose Nobody Cared" heartrending poster 
depicting the poor man fallen among robbers, and, folks 
are wondering which role of the illustration they are real- 



ly acting — Samaritan- 



-Victi 



Fear and Votes 

A resume of six months' appalling automobile condi- 
tions in San Francisco just published shows forty-four per- 
sons killed and thousands maimed during that period! 17,- 
200 persons were summoned to court for infractions of the 
motor vehicle law and nearly 17,000 of these were dis- 



missed with a warning by police court judges! There has 
lately been a rather spirited effort (insofar as this can ob- 
tain in our guardians) on the part of police officers to end 
this appalling condition but these frankly state their zeal 
is abortive — judges will not punish the guilty when ap- 
prehended ! 

Is there an impelling motive for these jurists being ac- 
tuallv, though not with intent, accessory to the crime of 
manslaughter? Does the fact of 17.000 culprits pardoned 
mean, actually, 17,000 favorable votes preserved for a sub- 
sequent election? Humans incline that way, you know, 
and one doesn't vote for a man who has chastised him. 
And, by the way, haven't we a little recall in our municipal 
home? 

Police say the great number of auto accidents is the 
victims' own fault because they don't prosecute the of- 
fenders! Barring the dead who are passed retort, the 
maimed, when they are able to crawl off their hospital 
cots, have small means left to spend for lawyers. Besides, 
"telling it to the judge" seems only productive of a big 

judicial haw-haw. 

* * * 

— And they'll continue to kill and maim so long a?- po- 
lice attention is attracted only by a groan or a crash; 
speeding, passing to the right unmuffled motorcycles go 
by — unchallenged — we sometimes think the cops actually 
enjoy it all. 

— It seems we must have war. No. Madge, it all came 
about this way: at a school department meeting a few 
days ago. Superintendent Gwinn inadvertently mentioned 
Dr. Cubberly of Stanford University ahead of Dr. Hart 
of California University and Mrs. Mary Prag protested! 
Honestly. Clarice, did you ever hear of such super-inad- 
vertance? Mrs. Prag was so boiling at the slight of U. of 
C. she just called the place an "ultima thule." lint. Clar- 
ice, just imagine someone's thinking Stanford was on a par 
with the big blue and gold school! President Dohrmann 
declared himself benevolently neutral during the awful 
wrist-slapping engagement because "my wife (meaning 
Mrs. Dohrmann) went to Stanford." Horrors! The board 
fearlessly and with unshaken nerve wrote Hart's name 
before Cubberly's. Well, Margie, the age of heroics is with 
us yet. Besides all this there was some desultory prac- 
tice, but no hits, on the $12,000,000 target recently voted 
for schools construction. 

* * * 

— City Auditor Boyle has returned from the state con- 
vention of auditors held at Del Monte. The gathering 
proved one of achievement, the principals of which were: 
a grand old time for the "boys," added revenue for rail- 
roads and hotel, renewed health and a change of scenery. 
Incidentally, that little Nemesis of every home town, tax 
rate, aviated a bit and the public was to-helled 'till the 
next convention. 

— United States Senator Green is nearly killed by gun- 
fire of prohibition agents on a Washington street. As Green 
is not reputed a drinking man, we opine more justifiable 
shooting might be engaged in did these U. S. gunners 
potshot around in the Cabinet — they might not wing any- 
one for boozing, but, chances are. justice might be served. 

* * * 

— And now it is said Engineer O'Shaughnessy's assist- 
ant engineer, Randell Ellis, is slated for a fat raise in con- 
nection with Hetch lletchy. That's easily accomplished: 
provided one's not branded with the mark of civil service, 
just a little pull, and presto! You're a favored protege. 

* * * 

—Egypt didn't care a fig about King Tut until those 
solid gold winding sheets showed up. Reminds us some- 
how of the big concourse that'll come to a first class fun- 
eral. 



March 1. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



INSURANCE | 

;««».»»?!? a» a a as« a'a »'» a aS k «»"» a « « « »»»« ».S«.k »■«■«■« :i :: :: x 

FIFTY six years ago, the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance 
Company established itself in a small building on the 

northeast corner of Sacramento ami Montgomery streets, 
its first policy holder being Governor Leland Stanford, in 
the sum of $10,000. Now its total life insurance in force 

is $499,040,161. 

At the recent annual meeting of this Company, all tin- 
officers were re-elected: George I. Cochran, president; Lee 
A. Phillips, vice president and treasurer; Danford M. 
Baker, vice president and superintendent of agencies; W. 
H. Davis, vice president and general counsel; Rich J. Mier, 
vice president, accident department; W. W. Beckett, vice 
president and medical director; C. I. D. Moore; vice presi- 
dent and assistant superintendent of agencies ; Howard S. 
Dudley, vice president; S. F. McClung, secretary; Alfred 
G. Harm, actuary, and in addition Mr. Arthur C. Par- 
sons, who is the local Pacific Mutual manager, was elect- 
ed vice president. Mr. Parsons has made a splendid record 
here, increasing the force with possibly the most capable 
life insurance men to be secured in this field, and his 
efforts are shown in the ever increasing multiplicity of 
business, unprecedented in life insurance. 

The Pacific Mutual's business has expanded so rapidly 
under the efficient managership of Mr. Parsons, that it is 
compelled to secure the entire three upper floors of the new 
Crocker Building, which is being erected on Market street, 
near the Chronicle, for future occupancy. 

In the annual statement that has just been issued by the 
Pacific Mutual, a most prosperous and satisfactory condi- 
tion is shown, its total admitted assets being $81,913,265.- 
91 ; its total liabilities, $73,097,086.79, while its surplus ex- 
ceeds $7,316,179.00, (exclusive of capital.) 

The new life insurance issued for 1923 (paid for basis) 
is $105,264,478.00. The Company has paid its policy hold- 
ers during 1923 $10,331,728, and since its organization $95,- 
170.842.00. 

This is a wonderful showing for a Company that is pure- 
ly California!!, and its competent staff of officers and di- 
rectors arc responsible for much of this satisfactory record. 



The Palace Hotel holds this week the mass of dele- 
gates to the meeting of the Northern Association of 
California Underwriters. Arthur C. Parsons, recently 
elected vice president of the Pacific Mutual Life, as an- 



nounced in this column, has the program under his direc- 
tion and that alone is a guarantee of most interesting things 
going on. C. C. Legerton, of the Anglo-California Trusl 
Company, will address the underwriters on the subject of 
"The Co-operation of Trust Companies with Life Insur- 
ance Companies." E. II. Wilkes, the third vice president 
of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, has made it 
possible to .show the film "Fighting for Dear Life." F. W. 
Ileron, of the Fidelity Mutual Life, and lien L". Shapro, of 
the Oakland Branch of the Equitable Life Assurance So- 
ciety, are speakers for the occasion. 

* * * 

E, E. Creswell, of the Indemnity Insurance Company of 
North America, has the office now of superintendent of 
claims. (',. A. R. Browne is the claims adjuster of the com- 
pany, through a recent appointment. 

Oakland is apparently about to embark on a campaign 
to obtain legislation to lower its insurance rates and it has 
enlisted experts in the struggle with the insurance com- 
panies. We will most probably hear a great deal more 
on this subject later on. Just now Oakland seems to be 
mapping out a program which, it is believed by insurance 
men, will be entirely successful in getting better rates for 
its people. 

* # # 

Plenty of water, at the right time and at the right place, 
means a better fire fighting capacity. In addition the best 
of fire fighting apparatus should be provided by the au- 
thorities. Having all of these very necessary tools and 
supply to fight fires the community, be it large or small, 
should make it as easy as possible to reach any given point 
where a fire may occur. This means unobstructed streets 
and good roads. Having all of the above the community 
may then with good grace and every conviction of having 
its wishes granted, ask for lower insurance rates. 



— Work is to be started shortly in clearing the ground 
for extensive enlargements to the Presidio branch of the 
San Francisco Y. M. C. A. where a program of educational, 
recreational and social work is carried on day and night 
for the benefit of men of the military reservation. More 
than $50,000 will be spent in providing a large swimming 
pool and other accommodations. Within a few davs the 
site of the addition to the Presidio "V" building will be 
cleared and construction work will start immediately-. 



— And now- Frank A. Vanderlip is being sued for "ru- 
moring" the Marion Star was sold for a half million. Even 
should he lose, many of us will but change the old adage 
to: "Where there's smoke there's" — well, smoke. 



Miner Sargeant-Barre 

Automobile 
Machinists 

SERVICE 

REPAIRING 

REBUILDING 

DAY AND NIGHT TOWING 

1540 Van Ness Ave. 
Phone Franklin 6168 



St. Marys 
oAcademy 

San Leandro, California 

n 

For particulars address 

SISTER SUP6RIOR 

Select Boarding and Day School under 

the direction of the Sisters of St. 

Dominic 



Teeth 



A minute examination of your teeth 
made several times a year will enable 
you to arrest any Incipient disease of the 
gums before it has a chance to reach the 
acute stage. Our examinations are free. 
If there is no immediate need for oar 
services there will be no charge. We are 
always pleased to talk It over. Red gums 
or sore teeth sometimes lead to serious 
disorders. Watch your teeth. You will 
like our nerve blocking system; it takes 
away all the pain and keeps you happy. 

DR. W. W. HOAGLAND 

"THAT CAREFUL DENTIST'* 

908 Market St. At Powell and Eddy 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Phone Garfield 835 
SPECIALISTS — Extractions; Crowns; 



Self Cleansing Bridges; 
and Roofless Plates. 



Porcelain Work 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 1, 1924 




^Vejyou 

HEdRpiT? 



yours," replied the little man truculently, "and I'm not here 
to listen, I'm waiting to put out the lights and lock up the 
hall." 



— The children of an infant school had been given a les- 
son on that ever-attractive subject — Adam and Eve in the 
Garden of Eden. The teacher had described, in simple lan- 
guage, the charms and beauties of the place — its fair groves 
and ^ istas, its lovely orchards, and its lawn slopes resplen- 
dent with gaily-tinted flowers. Lastly, she described how 
our first parents spent the live-long day in the enjoyment 
of all these delights. Towards the close of the lesson the 
lady asked, "Now, children, why, do you think, did God 
place all these beautiful flowers in Eden?" And one little 
girl replied, "Please, ma'am, so that Eve could give Adam 
a nice button-hole every mornin'." 

— An elderly schoolmaster, who was rather absent-mind- 
ed or forgetful, had been away from the place on a six 
months' sick leave. On his return to duties the old gentle- 
man was anxious to know how village matters had been 
going on during his absence. Accordingly, betwixt lessons 
he made inquiries of different scholars. To one he said, 
"Well, my boy, how is your father? He was very ill when 
I went away." "Please, sir," answered the lad, "he's dead." 
Later on in the clay, quite forgetting that he had already 
spoken to the boy, the old gentleman said to him, "Well, 
boy, and how is your father?" "Why," replied the lad, 
"he's still dead, sir." 

— It was a sad play, and there was scarcely a dry hand- 
kerchief in the house. But one man irritated his neigh- 
bors by refusing to take the performance in the proper spirit. 
Instead of weeping, he laughed. While others were mop- 
ping their eyes and endeavoring to stifle their sol is, his 
face beamed with merriment and he burst into inappropri- 
ate guffaws. At last a woman turned upon him indignantly. 

"1 d-dont' know what brought y-you here," she sobbed, 
pressing her hand against her aching heart; "but if y-you 
don't like the p-plav you might 1-let other p-people enjoy 
it!" 

* * * 

— Brown and Smith, returning by train from a football 
match, managed to get into corner seats about two minutes 
before the train started. 

Suddenly the}' discovered they were without tickets. The 
booking office being the other side of the station. Brown 
said to Smith: "Quick! Hurry and get our tickets." 

Smith dashed out of the compartment, but returned in 
less than a minute. 

"My word, you have been quick!" exclaimed Brown. 

"Yes," replied Smith. "I went into the next compart- 
ment and shouted 'All tickets, please!' and I've got a hand- 
ful." 

— The defendant in a breach of promise case was being 
examined by the counsel for the plaintiff. "Did you ever 
kiss the plaintiff?" he was asked. "Yes, many a time," came 
the reply. "How often?" inquired the counsel. "Well, al- 
most every evening when I called to see her." "Every eve- 
ning?" "Yes, but 1 was compelled to do it." "Compelled — 
how's that?" asked the counsel. "Why," came the retort, 
"it was the only way to prevent her singing." 

* * * 

— The lecturer was getting very prosy, and a little man 
in a seat in the front row kept openly yawning. "I'm afraid, 
my friend," said the lecturer, pointing towards him, "that 
you are not following me closely." "I'm not a friend of 



FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE 

The agricultural sections of California, this winter, have 
had more than their share of ills piled upon them. In the 
first place, the lack of rain has created a very bad condi- 
tion in more than one county of the state. We need a vast 
amount of rain that we have not had. 

To add to the complaints of the agriculturists we now 
have the dreaded "foot and mouth disease" which, it is 
said, will make necessary the killing, by Federal and State 
agents, of more than eighteen thousand head of cattle, in 
order to bring this plague to an early end. 

The disease itself is an aphthous fungoid affection of 
the mucous membrane of the lips, mouth, and throat of 
cows and horses, as well as an expression of the same dis- 
ease in the hoofs and feet of cows, horses, and hogs. 

It is being vehemently said the disease is not such as 
will attack the human being but this statement is to be 
taken with a grain of salt. When we view the activities 
of Federal and State agents and the feverish anxiety dis- 
played everywhere, as to the conditions of milk being sold 
for human consumption, it is only wisdom to come to the 
conclusion that, unless milk is thoroughly pasteurised and 
scientifically treated before it reaches the public, that there 
IS GREAT DANGER to all human beings if they are fed 
the milk, as it comes from the cow. This danger is par- 
ticularly to be dreaded unless the milk you use is thorough- 
ly pasteurised, as a food for babies. New born babies are 
sometimes affected by a disease known as aphthae which is 
analagous to the aphthous disease of cattle. Too much care 
may not be displayed to prevent any possibility of infec- 
tion through the use of milk which has not been properly 
pasteurised and the public should see to it that every bit 
of the milk they drink comes from reputable dealers. 



Comfort in Travel! 

Bakersfield 
Sleeper 




:>n the 



OWL 

Leave 

San Francisco 6 p.m. 

(Ferry) 



Dinner in the Dining Car — 
Sleep late in the morning — 
All day for business engagements — 
Returning 
Sleeper ready for occupancy 8 p. in. — 
Breakfast in Diner — 
To the office direct from station — 

Other trains at convenient hours 
Xo Time Lost 

SOUTHERN PACIFIC 



65 Geary St. 



Ferry Station 
Phone Sutter 4000 



Third St. Station 



March 1, 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



TownMLCrier 



Q WHO THE DEVIL fiRT THOU 
IjflT 'OHe THAT WILL PLOY THE 
\=3\Jpl P £WL - SIRWITHV0 U" 

jq tV Sfiakspeare- j 



— W'lm would ever think that one of the risks of the 
State Compensation Insurance Bureau is insane invasions? 
But so it is. Workmen, who have become insane, turn 
to the State Bureau, and liven up proceedings by threats 
against the life of the office force. Talk about a policeman's 
life not being a happy one! It is positively heavenly, com- 
pared with that of a Compensation Bureau clerk, with an 
insane Italian running all over the place with a knife! 

— The discovery of a body, through the Berkeley lire, 
and its subsequent identification, through the number of 
a pistol and the special dental gold plate, is a very credit- 
able performance. The body was identified as that of Fred 
('.. Wilson, an electrical engineer, wdio left home as long 
ago as 1919, and never been seen again. It was unmis- 
takably suicide. For real, good detective work it is one 
of the best efforts that have been made here lately. 

— I wonder if the road camp is, after all, going to prove 
an actual contribution to the science of penology and if 
we are really on the way to a discovery of value in the 
treatment of convicts? To turn the labor of these social 
rebels to real social gain is an achievement worth while. 
We really don't know here how much we are doing and 
how interesting some of our social experiments are, to 

the world in general. 

* * * 

— I wonder what McClatchy wants to go pounding the 
Japs all the time for? He must know that there is no 
jap menace here. He must know also that he is merely 
insulting a people who have no come back, and that is a 
beastly low thing to do. He knows the results of the 
agrarian agitation, and we wish him joy of them. Capering 

brutality helps no one and offends the civilized. 

* * * 

— There is a sort of demagogism which is very danger- 
ous, and yet, our local papers play with it. For instance, 
one of them the other day carried a heading that the rich 
men of the State are for Coolidge. Of course, as a state- 
ment, that is not true. But the resultant effect of such 
propaganda is to stir a feeling against men. just because 
they are rich. And this feeling, if carried far enough, pro- 
duces obvious trouble. 

* * * 

— "Hiram sees victory." shout the Hearst papers. Hiram, 
as a matter of fact, newer saw victory yet. It is well known 
political gossip that our senator, on the other hand, always 
takes a very gloomy view of an\ situation and is in the 
habit of pacing the floor seeing defeat where his machine 
had rendered defeat impossible. Hiram as a saint if you 
please, but Hiram as an optimist, no. thank you. 

* * * 

—No more diagonal parking, and a list of regulations 
that would keep a professional statistician busy, are the 
latest contributions to the effort to keep the streets clear. 
If that is the way to do it. people are lots more clever than 
ever I gave them credit for. and the intelligence test- ma_\ 

go into the discard. 

* * * 

—So fudge Knight of Santa Cruz goes on the Appellate 
Bench! He is a good jurist and deserves the promotion. 
\s a modest and unaffected person who has gained a merited 
distinction, lie brings a verj pleasant impression that we 
are perhaps on the wa\ to get a bench worthy of our po- 
sition anil wealth. 



— It docs not reflect any credit upon our police force 
that two assaults on women could have occurred in the 

park. Well, we will withdraw that about the poll 
perhaps thai is unjust, but it will not incline women to 
take walks even in public places. The civilization of a 
place is shown among other things by the safety of wo- 
men. \ reputation for insecurity will not send our tocl 
Up. So the police had better get busy, whether they are 
to blame or not. 

* * * 

— War has a dreadfully long-armed effect. Take, for ex- 
ample, the case of Count Kessler, who spoke on Thurs- 
day. Here is a man of great attainments, one of the finest 
and most highly developed personalities. Some of those 
who went to hear him actually apologized for doing so. 
Ten years ago they would have been proud to have come 
within a hundred yards of him. And yet the war was not 
at all the fault of Count Kessler. 



O'SHAUGHNESSY'S REPORT 

The City Engineer. M. M. O'Shaughnessy, brought out 
in his recent report of the Bureau of Engineering that ex- 
tensions, though sorely needed in many parts of the City, 
must necessarily await the outcome of the negotiations now 
pending between the city and the Market Street Railway 
Company. In the event that an equitable price can be 
agreed upon, this matter will be referred to the people 
for consummation. The City Engineer says: 

"The settlement of this question (the Market Street Rail- 
way Company purchase) is of vital importance to this City, 
as no permanent solution of our transportation problems 
can be attempted until we are in a position systematically 
to arrange our present street car lines and develop exten- 
sions. The advantage of a unified management of our car 
lines has been stressed in previous reports of this office, 
and needs no further amplification here. 

"During the past fiscal year many requests have been 
made for extensions to the Municipal Railway system, in- 
volving both the construction of new trackage and the ex- 
pansion of the motor bus service. In the last annual report 
it was pointed out that no extensions should be undertaken 
which would not fit in with the unified ownership and op- 
eration of the privately owned and Municipal systems." 

The City engineer brings out that: 

"The growth of the Richmond District is rapidlv nearing 
a point where the construction of a line along Balboa Street 
from Thirty-third Avenue easterly will become very desir- 
able. Though growing into a well built up and denselv 
populated section of the district, it has. in the four long 
blocks between Geary and Fulton streets, no street rail- 
way line. The population here is at the present time one- 
fourth of that of the entire district, and if the present rate 
of building is maintained, the situation may soon become 
acute. It is possible that with the further growth of the 
Richmond District, the congestion on Geary Street might 
be such as to necessitate routing Balboa Street cars over 
some other street to the down-town district. A possible 
solution, requiring further study to avoid some steep grades, 
might be a continuation of the line along Balboa Street 
to Turk Street and thence on Turk to Market Street. This, 
however, is one of the problems which depends for it- so- 
lution on a settlement of the Market Street Railway pur- 
chase. It is a good example of the handicap that both the 
.Municipal and the Market Street systems are under as long 
as present conditions obtain." 



HOTEL RICHELIEU 



Von Neia Ave., at Geary Street 



SAN FRANCISCO 



Is the most refined family hotel in the city 
— a home unsurpassed 



ELMER M WOODBURY >Iana c er 



10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 1, 1924 






IJ^NANOALV 



By P. N. BERINGER 

IT is with a great deal of satisfaction that we hear Brig- 
adier General Dawes has endorsed the French occupa- 
tional theory and practice, as far as the Ruhr is concerned, 
and it is specially gratifying to the SAX FRANCISCO 
NEWS LETTER, because this column has. from the first. 
heartily endorsed the means adopted by the French to 
bring about desired results. Dawes practically says that, 
without the Ruhr occupation, nothing at all would have 
been accomplished towards reparations. As it is, France 
and Belgium have benefited to some extent and there is 
a much "more practical and honest view of the situation 
forced upon Germany and Germany is about ready to 
act soon, basing its action on this very practical view point. 



Effect in England 

We have not seen anything very wonderful happening 
in England on account of the change to a so-called labor 
government. In many minds in this country, and almost 
universally in England, there has been a belief that, with 
labor at the helm, something very drastic would happen to 
France, because of that labor domination in British affairs. 



The Mexican situation 

Every dav passing develops a new and a better situa- 
tion as far as the Federal government is concerned, and a 
worse condition of affairs as far as the rebellion is con- 
cerned. De la Huerta is in Tabasco and Yucatan, and from 
these remote parts of the country is threatening to take 
Mexico City, by telegraph. In other parts of Mexico small- 
er revolutionary groups are keeping the government busy 
but these will all soon be accounted for and then will re- 
main the job. for the government, to wipe out the big fac- 
tion still remaining active in Tabasco and Yucatan. 



Trade With Mexico 

Our merchants should look toward an improvement of 
trade relations with Mexico almost immediately. The 
American Chamber of Commerce at Mexico City is avail- 
able for all sorts of information and San Francisco pos- 
sesses an office, which is maintained by the Mexican gov- 
ernment, and from which information of all kinds may be 
obtained. 

Mexican Trade Relations 

Mexico wants to trade with us and being our next door 
neighbor, as it were, increased trade relations should be 
easv to establish. Mexico should be studied by our world 



merchandisers. We now have in the neighborhood of two 
hundred and fifty firms and individuals doing business with 
Mexican customers. We should have twice that many do- 
ing double the business that is now done. 

Our Big Banking Business 

San Francisco's banks are expanding their facilities, and 
getting ready to handle a very large increase of capital 
for the summer and fall of 1924. This year, it is said by 
bankers, will be the banner year, so far. in the history of 
San Francisco, and this being the money center of the 
coast, is also naturally of California in general. 1923 quiet- 
ly piled up more money business, transacted in and out of 
San Francisco, than any previous year and the prediction 
is that the total achieved in 1923 will be eclipsed by many 
millions in 1924. 



The Income Tax 

It is creeping nearer and nearer to the last call for the 
income tax returns and it is hoped that merchants and 
others will attend to this matter soon. It is well to re- 
member that, for certain causes, the collector may grant 
an extension of thirty days. 

The commissioner, at Washington, may not grant a fur- 
ther extension unless it is shown that a complete return 
cannot be made in the thirty day period. 



Bridges and Business 

There may be no doubt expressed that business, in order 
to come thoroughly into its own, must expand along the 
lines of least resistance and that is one of the main rea- 
sons why the business man should be whooping it up for 
the building of many bridges to connect San Francisco 
with the state at large. We should have all the bridges 
necessary to make it possible to do business along the lines 
of least resistance and to make San Francisco as easily 
reached by automobile and trucks as any other city in the 
state. 



Our Business Zone 

The wholesale and retail business zone, of San Fran- 
cisco, is that territory lying north of the Tehachapi and, in 
that territory, we should know no competition. As it is 
today that field is invaded from the north and from the 
south and we should pay attention to this fact by making 
it impossible for outsiders to deviate trade from the big- 
metropolis and manufacturing center of the Pacific Coast. 
New York is today confronted by a similar condition al- 
though, of course, the territory, the trade, and the compe- 
tition is on a much vaster scale than anything encountered 
by San Francisco, thus far. The biggest problem for New 
^ ork to face is its own immense and rapid growth and 
this growth, having forced certain manufacturing busi- 
nesses into Jersey, there is now a zoning committee at 
work trying to figure out how Xew York may ^till glow 
as to business and yet keep its manufacturing establish- 



Members San Francisco Stock Exchange 



Mining and Oil Stocks 
Bonds and Industrials 



ZADIG & CO. 

COMMISSION STOCK BROKERS 

Send for Our Market Letter, Just Out 

370 Bush Street 

Phone Kearny 172 5 San Francisco, Cal. 




Are You 
Particular? 



■s— SKffl/ Wo Offer 

Dining Car Service and Observation 
Cars With Speed and Comfort for your 
trip to Sacramento and the Sacramento 
Valley. 

For further information call 

San Francisco — Telephone Garfield 64 

Oakland — Telephone Piedmont 345 

San Francisco-Sacramento R. R. 

The Scenic Route 



San Francisco Plating Works 

1349-51 Mission St., bet. 9th and 10th 

E. G. Denniston, Prop. 
Phone Market 2915 

We plate every description of metal 
work and goods with Gold, Silver, 
Nickel, Brass, Copper and Bronze in 
an elegant and durable manner. 

AVe call for and deliver work 

Automobile and Household Goods a 
Specialty 



March 1. l'U4 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



11 



ments, especially those engaged in the making of heavy 

chemicals. 



Real Estate Sales 

The transfers of real estate in all of the bay region, 
especially in San Francisco and its suburbs, arc phenome- 
nal. This also means that the building operations, which 
have been actively followed all winter, will increase very 
materially, from now on. Every suburban region has the 
same report to make, as to real estate and building. In 
Oakland, the metropolis across the bay, we have a record 
breaking pace established in building operations. 

Rain Wanted Badly 

The rains we have had this season are by no means suf- 
ficient to supply the necessities of the farmer and the cities 
will also feel the want of more water, later on. The reser- 
voirs are low, and will be much lower unless we get more 
rain. The great increase of population, all over California, 
and especially in the towns and cities, makes a heavier 
rainfall, and for some continued time, a necessity of far 
more importance than the ordinary citizen knows anything 
about. The region about Fresno, for instance, usually one 
of the most beautiful and most prolific in production, has 
had such a poor supply of rainfall that it is pitiful to look 
at the fields and the cattle of the region. In Contra Costa 
the rainfall has been so slight that the fields in many parts 
of the country are still sere and brown. 
* * * 

New General Manager for Santa Fe 

W. K. Etter, for the past year acting general manager of 
the Santa Fe Railway's Coast Lines with headquarters in 
Los Angeles, has been made general manager, effective 
since February 15. 

Mr. Etter succeeds I. L. Iiibbard, former general man- 
ager, who has been appointed to the position of assistant to 
the vice-president. A. G. Wells, with headquarters in Los 
Angeles. Mr. Hibbard had been on sick leave for a year, 
following a breakdown in his health. 

The new general manager, prior to coming to Los An- 
geles to take up the duties involved in the Los Angeles 
office, was assistant to the vice-president at Chicago. He 
has been with the Santa Fe for a number of years. For some 
time he was in charge of the system lines in Oklahoma. 

— The medieval punishment meted out to secretary of 
the interior. Fall, would probably have been boiling in oil. 

MARY HERETH CAROLINE JONES £ 

Luncheon is served from ll: 30 to 2:30, 
and tea from 3 to 5 
JC 
"V^gfi? 334 SUITER STREET Douglas 7 1 1 8 




Western Pipe & Steel Co. of California 

Manufacturers of 

RIVETED STEEL PIPE, TANKS, CULVERTS, FLUMES, 

PENSTOCKS. GASHOLDERS, SMOKE STACKS, ETC. 

San Francisco, Calif. Los Angeles, Calif. 

444 Market St. 6717 Santa Fe Ave. 






Made to Measure 

only 



IMPORTED FABRICS 
PAJAMAS AND 
NIGHT ROBES 

25 Kearny St., Phone Ky. 3714 



i::i!:!iii>; 



. 



all die 




when business 
or pleasure 
takes you 
from home 

Tickets to all points 
East via the route 
of scenic surprises 
including - ' 

GrandCanyon 

National Park 

Tell us where you want" 
to go and we will sub- 
mit suggested itinerary 

R. D. Johnson, Div. Pass. Agent, 601 Market St., or 
Market Street Ferry. Both Phones: Sutter 7600. San Francisco 

lllllllllllllllllllilllillll! 



PLANT 

Roses, Fruit Trees and 
Ornamental Shrubbery Now 

Stock can be seen at our Nursery, on 
Green Street, near Van Ness Ave. 

Our 1924 Catalog, containing full 

planting instructions, mailed on 

request 

HALLAWELL SEED CO. 



258 Market St. 



San Francisco 




HOMES 



READY to ERECT 
on Your Property 

$300up 

simplex unit construction co. 

106 11th Street. S;m Francisco 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 1, 1924 




BUSY CUTID 

MISS ELIZABETH GOODHUE OF PASADENA has announced 
her engagement to Mr. Alvah Kaime of Santa Barbara and 
Pebble Beach. No date has been set tor the wedding. Miss 
Goodhue is the daughter ot Mrs. Frank D. Goodhue and the 
late Mr Goodhue of Pasadena. Her mother was Miss Anne 
Pierce of San Jose, one of the several beautiful sisters who 
were favorites in San Francisco society. Miss Goodhue is a 
cousin ot Mr. Marshall Madison. Mrs. Wakefield Baker. Miss 
Caroline Madison. Mrs. John dishing. Mrs. Horace Van Sick- 
len Mr. Frederick Beaver Jr., Mr. Peter Beaver and Mrs. 
Victor Cooley. Mr. Kaime is the son of Mr. and Mrs. George 
Kaime of Santa Barbara and the brother of Miss Laura Kaime. 

MRS ATHERTON MACONDRAY plighted her troth to Mr. Wil- 
liam Otii Edmands of Lake County, Calif., at a quiet wed- 
ding held Wednesday at Trinity Episcopal Church in Gough 
street. Rev. Charles P. Deems, rector of the church, otti- 
ated There were no attendants for either party and only 
the two families were present at the marriage. Among them 
were Mr and Mrs. Royal P. Macdonald, Mr. and Mrs. Bergie 
Barry Beckett. Mr. and Mrs. Herman Phleger, Mr. and Mrs. 
William Hammond Edmands. Mrs. Edwin Breyfogle and the 
Misses Dorothv and Sarah Collier. After a short honeymoon 
Mr. and Mrs. Edmands will go to the former's ranch at Lake 
Countv, where will be their future home. 

MISS LUCY HANCHETT became the bride of Mr. Vincent K. 
Butler Jr. on Saturday at Montecito, where the Hanchett 
family have been living for the past year. It was an un- 
usually pretty wedding and took place at 5 o'clock in the 
afternoon. The Hanchett home is one of the attractive places 
of Montecito and has beautiful gardens. The ceremony was 
performed by Father Harvey of Menlo Park in the large 
drawing room. Miss Alice Hanchett, a sister of the bride, 
was maid of honor. Master Corbett Hanchett, the small 
brother of the bride, was the ring bearer. Mr. Nelson Hackett 
was the best man. The bride is the daughter of Mr. Lewis 
Edward Hanchett and the first Mrs. Hanchett, whose death 
occurred a number of years ago. She was Miss Lucy LTpson 
of Sacramento. Mr. Vincent K. Butler Jr., who is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. V. K. Butler of San Francisco, and a brother 
of the Reverend Raymond Butler, J. S. and Lt. Frederick B. 
Butler, U. S. A., won the Rhodes scholarship and in 1913 
graduated from Oxford College. During the war he served 
overseas as a captain with the Ninth Aero Squadron. Mr. 
and Mrs. Butler will make their home in San Francisco. The> 
have taken an apartment at 2637 Lyon street. 

MISS MARY SWAN CROWTHER of Savannah, Ga., and Mr. 
William Wallace Sprague of this city have announced their 
engagement. Miss Crowther is the daughter of Mrs. Courtney 
and the late Dr. Crowther of Savannah. Mr. Sprague be- 
longs to one of the oldest families of San Francisco. He is 
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Sprague and the half- 
brother of Mrs. William Henry Pool of Warrenton, Va.. and 
Menlo Park. He is a grandson of the late Judge Wallace, 
one of the most notable jurists of his day, and there are 
many family connections including the Oxnards, the Dona- 
hues and the Martins. Mr. Sprague is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of California and during the war he served as a first 
lieutenant overseas. 

MISS BARBARA CURTIS, the daughter of Colonel and Mrs. 
Lawrence Curtis, announced her engagement last Saturday 
to Lieutenant Edward M. Starr, U. S. A., at a tea given by 
Miss Caroline Kiester. Miss Curtis is one of the popular girls 
of the army set and a recent graduate of the University of 
California, where with her hostess and the girls of her more 
intimate group she was a member of the Gamma Phi Beta 
sorority. Her fiance is aide to General Edwin Babbitt, U. S. 
A., and is stationed at Camp Lewis. The wedding will prob- 
ably take place in June. 
MISS KATHRYN KRAFT and Mr. Howard Fletcher announced 
their engagement at a tea given Wednesday afternoon by the 
bride-elect at her home in Union street. Miss Kraft is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Karl F. Kraft and a niece of Mrs. 
J. E. Birmingham and Mrs. George Gunn. Mr. Fletcher is the 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Fletcher of Nevada and a 
brother of Dr. Harold Fletcher. The marriage will take place 
within the next several weeks. 
MISS SUZANNE DE LENCLOS and Mr. Edward E. Eyre's wed- 
ding will take place this Saturday at St. Mary's Cathedral, 
and will be one of the interesting events of the late winter 
season. 



MISS FRANCES PRINGLE and George MacDonald have post- 
poned their wedding from March 12 to some later date the 
last of April, following Easter. The change was made ow- 
ing to the fact that Mr. and Mrs. MacDonald could not make 
it convenient to come from Scotland for the marriage of 
their son at this time. As soon as their sailing date is defi- 
nite, the wedding plans will be made. 
LUNCHEONS 

MRS. JOHN BAKER Jr. entertained at luncheon Tuesday at the 
St. Francis in honor of Mrs. Charles Keenan. 

MRS. HERMAN PHLEGER gave a luncheon Tuesday for Miss de 
Lenclos at the Town and Country Club. 

MRS. ADOLPH B. SPRECKELS entertained at a luncheon Thurs- 
day at her home in Washington street. 

MISS BEARSDLEY will share honors with Miss Katherine Mac- 
kail, whose engagement has been announced to Mr. William 
Elie Jason Jr., at a luncheon which Miss Helen Hammer- 
smith will give Saturday afternoon, March 22nd. 

MRS. GEORGE HATTON of the Palace Hotel was hostess at 
an informal luncheon and card party given in the French 
Parlor of the Hotel Wednesday. 

MISS CAMILLE GUITTARD was hostess at a large luncheon on 
Saturday at the Women's Athletic Club. It was given as a 
farewell to Miss Dorothy Stevenson and Miss Mary Dennis 
Searles, who are going to Europe with Mr. and Mrs. Steven- 
son in April. 

MISSES LAWTON FILER, Jane Carrigan and Edna Taylor made 
an attractive group at the St. Francis Monday. Mrs. Paul 
Fagan was hostess to a party of five and Miss Marie Welch 
and Miss Dorcas Jackson were together. Mrs. Georges de 
Latour, who recently returned from abroad, had Miss Maud 
O'Connor and Miss Tiny O'Connor with her. Mrs. Samuel 
Knight was hostess to Mrs. Walter Filer, Mrs. Thomas East- 
land and Miss Josephine Grant. 

MISS MADELINE SISSON will give a luncheon party at the 
Palace Hotel on Tuesday, March 4, for Miss Lenore Fitzgibbon, 
the fiancee of Brooke Mohun. 

MRS. HOWARD PARK was hostess to a group of the younger 
set at a luncheon party at the Women's Athletic Club this 
week. 

TEAS 

MRS. GEORGE PINCKARD gave a tea Tuesday afternoon at her 
Clay street home for Miss de Lenclos. 

MRS. KARL KRAFT and her daughter. Miss Katherine Kraft, 
entertained at tea Wednesday afternoon at their home in 
Union street. 

MISS ALICIA GEORGE and Miss Norine Buchanan presided over 
one of the smartest teas of the week in the French Parlors 
at the Palace Hotel. The affair was complimentary to Miss 
Penelope Boden, who just recently announced her engage- 
ment to William Stone Davis. Miss Boden is a graduate 
of the University of California and a menvher of the Alpha 
Xi Delta sorority. She is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. G. C. 
MacDonald' of San Francisco. Davis is also a graduate of 
California and a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fra- 
ternity. 

MISS HELEN GLASSFORD was hostess at a tea given in the 
Tapestry Room at the Palace Hotel Saturday afternoon. Cards 
were played in the early part of the afternoon followed by 
a tea in the Rose Room. The affair was complimentary to 
Miss Theiline McGee, fiancee of Paul Piggot. 

MISS ELIZABETH WRIGHT, who sailed on Wednesday for the 
Hawaiian Islands, was the honored guest of Mrs. Winthrop 
Austin, who entertained at an informal tea Monday after- 
noon. The party was held at the Austin home in Sacra- 
mento street. 

MISS LEONORE FITZGIBBON. whose engagement to Mr. Brooke 
Mohun has been announced, was the principal guest at a 
tea given on Saturday at the Palace by Mrs. Howard Welch. 

MRS. ADOLPH B. SPRECKELS entertained at an informal tea 
Sunday afternoon at her home in Washington street in com- 
pliment to Mr. Dudley Field Malone and Mr. David Warfield. 

MRS. A. C. BLAKE complimented her sister, Mrs. Gaillard 
Stoney. with an informal tea Monday afternoon. The party 
was held at the home of the hostess in Jackson street, where 
Mrs. Blake has been visiting for some time. Mrs. Blake will 
return I he middle of March to Boston. 

MRS. ALEXANDER THOMAS entertained for Mrs. James F. 
Dunne at one of the largest teas given last Saturday at the 
Palace Hotel. 



COLONIAL HOTEL 

r»0 Hush Street, Between Powell and Stockton, San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 3560 
HOWARD T. BLETHE.W Proprietor 



March 1. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



13 



HISS RUTH WOODWARD will give a tea at the home of her 

parents, Mr, and Mrs. F. W. Woodward, on March 8. 
MRS. A. PAGE MAILL1ARD entertained at an informal tea Mon- 
day afternoon when sin was hostess to a small group of 
relatives and intimate friends. 
MRS. WILLIAM KENT gave a tea Thursday afternoon at her 
home in Kentfleld. The event was for friends to meet Mrs. 
James Thatcher and Miss Harriet I'omeroy. Miss Pomeroy 
and Thomas A. Thatcher will he married on March 4. 
MRS. FREDERICK PURNER was hostess at a tea Wednesday 
as a farewell courtesy to .Mrs. .lames F. Dunne, who is leav- 
ing soon for Europe. Mrs. Turner was assisted hy Mrs. Austin 
Judge and Miss Madeline Sisson. 
BRIDGE 
MRS. ARTHUR MORRIS FLOOD recently entertained at bridge 

tea at the Fairmont Hotel, where she resides. 
MISS BARBARA BEARDSLEY, the bride-elect of Mr. Gregory 
Harrison, who has been entertained at a series of affairs 
since the announcement of her engagement, was the compli- 
mented guest at a bridge tea given Saturday afternoon by 
Miss Elizabeth Harrison. The party was held at the home 
of the hostess in San Rafael. 
MRS. JAMES F. DUNNE will give a large bridge and man jongg 
party at the Palace Hotel next Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Dunne 
will go to their ranch, near Gilroy, for a short time before 
leaving for Europe. 

DINNERS 
MR. AND MRS. HARRISON DIBBLEE, who left on Wednesday 
for New York and Europe with their daughter, Miss Betsy 
Dibblee, were the guests of honor at an informal dinner 
given Thursday evening by Mr. Evan Evans. The affair was 
held at the home of the host in San Rafael. 
MR. AND MRS. RICHARD McCREERY entertained a number of 
their friends at a supper party Sunday evening at their home 
in Burlingame. About thirty-five guests shared the pleasure 
of the affair. 
COUNT AND COUNTESS VITTORI SICILIANI DI MORREALE 
were dinner hosts Saturday in the gray room of the Hotel 
Fairmont. 
MISS ETHEL LILLEY, who is leaving soon for Europe, Mr. and 
Mrs. Chouteau Johnson entertained at a dinner Thursday 
evening. The party was held at their home in this city. 
MISS MARY GARDEN, who is very popular in San Francisco and 
peninsula society, for whom a round of affairs are always 
given during her engagements in San Francisco, will be the 
complimented guest at a large dinner which Mrs. Ferdinand 
Thieriot will give on Tuesday, March 6. The affair will be 
held at the Pacific Coast Jockey Club at Tanforan. which is 
becoming a very popular place for entertainments. 
MR. WILLIAM W. CROCKER was the guest of honor at a hand- 
some dinner given by his friends at the Pacific Union Club 
recently, the event celebrating Mr. Crocker's return from 
abroad, where he passed his honeymoon. 
MR. CYRIL McNEAR gave a dinner Tuesday night at the home 
of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John McNear. in Broderick street. 
It was in honor of Miss Suzanne de Lenclos and Mr. Edward 
E. Eyre, whose marriage will take place this Saturday. 
MR. AND MRS. ERNEST FOLGER and Miss Elena Folger en- 
tertained some of their friends at a dinner party Thursday 
evening at their home, 
MR. AND MRS. CHARLES QUINN gave an interesting golf din- 
ner at Del Monte recently which included .Mr. and Mrs. Mal- 
colm McNaughten of Los Angeles and Mr. and Mrs. Preston 
of Toronto. The McNaughtens are making a long stay at 
Pebble Beach. Mrs. McNaughten, who was Miss Letts before 
her marriage, the daughter of Arthur Letts of Los Angeles, 
passes much of her lime at Pebble Beach and is a familiar 
figure on the bridle paths. 
LADY FRENCH SHELDON was the guest of honor at a dinner 
party given by Mr. and Mrs. Nion Tucker and M. H. de Young 
at the hitter's residence, on California street. 
DANCES 
DR. AND MltS. FRANK DRAY entertained at a dinner dance 
in honor of their niece, .Miss Dorothy Meyer, on Wednesday 
evening. The partj was held in the Hotel St. Francis and 
was enjoyed by 50 of the younger set. Miss Meyer received 
the guests with her uncle and aunt and her parents. The 
early winter was passed hy the bud in Europe, where she 
went in October witli her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Herman 
L. E. Meyer .1 1 The laniih toured the continent until the 
hitter part of January, when they sailed [or home. Th- 
rived in San Francisco only last Wednesday and they have 
reopened their borne in Green street. 
MARD1 GRAS — Plans of Golden Gate and Mission councils. 
Knights of Columbus, for new clubhouses and community 
centers, under "Casey" auspices, in the Park-Presidio and 
Mission districts of San Francisco, will be aided by a gala 
Mardi Gras celebration this Saturday evening. March 1st. in 
the Exposition Auditorium. Civic Center. The Mardi Gras 
function is to he a revival of San Francisco's famous society 



Mardi Gras affairs of former years, and will include many 
of the spectacular effects ami attractions of the previous af- 
fairs, together with several new and novel ideas of the 
"Caseys" origin. Several prominent out-of-town national and 
state officials of tie- Knights or Columbus will be pn 

at Saturday night's Mardi Gras, including State Deputy Frank 
B. Michel Jr. of Sacramento, Supreme Director Frank Lon- 
Brgan of Portland, Supreme Warden David I-'. Supple of San 
Francisco, and others. Tickets for the March 1st affair arc 
on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., and Kohler & Chase, and 
on Saturday evening, will be on sale at the Exposition Audi- 
torium box-offices. Civic Center. 

RECEPTION 
THE CALIFORNIA CLUB gave a reception and tea in honor of 
Mrs. Adolph B. Spreckels on Tuesday. February 26th, at the 
Club Rooms in Clay street. Mrs. Spreckels spoke on the 
history of the Order of the Legion of Honor as well as the 
history of the Palace of the Legion of Honor in Paris, and 
also related some of her personal experiences in France. Mrs. 
Spreckels showed two films which were given to her by the 
Government of France, one o£ which depicts the manufactory 
at Sevres, and the other the manufactory of the Gobelins. 
Both of the industries belong to the Government of France. 
There was on exhibition the model of the California Palace 
of the Legion of Honor which shows minutely the exquisite 
beauty of the Memorial, and there were also a display of 
photographs showing the different stages of the construction 
of the building at Lincoln Park. Mr. John W. Mitchell, who 
is also giving a Museum which will be situated in the City of 
Coronado, spoke on the lines of art. 
IN TOWN AND OUT 

MR. AND MRS. ROY BISHOP will spend the summer in Menlo 
Park where they have taken the residence of Mr. and Mrs. 
Richard Girvin Jr. for the season. They will be joined in 
June by their son, Mr. Richard Bishop, who is attending an 
Eastern school. 

MISS SARA DEAN left for Los Angeles last week en route to 
New York and Europe. She will be abroad indefinitely. Miss 
Dean made her home in London for several years, and since 
her return here last year, has lived at the Fairmont. 



THE WORLD'S ART SALON RECEPTION 

It must have been the potency of the wonderful nectar served, 
aside from the cordial graciousness of the host and hostess, that 
pervaded the atmosphere of the Geo. McGowan home in Broad- 
way last Tuesday night, with such a genial glow. The occasion 
was the reception of the World's Art Salon, of which Mrs. Geo. 
McGowan is president, given in honor of the California Poetry 
Club, and the members of both organizations commingled in 
happy fellowship, throughout the flower bedecked drawing rooms 
of the McGowan mansion. 

Lady Mogan. of the California Poetry Club, had charge of 
the program, which included songs by Wm. Holten, Marion 
Vecki, and Feijiro Tatsumi, accompanied by Mrs. Milton Sey- 
mour and Isobel Arndt, pianists, a dance by Ruthelma Stevens, 
and reading of poems composed by Mrs. McGowan and Ethel 
Turner. Mrs. Edwin Markham, the honor guest, read some origi- 
nal poems, deprecating the fact that her husband was not there 
to read some of his own. Incidentally, Edwin Markham has 
just been officially made poet laureate of Oregon, of which state 
he is a native. Among the hundreds of guests present were: 
Mr. and Mrs. Homer Henley, Judge and Mrs. Louderbach, Mr. 
and Mrs. George Douglas, Mrs. A. W. Scott. Mrs. Davis Louder- 
bach. Dr. and Mrs. Shaw, Mrs. Gladys Wilmot Graham, Mrs. 
Beatrice Judd Ryan. Mrs. Ava Salbador, Mrs. Pietro Caronna, 
Mrs. Eleanore Ross. Charles H. Grant. Nathaniel Anderson, and 
others in art. society, musical and literary circles. 

Quite a number of the army and navy set were present, in- 
cluding Captains and Mines. March Houser, Carroll Gale, Ed- 
ward T. Comegys, and Harold E. Eastwood. 



AT DEL MONTE 

— Miss Claudine Spreckels and Miss Alice Moflitt, popular 
members of the San Francisco younger set. with Dr. and Mrs. 
Herbert C. Moflitt. spent the week-end at Pebble Beach. Much 
of their time was devoted to riding. 

— Lady Baillio of Toronto, with her delightful children, little 
Miss Edith and Master James, are established at Del Monte Lodge 
for the remaining winter months. The Baillie's have many 
friends in the fashionable Pebble Beach colony. 



HOTEL DEL MONTE 

Make Your Reservations at City Booking Office 
401 Crocker Building 

Under Management CARL 3 STANLBT 



Telephone Batter tit* 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



March 1, 1924 




By KEM 

"The mind functions better along- any line if it is 
occasionally drawn far away to some remote and un- 
usual range of ideas." — Jesse Lee Bennett. 

YOU CAN CHANGE IT (Though You Won't) by 
Charles Lawson, is a little book about Human Nature 
which carries you in thought to the remote past to prove 
to us that much that is the best in us has come from animal 
or bird life back of us; and to prove his theory quotes from 
Prince Kropotkin's MUTUAL AID A FACTOR IX EV( >- 
LUTION: 

"In a flock of crows, there is enough general affection 
to shame a human community — or if tapped, to reform it. 
What does a crow do when he spies a splendid field punct- 
uated in tender green? Keep it quiet, or at least first fill 
his own crop? Not by a scarecrow! He wings it back and 
starts calling, 'Come on fellers! The digging's fine!'" — 
with this spirited object lesson in memory, follow the au- 
thor as he wisely and wittily takes us down through the 
centuries to the present time. Here after arraigning us For 
being "cramped in civilization's straight-jackets." for hav- 
ing "stifled the old racial instinct of commonalty so long," 
he tells us how to quit being "dough" and to turn ourselves 
into "yeast that will help us all onward and upward." It 
is a bright, practical little book to give to a friend who 
needs to change — and, incidentally, it might be well to read 
it ourselves before passing it on. 
Appleton, $1.50. 

* * * 

AURILLY, THE VIRGIN ISLE, an unusual Sea 
Story of the North-West by Charles W. Garrett. 

This is a story of romance and adventure that takes one 
to the far North, and to a mythical island, where any thing 
extremely unusual might be staged, and the author has 
taken advantage of the situation to stage it. It is a story 
for those who like their imaginations stretched to take iii 
a superhuman mystery, and who will be interested in the 
author's biological and historical interpretations, also in 
some remarkable conception of the origin of sex upon this 
planet. It is a unique book, for the very few interested in 
remote and unusual ideas. 

Christopher Publishing House. $2. 

* * * 

William McFee, engineer, and author of the stirring ro- 
mances, CASUALS OF THE SEA, ALIENS, and COM- 
MAND, entertained a large audience in the Paul Elder 
Gallery last Tuesday evening. He gave a "Truth Presen- 
tation of Things Seen." mostly in the Mediterranean Sea. 
This sea. he told his hearers, was "the cradle of civilization, 
and that was probably why most of the American tourists 
went there with infant minds — knowing very little about 
its wonders or the colorful history of the age-old lands 
against whose shores it rocked." This unflattering state- 
ment was softened to the American mind by a "truthful" 
anecdote he told about an English skipper visiting America 
for the first time, and being shown the Bunker Hill .Monu- 
ment. He at once asked Mr. McFee what it was commem- 
orating. 

"The American Revolution," he was told. 

"And what revolution was that?" he asked. 
"Why, the big one in 1776." 

"My word! Fancy, now! At it that far back, and these 
Americans are still having revolutions. I heard a fortnight 
ago. they were having one down in Mexico." 



Being entertained with such flashes of wit, made it easy 
to understand why Mr. McFee is known as "The Modern 
Dickens;" and he surely added to the number of his admir- 
ers. His latest novel is COMMAND, published by 

Doubledav. Page and Co., $1.90. 



Wedding Presents — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell Sts. 



A New 



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If Books that are reviewed in the News Letter can be obtained 

« PAUL ELDER'S 

AND I'AIT. EIDER'S LIBRARY 

| 239 Post Street San Francisco 

ESgjgiilgHiaiSBHBlSBlllBllSElBHlllBHHIlBllMiaSliaiHEiaS 




March 1. 1924 



AND CALIFORNIA ADVERTISER 



15 




That the automobile buyer, and not 

the maker, is the true progressive, lias 
been proved by existing tacts. While 

manufacturers are prune to boast of 
their progressiveness when announcing 
the new features they incorporate in 
their cars from time to time, as a mat- 
ter of fact they are followers rather 
than leaders. 

Go back to the very beginning and 
recall who it was who first put head- 
lights onto an automobile. It was the 
owner who first bought them from an 
accessory store and mounted them on 
his car after he had bought it. Not 
for several years did headlights be- 
come "standard equipment." The mak- 
er did put a little carriage step on the 
car, but it was the owner who first 
saw the need of a running board. 

The same is true of fenders. The 
maker did put a narrow mud-guard 
directly over the wheels ; but it was 
an owner who first added the apron 
which connected the mud-guard to the 
frame. And so on down the line, in 
connection with each and every ac- 
cessory. 

Every one of the adjuncts that are 
now considered indispensable on the 
motor car were not only first added 
by the owner but were used by him 
for several successive seasons before 
even the most progressive manufac- 
turer considered it good policy to fea- 
ture them as a part of his latest model. 



ing accomplishment was during the 
war when he had complete charge for 
the Government of the production of 
all Liberty motors turned out by the 
various automobile plants throughout 

the country. 

Heaslet has inn. Mimed many of the 

leading shop practices now in general 
use in the most important motor car 
plants, lie was one of the first to work- 
to limits below one one-thousandths 
of an inch in automobile engines and 
manufacturing practices, lie is a pi- 
oneer progressive engineer and produc- 
tion authority. 



That the automobile plays an impor- 
tant part in rendering prompt and ef- 
ficient service to the consumers of the 
Pacific Gas and Electric Company, is 
indicated by figures issued by the Au- 
tomotive Engineer of that Company. 
During the past year. 573 Touring'Cars 
and roadsters, and 601 Commercial Ve- 
hicles and Trucks were used. The ve- 
hicles traveled over ".000,000 miles or 
the equivalent of 3000 trips across the 
continent. 



San Francisco is the onl) one of 
tin' principal cities in the United States 

that showed an actual reduction in the 
number of deaths from motor vehicle 
accidents during 1923. Deaths here 
were 21 less last year than for 1922, 
despite a large increase in the number 
of automobiles. 



— Visitor — I iocs your new baby 
brother cry much, Ethel? lithel 10 
cries when you stick pins in him or 
make faces at him or bounce him up 
and down. But what can you expect? 
lie's too young to swear. 



Few people realize the vast amount 
of important work that James G. Heas- 
let, president of the Rollin Motors 
Company, has contributed to the au- 
tomobile industry. For years Mr. 
Heaslet was vice president in charge 
of all engineering and production of 
the great Studebaker interests. \n ex- 
ecutive position of this magnitude nat- 
urally called tor a man of not only a 
line scienti